Posts with «rgb leds» label

3D-printed “orbament” lights up with movement

What would you get if you crossed a gigantic Christmas tree ornament with an LED strip and Arduino/IMU control? Perhaps you’d come up with something akin to this colorful “RGB LED Ball” by James Bruton.

The device features eight curved supports along with a central hub assembly, forming a structure for APA102 RGB LED strips. Each of these is linked together via wiring that winds through the central hub making them appear to the Arduino Mega controller as one continuous chain of lights. 

Several animations can be selected with a pair of control buttons, and the ball even responds to movement using an MPU6050 IMU onboard. Files for the build are available on GitHub.

Turn your door into an ‘alien portal’ using Arduino

As YouTuber Evan Kale puts it, his set is was kind of boring. He decided to spruce things up by turning his ordinary door into an “alien portal,” lining it with a strip of RGB LEDs. Though this may not be the first time you’ve seen this type of lighting in action, he directs our attention to a few interesting details about using them in typical Kale style.

One interesting note comes around the 4:50 mark, where he points out his portal is controlled using Hue Saturation Lightness (HSL) via a potentiometer instead of RGB. This keeps the glowing effect consistent, while allowing color adjustment.

For this project, he employed an Arduino Nano, which looks like a great choice since it needs a limited amount of I/O. Using this tiny board, the entire control package can fit into his small 3D-printed enclosure.

You can see a demo of Kale’s “alien portal” below, and check out his channel for more fun Arduino projects!

Arduino Blog 15 May 20:01

Incredible RGB LED Cube Tutorial


We’ve seen our fair share of LED light cubes before, but what makes this one different is its incredibly detailed, step-by-step tutorial.   The creator of this light show previously made a one color LED light cube and shared the trials, tribulations and instructions.  He has since decided to go multi-color, again while challenging himself and learning some new tricks along the way.


The project requires 512, 10mm RGB LEDs and an Arduino compatible microcomputer. The creator used wooden strips to create vertical panels of LEDs rather than horizontal layers for ease of building. The building and soldering took about one weekend and the software took about 70 hours. The author saves you time by providing most of the code for you.  Learn how to  fbuild your own RGB LED cube!

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Hack n Mod 11 Jul 11:07