Posts with «iot» label

Programming Linux Devices With Arduino And The Cloud

Back in the olden days, when the Wire library still sucked, the Arduino was just a microcontroller. Now, we have single board computers and cheap microcontrollers with WiFi built in. As always, there’s a need to make programming and embedded development more accessible and more widely supported among the hundreds of devices available today.

At the Embedded Linux Conference this week, [Massimo Banzi] announced the beginning of what will be Arduino’s answer to the cloud, online IDEs, and a vast ecosystem of connected devices. It’s Arduino Create, an online IDE that allows anyone to develop embedded projects and manage them remotely.

As demonstrated in [Massimo]’s keynote, the core idea of Arduino Create is to put a connected device on the Internet and allow over-the-air updates and development. As this is Arduino, the volumes of libraries available for hundreds of different platforms are leveraged to make this possible. Right now, a wide variety of boards are supported, including the Raspberry Pi, BeagleBone, and several Intel IoT boards.

The focus of this development is platform-agnostic and focuses nearly entirely on ease of use and interoperability. This is a marked change from the Arduino of five years ago; there was a time when the Arduino was an ATmega328p, and that’s about it. A few years later, you could put Arduino sketches on an ATtiny85. A lot has changed since then. We got the Raspberry Pi, we got Intel stepping into the waters of IoT devices, we got a million boards based on smartphone SoCs, and Intel got out of the IoT market.

While others companies and organizations have already made inroads into an online IDE for Raspberry Pis and other single board computers, namely the Adafruit webIDE and Codebender, this is a welcome change that already has the support of the Arduino organization.

You can check out [Massimo]’s keynote below.

GO-4 SMART HOME ARDUINO BOT

Primary image

What does it do?

IOT Robot

In this project I will

Cost to build

$50, 00

Embedded video

Finished project

Number

Time to build

24 hours

Type

URL to more information

Weight

150 grams

read more

Control Your Light Switches from Your Phone

Ahmet Akif Kaya built a system. that incorporates an Arduino, Bluetooth module, and servo. to control his light switch from his cel phone.

Read more on MAKE

The post Control Your Light Switches from Your Phone appeared first on Make: DIY Projects and Ideas for Makers.

IOT AI in the Cloud using Reinforcement Learning

Let's Make Robots 04 May 23:03
ai  arduino  cloud  esp8266  iot  

Introducing the Arduino MKRFOX1200

On Arduino Day, we announced the latest member of the Arduino MKR family: the MKRFOX1200. This powerful IoT development board offers a practical and cost effective solution for Makers looking to add Sigfox connectivity to their projects with minimal previous networking experience.  

The MKRFOX1200 shares several similarities with other MKR products, like the MKR1000 and MKRZero, including a compact form factor (67 x 25mm) and a Microchip SAM D21 32-bit Cortex-M0+ microcontroller at its core. The recently unveiled board also features an ATA8520 module for long-range, low-energy consumption, and is capable of running for over six months on two standard AA 1.5V batteries.

Designed for Makers ready to take their IoT projects into the real world, the MKRFOX1200 comes with a GSM antenna that can be attached to the board and a two-year subscription to the Sigfox network. This provides users with full access to Sigfox’s efficient messaging system (up to 140 messages per day), cloud platform, webhooks, APIs, as well as the new Spot’it geolocation service.

MKRFOX1200 can be used in a wide variety of settings, from agriculture (livestock management, smart irrigation and weather stations), to smart cities (dumpster monitoring, air quality networks, street lighting or parking lot tracking), to utility metering and other industrial applications.

“Sigfox loves Makers,” says Nicolas Lesconnec, Head of Developer Relations. “Sigfox aims to empowers billions of new IoT solutions. We’re proud to partner with Arduino, the leading open-source electronics platform, to offer the simplest way to connect anything.”

Sigfox currently operates in over 30 countries, with more to follow in the next few years. (Use this map to see whether it has been deployed or is rolling out in your area.) The first version of the MKRFOX1200 is compatible with Sigfox Radio Configuration Zone 1 (868MHz, 14dBm), meaning it is only supported in network-covered regions of Europe, the Middle East, and South Africa.

Interested? You can find the MKRFOX1200’s specs here, and watch Massimo Banzi’s overview below. The board is now available on Arduino’s European online store!

Arduino Blog 18 Apr 12:14

Hacking Robotic Arm using Controllino and Cayenne


 

Description

This tutorial will show you how to take over the controls of the OWI Robotic Arm with the help of an Arduino compatible, open-source PLC called the Controllino MAXI, together with Cayenne (my go-to iOT application for remote connection to my Arduino projects). The Controllino MAXI will provide the physical connections to the OWI robotic arm, and Cayenne will allow me to control the arm via my web browser or via the Cayenne app on my phone.


 

Arduino Libraries and IDE

  1. The Arduino IDE can be used to program the Controllino. You can dowload the Arduino IDE from here: https://www.arduino.cc/en/main/software.
  2. You will also need to read the Cayenne Ethernet library installation instructions in order to install the Cayenne Ethernet Library.
  3. The Controllino will connect to the internet via the Ethernet port onboard.
  4. You do not need the Controllino library for this project, however, if you have a Controllino, you might as well install the library. You can read the Controllino library installation instructions from their GitHub webpage here: https://github.com/CONTROLLINO-PLC/CONTROLLINO_Library.
  5. You will need to notify the Arduino IDE of the Controllino MAXI board by pasting the supplied URL into the "Additional Boards Manager URLs" in the Arduino IDE.
  6. This is located under: FILE - PREFERENCES - Additional Boards Manager URLs.
  7. The URL that you need to paste is in STEP 3 of the Controllino Library installation instructions on their GitHub page.
  8. The video at the top of this tutorial may help clarify the process.

 
 
 

ARDUINO CODE:

The code above is very simple, however you will need to create a dashboard of widgets from within your Cayenne account in order to control the OWI robotic Arm from your phone or via the Dashboard webpage.


 
 
 

Setting up Cayenne Dashboard

Once you have created your Cayenne account, you will be presented with a webpage to choose a board to connect to. Controllino is an Arduino compatible PLC, so make sure to follow these instructions for setting up the Controllino in your Cayenne Account.

  1. Select Arduino from the available list of boards.
  2. Make sure to install the necessary libraries if your have not done so already.
  3. Select Arduino MEGA from the avaliable list of Arduino boards
  4. Select Ethernet Shield W5100
  5. Copy and paste the Arduino code that pops up on screen into your Arduino IDE and upload to the Controllino.
  6. Alternatively, copy and paste the code from above, however you will need to insert your Authentication token to get it to work

After you upload the code to the Controllino, and providing it has an ethernet cable connected to the internet router (and has access to the internet), and is powered on, it will connect to your Cayenne Dashboard. You can now add widgets to the dashboard in real time to interact with the Controllino, and without uploading any more code to the open source PLC.


 
 

Adding Widgets

We need to add a number of widgets in order to activate the relays on the Controllino. The relavent digital pins that we will need to know about can be found on the Controllino website here: https://controllino.biz/downloads/.

Here is the direct link to the PINOUT file for the Controllino MAXI.

"Armed" with that knowledge, we can now create the widgets which are necessary to control the relays on the Controllino. From within the Cayenne dashboard, please follow these instructions to create a widget:

  1. Select - ADD NEW
  2. Select - DEVICE/WIDGET
  3. Select - ACTUATORS
  4. Then - RELAY from the dropdown box
  5. Select - RELAY SWITCH
  6. Give the widget a descriptive name to differentiate it from the other widgets and a name that is somewhat informative (eg. R0 - Pos)
  7. I gave the first widget the name "R0 - Pos", because it will connect to Relay R0, and that relay will be connected to the Positive (POS) terminal of the OWI robotic arm.
  8. Select the device you would like to connect to. Be aware that you can change the name of the device in the settings. If you followed this tutorial, it should have the name "Arduino MEGA", but I changed the name of the device to "Controllino" to be more accurate.
  9. We will be using a digital pin to control the relay, therefore select "Digital" as the Connectivity option
  10. For this specific widget, we will be controlling R0, which is activated by digital pin D22 on the Controllino. Therefore select "D22" from the "Pin" dropdown box.
  11. Choose a "Button" as the widget type
  12. Choose an icon from the dropdown box that makes sense to you
  13. Skip Step 1
  14. Select Step 2: Add actuator

You should now see your new widget on the dashboard. Select the widget to enable or activate that relay. If you do this, and if everything goes to plan, you will see the LED for R0 illuminate on the Controllino. You now have to add the rest of the widgets to the dashboard in order to control the rest of the relays on the Controllino.


 
 

Widget Dashboard

Here is a table to show you how I setup my dashboard.


 
 
 

Fritzing diagram


 
 

OWI Robotic Arm Pins


 
 

Normal OWI Robotic Arm Circuit

The following circuit diagram will show you how the wired control box is normally connected to the OWI Robotic arm. This is the circuit diagram of the OWI robotic arm under normal operating contidtions.


 
 

OWI Robotic Arm Circuit when connected to Controllino

The following circuit diagram will show you how the OWI Robotic Arm will be controlled by the relays of the Controllino. This is the circuit diagram of the OWI robotic arm when it is connected to the Controllino.


 
 

All connected

The OWI Robotic Arm is connected to a breadboard using the female-to-male jumper wires. Solid core wire is then fed through to the relay terminals of the Controllino. You could just wire it up so that the robotic arm is connected directly to the Controllino, however, I did not have the right connectors for this purpose.
The Controllino is also connected to my internet router via a normal RJ-45 ethernet cable, and is powered by a 12V DC power adapter.


 
 

Summary

Now that you have all the physical connections made, uploaded the code to the Controllino, and have created your dashboard in Cayenne, you should be able to control your OWI Robotic arm from anywhere in the world. As demonstrated in the video at the start of this tutorial, the robotic arm has quite a bit of give on each of the joints, which makes it difficult to achieve certain tasks that require an element of precision. There goes that idea of being able to perform surgery with this thing !!! At least you can get it to make you a cup of tea, and if you are patient enough, you might even get a grape once in a while.

Thank you to Controllino and Cayenne for making this tutorial possible. If you would like your product featured in my tutorials, please contact me on my contact page.


 
 


 
 
 
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Monitor All the Laundry Things with this Sleek IoT System

If like us you live in mortal fear of someone breaking into your house when you’re on vacation and starting a dryer fire while doing laundry, this full-featured IoT laundry room monitor is for you. And there’s a school bus. But don’t ask about the school bus.

In what [seasider1960] describes as “a classic case of scope creep,” there’s very little about laundry room goings on that escapes the notice of this nicely executed project. It started as a water sensor to prevent a repeat of a leak that resulted in some downstairs damage. But once you get going, why not go too far? [seasider1960] added current sensing to know when the washer and dryer are operating, as well as to tote up power usage. A temperature sensor watches the dryer vent and warns against the potential for the aforementioned tragedy by sounding an obnoxious local alarm — that’s where the school bus comes in. The whole system is also linked into Blynk for IoT monitoring, with an equally obnoxious alarm you can hear in the video below. Oh, and there are buttons for testing each alarm and for making an Internet note to reorder laundry supplies.

We’ve seen a spate of laundry monitoring projects lately, all of which have their relative merits. But you’ve got to like the fit and finish of [seasider1960]’s build. The stainless face plate and in-wall mount makes for a sleek, professional appearance which is fitting with the scope-creepy nature of the build.


Filed under: home hacks

Temperature logger using arduino and thingspeak

Hello Arduino lovers,

In this tutorial, we are making a temperature logger using arduino and thingspeak.
Let's start

Things required:

  1. Arduino Uno
  2. LM35
  3. Sim900 module
  4. Internet pack 
  5. Thinkspeak account




Make connections as given in the diagram. Connect Tx of GSM module to pin number 7 of arduino board and Rx of of GSM module to pin number 8 of arduino uno and ground should be common between these two.
Output of LM35 should be connected to A0 of arduino board.
Arduino Uno GSM module LM35
Pin no. 7 Tx
Pin no. 8 Rx
Pin no. A0 Output of Lm35
Download code from link below
Now, upload the code

Video:

Hope, you guys had enjoyed the video

Thanks for visiting my blog



Quick and Easy IoT Prototyping with Involt

IoT, web apps, and connected devices are all becoming increasingly popular. But, the market still resembles a wild west apothecary, and no single IoT ecosystem or architecture seems to be the one bottle of snake oil we’ll all end up using. As such, we hackers are keen to build our own devices, instead of risking being locked into an IoT system that could become obsolete at any time. But, building an IoT device and interface takes a wide range of skills, and those who are lacking skill in the dark art of programming might have trouble creating a control app for their shiny new connected-thing.

Enter Involt, which is a framework for building hardware control interfaces using HTML and CSS. The framework is built on Node-Webkit, which means the conventions should be familiar to those with a bit of web development background. Hardware interactions (on Arduinos) are handled with simple CSS classes. For example, a button might contain a CSS class which changes an Arduino pin from high to low.

Involt can take that CSS and convert it into a function, which is then sent to the Arduino via serial or Bluetooth communication. For more advanced functionality, Javascript (or really any other language) can be used to define what functions are generated — and, in turn, sent to the Arduino. But, all that is needed for the basic functionality necessary for many IoT devices (which might only need to be turned on and off, or set to a certain value) is a bit of HTML and CSS knowledge. You’ll create both the interface and the underlying hardware interactions all within an HTML layout with CSS styling and functionality.

While Involt isn’t the only framework to simplify hardware interaction (it’s not even the only Node.js based method), the simplicity is definitely laudable. For those who are just getting started with these sorts of devices, Involt can absolutely make the process faster and less painful. And, even for those who are experienced in this arena, the speed and efficiency of prototyping with Involt is sure to be useful.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks
Hack a Day 05 Feb 03:00
arduino  arduino hacks  css  html  involt  iot  node  

How to update esp8266 firmware

In this post, we are going to upload firmware to ESP8266 (ESP-01) . The firmware can be updated by both arduino as well as usb-ttl module.
ESP-01 is wifi SoC module and it has two GPIO pins i.e. GPIO0 AND GPIO2
For using ESP8266, we can use either AT commands using any terminal software/ esplorer ide (it supports lua programmming and AT commands) or we can use arduino library.
ESP8266 is a 8-pin SoC having two GPIO pins, it requires 3.3 volt and the current consumed by wifi module can't be attained through arduino. Therefore, if we are using arduino we need external 3.3 volt power supply.
Esp8266 wifi module can act as STA as well as AP or both


Things required:

1. USB-TTL module
2. Perfboard
3. Male and female berg strip
4. Female to female jumper wires
5. ESP-01
6. Nodemcu flasher
7. Firmware to be updated
8. Little bit of patience :)

Connections:

Make connections as given below:
ESP8266 side                                               USB-TTL module
Rx                                                                  Tx
Tx                                                                  Rx
CH_PD and Vcc                                           3.3 volt provided by the usb-ttl module
GND                                                              GND
GPIO0                                                           GND (while updating the firmware only)

Updating the firmware:

We had connected switch to GPIO0, by pressing the switch it GPIO0 will be grounded
In order to update the firmware, make the connections on perfboard. In this circuit, we are using two switches
one for GND and other for GPIO0.
Download Nodemcu flasher from the link below:
Download firmware from the link below:
Make settings as given in the picture. Browse the firmware file (ends with .bin)

Note: GPIO0 should be grounded while updating the firmware.
Vcc and CH_PD should be connected to 3.3 volt only

Check out the video:


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