Posts with «featured» label

The Wash-A-Lot-Bot is a DIY handwashing timer

With the current coronavirus situation, we’ve been encouraged to wash our hands regularly for 20 seconds – or approximately how long it takes you to hum “Happy Birthday” from beginning to end twice. That sounds easy enough, but do you really do this every time? What you need is some sort of automatic timer, perhaps with a dial gauge for easy visual reference. 

As it just so happens, Gautam Bose and Lucas Ochoa built such a device with an Arduino Uno. The aptly named Wash-A-Lot-Bot detects a person’s hands in front of it via an ultrasonic sensor, then ticks a dial timer from 0 to 20 (or rather 20 to DONE!) using a micro servo. 

This simple setup can be made with little more than scissors and tape, making it a great way to learn about Arduino and programming while you’re stuck indoors.

Arduino Blog 29 Mar 18:07
arduino  featured  uno  

1,156 LEDs make up these dual acrylic light-up panels

What does one do with over 1,000 LEDs, white acrylic, and 288 IR sensors? If you’re Redditor “jordy_essen,” you create an interactive light panel.

In one mode, the user pull a reflective tool across the sensors to draw a paths, with potentiometers implemented to select the color. It can also be set up to play a sort of whack-a-mole game, where one has to activate the sensor in the same area where it illuminates.

For this amazing device, jordy_essen uses not one, or even two, but six Arduino Mega boards to drive the LEDs directly — in turn controlled by a webpage running on a Raspberry Pi. If that wasn’t enough hardware, an Uno is tasked with taking inputs from the color potentiometers. 

It’s a brilliant project in any sense of the word!

Arduino response to the Covid-19 outbreak

For the latest update regarding Arduino’s response to the Covid-19 outbreak please click here.

Priority Service for the Design & Production of Essential Medical and Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

As companies around the globe rapidly react to governments’ calls to produce critical medical equipment like ventilators and PPE, Arduino is prioritizing stock allocation for these urgent needs.

If your company urgently requires any Arduino hardware or software to facilitate the prototyping and production of any equipment or solution to lessen the impact of Covid-19 please contact us.

A dedicated team will work to ensure we support your needs through ensuring the fastest possible delivery (either directly or via sub-distribution) and/or expediting production as required. We will also provide increased levels of design support and help for those designing such critical equipment. 

Tune in to the official Arduino Day 2020 livestream

We’re just hours away from (virtually) celebrating Arduino Day! Join us on Saturday for our official livestream, starting at 2pm CET. We’ll connect with community events from all around the world as well as hear from Arduino team members like Fabio Violante, Massimo Banzi, and David Cuartielles.

Be sure to set a reminder and tune in!

Work remotely with Arduino Create – get a free upgrade now

To help individuals work remotely and share their designs with team members, we’re providing a free 3-month upgrade to the Arduino Create Maker plan to all 1.4 million users of Create as well as new subscribers to the service. With Arduino Create everything is ready to go; there is no need to install libraries and you can quickly share your sketch with teammates via just a URL. 

To gain your free 3-month upgrade* all you need to do is go to Arduino Create choose the “Maker” plan with the default monthly option and enter the voucher code “CREATE4FREE” during the purchase process.

Arduino Create enables users to write code, access content, configure boards and share projects. Features such as an always up-to-date online IDE and the ability to share builds and receive feedback from other facilities means you can work from home efficiently and effectively. If you don’t want to start a project from scratch there’s always the option to tap into the power of the community on the Arduino Project Hub by browsing projects and making them your own. 

The ‘Maker’ plan comes with the added benefits of up to 250 sketches allowed in your sketchbook along with 200MB space to store those sketches and libraries. You can manage more connected objects (5 ‘things’) with up to 20 properties per ‘thing’, enabling the development of complete IoT solutions. Automating processes remotely is further enabled by the Maker plan including access to set up and remotely control 5 of each cloud enabled Arduino board, 3 cloud-enabled Linux devices, and 1 cloud-enabled generic third-party board.

Find out more details about Arduino Create and all the features included in the Maker plan here.

*The ‘free 3-month upgrade to Create Maker is applicable to the monthly plan and is limited to new subscribers only. Voucher code “CREATE4FREE” expires 30th June 2020. 

Please note the first monthly payment will start 3 months after you purchase the plan, and you are able to cancel your subscription at any time.

This acoustic sensing system localizes touch and senses force on everyday surfaces

Researchers from the University of Auckland in New Zealand’s are exploring a new way to construct interactive touch surfaces using finger-mounted audio transducers. 

VersaTouch — which works on everyday surfaces — uses one or more receivers to measure sound waves emanating from the wearer’s “augmented” fingers, allowing it to calculate their positions and/or movements. The plug-and-play system can also sense force based on a changing audio signature and track individual digits by alternating each one’s sonic outputs. 

Importantly, VersaTouch can be configured without permanent modification to the newly interactive surface. The setup includes an Arduino Due to receive signals, a Teensy 3.6 to control the transducers, and a MacBook to process the data and calculate the touch positions with a Java program.

More information on the project can be found in the team’s research paper, and you can see it demonstrated in the video below. 

VersaTouch is a portable, plug-and-play system that uses active acoustic sensing to track fine-grained touch locations as well as touch force of multiple fingers on everyday surfaces without having to permanently instrument them or do an extensive calibration. Our system is versatile in multiple aspects. First, with simple calibration, VersaTouch can be arranged in arbitrary layouts in order to fit into crowded surfaces while retaining its accuracy. Second, various modalities of touch input, such as distance and position, can be supported depending on the number of sensors used to suit the interaction scenario. Third, VersaTouch can sense multi-finger touch, touch force, as well as identify the touch source. Last, VersaTouch is capable of providing vibrotactile feedback to fingertips through the same actuators used for touch sensing.

Thales, Telstra, Microsoft and Arduino deliver scalable trust for easy-to-deploy IoT Applications

We’ve partnered with Thales, Telstra and Microsoft to pave the way for scalable security for connected IoT devices, by implementing a solution that enables trusted and secure end-to-end communication between device and cloud.

The solution enables instant and standardized mutual authentication between a device and a cloud platform via cellular networks, while fully-complying with GSMA IoT SAFE security specifications.

Within the IoT ecosystem, billions of devices collect, process and send data to the cloud, where a range of different IoT services are executed. To enable security, the IoT cloud service must have absolute trust in data received from connected devices. Equally, devices need to trust the cloud. This is only possible if the device and server are mutually authenticated. However, the IoT devices market is so fragmented — with a patchwork of different operating systems and chips being utilized — that security services scalability and duplication are very limited.

That’s why Thales, Telstra, Microsoft[1]and Arduino[2] have decided to team up to work on a solution that addresses the challenge of securely and efficiently connecting IoT devices to clouds in the most simplified way and through cellular networks. The level of trust required is enabled by a sophisticated ‘security-by-design’ approach for any IoT devices based on field-proven and standardized SIM or eSIM technology.

As a result, as soon as an IoT device is switched on, any SIM or eSIM featuring Thales’s IoT SAFE application is automatically and securely provisioned. Once the IoT device gets a proper Digital Certificate created and stored in the SIM/eSIM, then a trusted communication between the device and the server is permitted, in full respect of data integrity and confidentiality.  

We are very pleased to be part of the dream team composed by Thales, Telstra and Microsoft,” said Fabio Violante, Arduino CEO. “The development of this tool was a teamwork and a proof that Arduino is a great partner to create solid, reliable and easy to integrate hardware and software IoT solutions.

[1] Microsoft integrated the IoT SAFE solution with their Azure IoT Hub and also provided Azure Stream Analytics, Cosmos DB and Power BI services to quickly enable the development of an example end-to-end IoT application.

[2] We developed a library (under an open source license) that implements the security mechanism of the GSMA IoT Safe standard on our MKR NB 1500 boards and provides a valid alternative to the usage of the crypto chip already present on the Arduino board. The project has been a great example of collaborations with companies operating in various IoT sectors through our brand new Arduino Pro division.

Arduino CLI: An introduction

It’s been a long time since we first launched our Arduino IDE inspired by the glorious Processing interface, and what started as a Java UI wrapper for build scripts has gone through countless iterations over the past fifteen years.

Some may remember the transition between 1.0 and 1.5, or the application’s icon being replaced, but behind the scenes where many of our users don’t go look, we’ve completely overhauled the way libraries are included, code is cleaned, fail-safe measures are implemented, and a sketch is built.

At the same time our more advanced users have been implementing workarounds to use our internal builder command in their workflows for the most diverse reasons.

Projects have spawned to create Arduino-based makefiles, build scripts, code linters ,and snippets to program their boards using their favorite code editors, and we’ve seen people use Eclipse, Sublime Text, VS Code, Vi(m), Emacs, or even XCode to create Arduino projects.

We keep our eyes peeled when it comes to how our community uses our tools and try as much as possible to learn from it, and this inspired us to get back to the drawing board.

The software that makes up the Arduino platform has grown incrementally over time — new features were added and sometimes the need to quickly factor in those changes did not make it easy to foresee how things would develop years ahead. This led to a situation in which multiple chunks of code and functionalities were spread across different Arduino software products (the Java IDE, the Create Agent, the Web Editor servers, upload/discovery tools, etc.), some of them overlapping or redundant. 

The needs of our community, as well as our own, prompted us to radically rethink our approach and embark on a major refactoring operation with the goal to obtain a single reference implementation: the Arduino Command Line Interface.

As we move forward, all our legacy products are being reworked to use the Arduino CLI as the foundation to build upon.

We believe this effort will provide our users and ourselves with more advanced, flexible tools that we can all benefit from.

How it started

Following an extended period of internal use and exploration, we announced the Arduino CLI alpha preview in August 2018.

From that moment on we concentrated our efforts into adding features, smoothing out some edges, and improving the CLI usability, largely based on users’ feedback from within our community (check out our latest release on GitHub).

A tool to enable advanced workflows

Having a flexible yet simple command line tool providing all the features and flexibility that made Arduino a successful platform can enable users to find new ways of improving their productivity. A great example is how Arduino CLI has been used in Continuous Integration processes, a great example of which came from our friends at TensorFlow, a popular open source machine learning framework. This encouraged us to provide an official Arduino CLI GitHub Action.

This application demonstrates how the Arduino CLI is not just a command line tool, but contains all you need to easily build applications around the Arduino ecosystem. Parse the JSON output of the CLI or implement it as an always-on service that accepts commands via a gRPC interface using your language of choice.

We use gRPC in our Pro IDE and in recent releases of our classic Java IDE.

If you like, you can even use it in your Go application as a library. Our Web Editor services are built using this approach.

How it works

Arduino CLI allows you to replicate the same workflows you are used to with our IDE by using simple commands in a shell, your CI workflow, or wherever you see fit:

  1. Install the board package and your favorite libraries on your PC.
  2. Create a sketch using your favorite editor.
  3. Compile and upload the sketch to your board.

We’re soon going to release our CLI primer to get you all onboard. Check out the trailer below for a sneak peek!

Arduino Blog 13 Mar 09:57

This pair of Arduino glasses stops you from touching your face

Touching your face is a subconscious behavior that we all do, and it is also an easy way to pick up illnesses like the coronavirus and flu. However, like many infectious diseases, proper hygiene can help reduce your risk. With this in mind, Nick Bild designed a simple solution in the form of a modified pair of glasses to provide a subtle reminder not to go near your eyes, mouth, and nose.

The project, which Bild calls Sentinel, consists of an ultrasonic sensor mounted on top of the bridge and an Arduino Nano along the temple. Whenever a hand (or object) is detected in close proximity to the face, a red warning LED lights up in the wearer’s peripheral vision.

Start a 1976 Jeep with voice commands using a MacBook and an Arduino

After being given a 2009 MacBook, John Forsyth decided to use it to start a 1976 Jeep via voice control.

The build uses the laptop’s Enhanced Dictation functionality to convert text into speech, and when a Python program receives the proper keywords, it sends an “H” character over serial to an Arduino Uno to activate the vehicle.

The Uno uses a transistor to control a 12V relay, which passes current to the Jeep’s starter solenoid. After a short delay, the MacBook then transmits an “L” command to have it release the relay, ready to do the job again when needed!

As a fan of Iron Man, Forsyth channeled his inner Tony Stark and even programmed the system to respond to “JARVIS, let’s get things going!”