Posts with «rc» label

Cheap Toy Airboat Gets a Cheap R/C Upgrade

[Markus Gritsch] and his son had a fun Sunday putting together a little toy airboat from a kit. They fired it up and it occurred to [Markus] that it was pretty lame. It went forward and sometimes sideward when a stray current influenced its trajectory, but it had no will of its own.

The boat was extracted from water before it could wander off and find itself lost forever. [Markus] did a mental inventory of his hacker bench and decided this was a quickly rectified design shortcoming. He applied a cheap knock-off arduino, equally cheap nRF24L01+ chip of dubious parentage, and their equivalent hobby servo to the problem.

Some quick coding later, assisted by prior work from other RC enthusiasts, the little boat was significantly upgraded. Now the boat could be brought back to shore using any R/C controller that supported the, “Bayang,” protocol. He wouldn’t have to face the future in which he’d have to explain to his son that the boat, like treacherous helium balloons, was just gone. Video after the break.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, toy hacks
Hack a Day 07 Sep 09:01
airbot  arduino  arduino hacks  boat  hack  nrf24l01+  rc  servo  simple  toy  toy hacks  

Nerf-firing Rover

Primary image

What does it do?

Navigate via RC control, fires Nerf gun, supports autonomous control via Raspberry Pi

This rover makes use of the following:

CPPM RC radio input from openTx RC radio

Arduino Nano to handle communcations from RC, Raspberry Pi via USB (not attached  yet), I/O to servos via i2c, I/O to/from Roboclaw motor controller via serial (gets velocity from encoders on motors), and output to various DC-driven devices (headlight, gripper).

5.8ghz video transmitter for FPV roving

Cost to build

$600, 00

Embedded video

Finished project

Number

Time to build

50 hours

Type

wheels

URL to more information

Weight

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New Project: Build Your Own Android-Powered Self Driving R/C Car

Learn how a team of students created the first Google Android-based autonomous R/C car, able to detect lanes, avoid obstacles, self-park, and more.

Read more on MAKE

The post Build Your Own Android-Powered Self Driving R/C Car appeared first on Make: DIY Projects, How-Tos, Electronics, Crafts and Ideas for Makers.

Using RC Transmitters With Flight Simulators

It’s winter, and that means terrible weather and very few days where flying RC planes and helicopters is tolerable. [sjtrny] has been spending the season with RC flight simulators for some practice time. He had been using an old Xbox 360 controller, but that was really unsuitable for proper RC simulation – a much better solution would be to use his normal RC transmitter as a computer peripheral.

The usual way of using an RC transmitter with a computer is to buy a USB simulator adapter that emulates a USB game pad through a port on the transmitter. Buying one of these adapters would mean a week of waiting for shipping, so [sjtrny] did the logical thing and made his own.

Normally, a USB simulator adapter plugs in to a 3.5mm jack on the transmitter used for a ‘buddy box’, but [sjtrny] had an extra receiver sitting around. Since a receiver simply outputs signals to servos, this provides a vastly simpler interface for an Arduino to listen in on. After connecting the rudder, elevator, aileron, and throttle signals on the receiver to an Arduino, a simple bit of code and the UnoJoy library allows any Arduino and RC receiver to become a USB joystick.

[sjtrny] went through a second iteration of hardware for this project with a Teensy 3.1. This version has higher resolution on the joystick axes, and the layout of the code isn’t slightly terrible. It’s a great project for all the RC pilots out there that can’t get a break in the weather, and is also a great use for a spare receiver you might have sitting around.


Filed under: peripherals hacks, radio hacks

Controlling a Quadcopter with Gestures

[grassjelly] has been hard at work building a wearable device that uses gestures to control quadcopter motion. The goal of the project is to design a controller that allows the user to intuitively control the motion of a quadcopter. Based on the demonstration video below, we’d say they hit the nail on the head. The controller runs off an Arduino Pro Mini-5v powered by two small coin cell batteries. It contains an accelerometer and an ultrasonic distance sensor.

The controller allows the quadcopter to mimic the orientation of the user’s hand. The user holds their hand out in front of them, parallel to the floor. When the hand is tilted in any direction, the quadcopter copies the motion and will tilt the same way. The amount of pitch and roll is limited by software, likely preventing the user from over-correcting and crashing the machine. The user can also raise or lower their hand to control the altitude of the copter.

[grassjelly] has made all of the code and schematics available via github.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, drone hacks

Reach Out and Touch Your Next Project with Long Range RC Controller

Long range wireless control of a project is always a challenge. [Mike] and his team were looking to extend the range of their current RC setup for a UAV project, and decided on a pair of Arduino mini’s and somewhat expensive Digi Xtend 900Mhz modems to do the trick. With a range of 40 miles, the 1 watt transceivers provide fantastic range. And paired with the all too familiar Arduino, you’ve got yourself an easy long range link.

[Mike] set the transmitter up so it can plug directly into any RC controller training port, decoding the incoming signal and converting it into a serial data package for transmitting. While they don’t provide the range of other RF transmitters we’ve seen, the 40 mile range of the modem’s are more than enough for most projects, including High Altitude Balloon missions.

The code for the Arduino transmitter and receiver sides is available at their github. Though there is no built-in error correction in the code, they have not had any issues.  Unfortunately, a schematic was not provided, but you should be able to get enough information from the images and datasheets to construct a working link.

 


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, drone hacks

Autonomous Racers!!!

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What does it do?

Race each other around the room

Hello everyone, I’ve posted a lot on LMR, and I build robots for a living, but this is the first time I’ve built a personal robot that I’m able to tell you all about. First off, I got this idea from Fritsl (http://letsmakerobots.com/node/928 ) and I decided I wanted to build a pair of wall racers for my nephew who has always asked me to build him some robots. If you’ve never heard of a wall racer it is a modified RC car with two sonars, one pointing forward the other pointing to one side.

Cost to build

Embedded video

Finished project

Complete

Number

Time to build

Type

wheels

URL to more information

Weight

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Car alarm remote control repurposing

A while ago, I got hold of a car alarm unit and its two remote control fobs. When i hooked it up to 12V I realized that it didn’t  work, not responding to any of the commands from the two fobs even though their batteries were OK. Naturally, I opened up the unit to start harvesting parts and noticed the RF module within (the one that sticks out perpendicularly) and I figured it shouldn’t be too hard to use the module with an Arduino.

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Let's Make Robots 30 Jan 19:50

Yellow Plane 2 with Inverted V Tail

 

[nickatredbox] keeps up to date with the improvements of his project [yellow plane]. As you can find on this blog, the project is evolving week by week. Let’s see what’s today submission

1200 mm Wing space
280 mm cord
14% Clark Y
Target AUW 1300 Grams

Missing battery and camera box have a design which should weigh 140 grams empty.
The assembly shown below weighs 684 Grams no motor or electronics.
Electronics shown weigh 110 grams ESC Arduino board, Xbee, antenna and Gyro board
Motor & prop another 120 Gram

Here you have a [video]  and there you can follow the project on the [website]

The A.S.R.B.

Primary image

What does it do?

Navigate via GPS, Compass, and avoids obstacles using 5 IR sensors

Hi all, I'm Matt and currently a junior in high school. I built first robot called the "A.S.R.B." over the summer for the Authentic Science Reseach Program and I wanted to share it with all of you! *I'm going to apologize in advanced if my spelling/wording/grammar is terrible--It's been a long day and I'm in a rush to get this posted.* Using the chassis of the duratrax evader EXT-2, I built this robot from the ground up.  I swapped out the esc and dc motor for a traxxas 12t 550 that I had lying around, and the esc is now the traxxas xl-5.

Cost to build

$300,00

Embedded video

Finished project

Number

Time to build

100 hours

Type

wheels

URL to more information

Weight

3500 grams

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