Posts with «radio» label

Decoding Weather Radio messages with Arduino

Arduino user Vogel1230 wrote us:

I’ve been involved with NOAA Weather Radio for some time and Arduino is a recent passion of mine over the last couple of years. When I found out about the Silicon Labs Si4707 Weather Band IC, it only made sense that I try to use my hardware knowledge and try and come up with a breakout board to make this capability available to the public.

I teamed up with Ray Dees who had done a lot of work with decoding weather radio messages using a different architecture. After a few months of collaboration on software we were able to build a very strong library that enables even the beginner to use all the features of the iC and modify as they see fit for their application. The code is currently optimized for UNO and Mega2560 use.

 

Arduino Blog 23 Jan 23:23
arduino  library  radio  weather  

T'REX robot controller

 

The T'REX robot controller makes controlling robots easy!

The Arduino compatible controller comes pre-programmed with sample code that lets you control it with a supplied Android app, Radio Control or with an external controller via I²C.

Specifications:

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Vintage radio hacked into a docking station

Mr. Oyvind from Oslo sent us a cool  hack of a 75-years-old radio into an iPhone dock using an Arduino.

On his website you can read the complete tutorial or download the code and below you can have more details on the way he used the board:

the Arduino is used to read the state of the dual potentiometer that controls the volume and then translate this value into a certain number of LEDs being lit on the volume indicator.
I am using a Duemilanove. The code for the project is very simple and can be found here:http://www.build-electronic-circuits.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/radio_ino.zip
  •  An overview of the inside of the dock (very messy, I know )
  •  I am using a dual potentiometer (2 pots in one). Here you can see one pot connected to the amplifier on the left to control the volume, and the other connected to the Arduino on the right to read the position of the pot.

  • Here you can see the 4 wires used to control the volume display connected to digital input 2, 3, 4 and 5 on the left side of the board. And you can see the potentiometer connected to 3.3V, analog input 0 and ground on the right side of the board.

Arduino Blog 17 Jun 18:39

Interfacing from PC to Arduino via PWM radio

Greetings fellow LMRians,

I am in the planning stage of building a quadcopter, which will be my first ever flying robot. So excited!!!! I have a question for you all: how would I interface some sort of PC control to the machine?

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AM tube radio restored and given MP3 playback too

This AM radio looks a bit like it did coming out of the factory. But there are a lot of changes under the hood and that faceplate is a completely new addition. The project really is a restoration with some augmentation and [Michael Ross] did a great job of documenting the project.

The Kenyon radio was built in 1946 and uses vacuum tubes for the amplifier. Considering its age this was in relatively good shape and the first thing that [Michael] set out to do was to get the electronics working again. It involved replacing the messy collection of capacitors inside. He then cleaned up the tubes, checking for any problems, and put the electronics back together to find they work great!

He cleaned up the chassis and gave it a new coat of finish. The original dial plate was missing so he built a wood frame to match a dial scale he ordered. The bell-shaped brass cover hides the light that illuminates the dial.

He could have stopped there but how much do people really listen to AM radio these days? To make sure he would actually use the thing he added an Arduino with an MP3 shield. It patches into the antenna port via a relay, injecting modern tunes into the old amplifier circuit. Catch a glimpse of the final project in the video after the break.


Filed under: digital audio hacks
Hack a Day 02 May 14:01
am  amp  arduino  digital audio hacks  mp3  radio  tube  

Internet radio occupies an 80-year-old radio case

[Florian Amrhein] made use of some old hardware to build his own internet radio in a 1930′s radio case.

The original hardware is a tube-amplified radio which he picked up on eBay. There’s tons of room in there once he removed the original electronics and that’s a good thing because he crammed a lot of new parts into the build. The main one being an old laptop he had on hand. It’s got a 10″ screen which is too large for the opening, but that ended up being okay. He coded an interface with C and SDL which give him a visual representation of his favorite online streams. The knob to the right moves the red line when turned and causes the Debian box to change to the new stream using the Music Player Daemon. Two potentiometers control the tuning and volume, and there is also a rotary encoder which is not yet in use. All three are connected to the laptop via an Arduino.

Check out the finished product in the video after the break. It sounds quite good thanks to the small automotive speaker and amplifier also crammed into the old case.

If you don’t have a laptop lying around to use in a project like this consider a microcontroller and character LCD based system.


Filed under: digital audio hacks

WiFi RC Car Has Camera and Force Feedback

Here’s some amazing work from maker Blair Kelly:

Arduino Wifly Mini is a remotely operated vehicle that communicates over a WiFi network, can be controlled with an XBOX 360 or PS3 controller, or G27 steering wheel, or any other controller that can be manipulated with Processing’s ProControll library, and features force-feedback and a first-person view. Presently only the G27 wheel and a Logitech F510 controller rumble properly with force-feedback.

My favorite part is that the point-of-view camera inside the car can be set to pan in the direction that you’re steering so that you can see where you’re going. I also love that he implemented force feedback to the controller triggered from sensors on the car. If you’d like to know how he did it all, boy are you in luck. Blair documented this project in incredible detail. Nice work!


MAKE » Arduino 09 May 19:30

Moving to Arduino, and other questions

Hi

I sort of started this question on another page, but I thought I'd move it here so I'm not hijacking someone else's page.

2 questions here;

1: I'm looking to move from using picaxe to Arduino. Can anyone give me any pointers on where to start? (I know this question's probably been asked elsewhere on LMR)

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Let's Make Robots 15 Apr 09:19
arduino  avr  picaxe  radio