Posts with «nano» label

Quadruped robot made entirely out of cardboard

Walking robots can be a lot of fun, but many people would logically think that they need CNC equipment or a 3D printer to make this sort of bot. Creator “Raz85,” however, shows that this isn’t actually required, and built a quadruped using a structure comprised entirely out of corrugated cardboard.

Each of the four legs are driven using 9g micro servos, controlled by an Arduino Nano. A human operates the spider-inspired robot with a remote consisting of an Arduino Uno and a small joystick module, while pair of NRF24L01 radio transceivers provide a link between the robot and controller.

Despite its simple construction, the quadruped moves around impressively well…

These interactive hair extensions can communicate over Bluetooth

For the most part, the next generation of wearable technology development has been focused around your wrist, arm, ears, and even your face. Hair, however, remains a unique and much less explored material… until now, at least.

That’s because the team of Sarah Sterman, Molly Nicholas, Christine Dierk, and Professor Eric Paulos at UC Berkeley’s Hybrid Ecologies Lab have created interactive hair extensions capable of changing shape and color, sensing touch, and communicating over Bluetooth. The aptly named “HairIO” conceals a skeleton of nitinol wire, a shape memory alloy (SMA) that morphs into different forms when exposed to heat. An Arduino Nano handles control, enabling it to respond to stimulus such as messages from your phone using an Adafruit Bluefruit board.

That’s not the only trick of these fibers, as they can use thermochromic pigments to change color along with the SMA action, and respond to touch via capacitive sensing.

Human hair is a cultural material, with a rich history displaying individuality, cultural expression and group identity. It is malleable in length, color and style, highly visible, and embedded in a range of personal and group interactions. As wearable technologies move ever closer to the body, and embodied interactions become more common and desirable, hair presents a unique and little-explored site for novel interactions. In this paper, we present an exploration and working prototype of hair as a site for novel interaction, leveraging its position as something both public and private, social and personal, malleable and permanent. We develop applications and interactions around this new material in HairIO: a novel integration of hair-based technologies and braids that combine capacitive touch input and dynamic output through color and shape change. Finally, we evaluate this hair-based interactive technology with users, including the integration of HairIO within the landscape of existing wearable and mobile technologies.

Be sure to check out the video below and read more in the team’s tutorial here!

Arduino Blog 20 Mar 14:21

Control your computer sheet music with the PartitionsDuino

Performing an instrument well is hard enough, but flipping through sheet music while playing can slightly delay things in the best case, or can cause you to lose your concentration altogether. Music displayed on a computer is a similar story; however, Maxime Boudreau has a great solution using an Arduino Nano inside of a 3D-printed pedal assembly.

When set up with software found here, Boudreau’s DIY device allows you to control PDF sheet music on your laptop with the tap of a foot. While designed to work with a macOS app, there’s no reason something similar couldn’t be worked out under Windows or Linux as needed.

Check it out in action below!

Antique Coke machine enhanced with Arduino can counter

“ChrisN219” is the proud owner of an antique Coke machine that he uses to store his favorite beverages. While a very cool decoration, it doesn’t have a way to reveal how many cans are left.

To add this functionality, he turned to an Arduino Nano along with an ultrasonic sensor that he embedded inside the machine to sense how high the cans are stacked. This allows the user to know when it’s time to stock up again, and after inserting another ultrasonic sensor to the display unit on top, an OLED screen automatically shows the sodas (or beers) available as someone approaches it.

If you’d like to build your own, you can find more details, code, and 3D printing files in ChrisN219’s write-up.

Pong embedded in a vintage Sony Watchman with Arduino

There’s perhaps no other game more classic than Pong, and likely none that require fewer control inputs, making it perfect for “porting” to a Sony Watchman. While an amazing piece of tech when introduced in the early ’80s, the current lack of analog TV signals means they only receive static.

As seen here, hacker “sideburn” decided to do something about it, and removed the tuner and decoder chip, making space for an Arduino Nano in the device’s housing. To complete the build, he hooked up the Arduino outputs to TV inputs, along with the tuner as a paddle controller and built-in switch as a start/pause button, and was able to seal the unit up again.

The result is a retro gaming system that looks completely stock, playing Pong as if it was there the whole time. Be sure to check out the video to see it in action!

Automate a rubber strip door with Arduino

In order to separate their office and shop areas, NYC CNC installed a rubber strip assembly that had to be pushed out of the way every time someone wanted to walk through. Although functional, it was also quite annoying, so they installed a system that uses a pneumatic cylinder to automatically move the rubber strips out of the way.

The device uses an Arduino Nano for control and VL53L0X  time-of-flight sensors for presence detection. In addition, it features a clever gear and belt assembly to mirror one side of the door with the other.

You can find more details of the build in the video below and check out the project’s components, Fusion 360 design files, and Arduino code here.

Measure RPM with an IR sensor and Arduino

When dealing with robotics and other electronics projects, it can be important to know how many revolutions a motor is making. From here, you can infer the distance that your device has traveled, or any number of other important variables.

If you’d like to get started with this type of sensing, this electronoobs tutorial will show you how to get things hooked up using an Arduino and a computer, along with an oscilloscope to verify measurements up to 10,000 RPM.

In his setup, an IR emitter/receiver bounces light off a spinning object. When light reflects back, it opens the circuit, causing the output to be grounded via a pulldown resistor, telling you that a revolution has been made. The 3D-printed device also features an OLED screen.

To emit infrared light we need a IR LED and to detect it a IR sensible transistor. Usually you could find those as a one unique module. To amplify the signal I’ve used the LM324 amplifier. You will also need a 100 ohm resistor and a 4.7k ohm one. To supply the system we will need a basic 9V battery and connector, an Arduino Nano, and an OLED screen. The case is 3D printed…

You can find more details on the build process here, as well as a demo of the tachometer below!

Arduino Blog 27 Feb 20:09

YouTuber creates an organ out of 44 Furbies

If you think Furbies have become extinct, think again, as musical hacker “Look Mum No Computer” has decided to revive a number of them to create his own Furby Organ.

To make this horrifying yet awesome instrument, he placed 44—yes, 44—of these strange creatures on top of an organ frame with a keyboard and several dials, along with a switch labeled ominously as “collective awakening.”

Each individual Furby is controlled by two Arduino Nano boards, and as you might imagine, the whole project took a massive amount of work to wire things together. You can see the incredible results in the first video below, while the second gives a bit more background on the device’s origin.

Arduino Blog 12 Feb 21:01

Recreate Optimus Prime’s blaster with Arduino

YouTuber Bob Clagett has dreamed of creating his own life-sized Optimus Prime ion blaster for years, and now after hours of 3D printing and finishing, he finally has something worthy of that universe.

While he opted to construct it in a 1:2 scale, it’s still an impressive physical build, looking comically large, but not entirely unwieldy as a full-sized 8-foot blaster would have been.

Inside, sound and lighting effects are controlled by an Arduino, which plays clips from the show and flashes in different patterns via an Adafruit sound board and RGB LED strip.

I wanted the blaster to play sounds and have lights come out of the barrel so I rigged up an Arduino Nano with an Adafruit sound board and amp that would cycle blaster sounds and lights when a button was pressed. And because there’s always more than meets the eye, I had a separate button that played just Transformers sound clips. To defuse the LED strip when the lights fired, I printed a semi-translucent disc that would stand-off from the sides so that sound could still escape, but the light would be diffused. I decided to mount all of the audio components in the barrel so that the cannon could be taken apart to charge the battery back.

You can see the entire process in the video below, or check out his post for a summary.

Add an Arduino-based tachometer to your CNC router

In order to get a good cut with a CNC router, the cutting tool speed needs to be properly set. Since his CNC didn’t come with RPM feedback, Troy Barbour came up with his own solution using an Arduino Nano along with an IR emitter/sensor pair.

The spindle was set up with a single reflective surface, enabling it to sense one pulse per revolution that is sent to the Arduino at up to up to 30,000 RPM. To ensure accurate measurement, the device was programmed using an interrupt, meaning that if another process is running, it will temporarily drop what it’s doing and count the incoming pulse.

RPM is displayed on a tiny OLED screen, which shows both an RPM number as well as a dial indicator for quick reference.

Build an optical RPM indicator for your CNC router with an Arduino Nano, an IR LED/IR photodiode sensor and an OLED display for less than $30. I was inspired by eletro18’s Measure RPM – Optical Tachometer Instructable and wanted to add a tachometer to my CNC router. I simplified the sensor circuit, designed a custom 3D-printed bracket for my Sienci CNC router. Then I wrote an Arduino sketch to display both a digital and analog dial on an OLED display.

You can see it in action below, and find build instructions and code on Barbour’s write-up.