Posts with «maker» label

Make:cast – To Maker Faire Rome with Love

Italians have a love of innovation and design and it shows at Maker Faire Rome. In this episode of Make:Cast, I look back at Maker Faire Rome in October 2019 during a pre-Covid time when live events could happen. I was guided through Maker Faire Rome by Alessandro Ranellucci, the curator of Maker Faire Rome, along with Massimo Banzi, co-founder of Arduino. Maker Faire Rome 2020 is happening as a virtual event this weekend.

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The post Make:cast – To Maker Faire Rome with Love appeared first on Make: DIY Projects and Ideas for Makers.

HardWino Takes The Effort Out of Happy Hour

A personal bartender is hard to come by these days. What has the world come to when a maker has to build their own? [Pierre Charlier] can lend you a helping hand vis-à-vis with HardWino, an open-source cocktail maker.

The auto-bar is housed on a six-slot, rotating beverage holder, controlled by an Arduino Mega and accepts drink orders via a TFT screen. Stepper motors and L298 driver boards are supported on 3D printed parts and powered by a standard 12V DC jack. Assembling HardWino is a little involved, so [Charlier]  has provided a thorough step-by-step process in the video after the break.

[Charlier] has also kindly included his Arduino code to further facilitate your happy hour. The best part? This is isn’t even the final product; and yet — this functional prototype can already turn the tables on a long day. Whatever your beverage of choice, make sure it stays as hot or cool as you want with the help of this handy coaster.


Filed under: 3d Printer hacks, Arduino Hacks

Create Big Music Mashups on This Enormous MIDI Sequencer Board

A picture might be worth a thousand words, but for an interactive sound work called GRIDI a picture is worth infinite midi loops!

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The post Create Big Music Mashups on This Enormous MIDI Sequencer Board appeared first on Make: DIY Projects, How-Tos, Electronics, Crafts and Ideas for Makers.

Pay Humble Bundle $15, get $276 worth of maker know-how

Humble Bundle unveiled its latest book pack on Wednesday and, hoo boy, is it a doozy. The pay-what-you-want charity is teaming up with Make for a huge book pack that teaches the basics of Arduino and Pi programming. Pay anything you want for six Maker handbooks geared towards amateur roboticists. Throw down more than the current $10 average and Humble Bundle will double that figure to include a full dozen titles as well as a $5 - $10 discount off a year of Maker Magazine. You can also round out the deal for $15 total and receive two more titles -- Make: Sensors and Making Things Talk. Proceeds from these sales will benefit Maker Ed.

[Image Credit: Getty]

Source: Humble Bundle

Engadget 03 Dec 07:02

Pay Humble Bundle $15, get $276 worth of maker know-how

Humble Bundle unveiled its latest book pack on Wednesday and, hoo boy, is it a doozy. The pay-what-you-want charity is teaming up with Make for a huge book pack that teaches the basics of Arduino and Pi programming. Pay anything you want for six Maker handbooks geared towards amateur roboticists. Throw down more than the current $10 average and Humble Bundle will double that figure to include a full dozen titles as well as a $5 - $10 discount off a year of Maker Magazine. You can also round out the deal for $15 total and receive two more titles -- Make: Sensors and Making Things Talk. Proceeds from these sales will benefit Maker Ed.

[Image Credit: Getty]

Engadget 03 Dec 07:02

Pay Humble Bundle $15, get $276 worth of maker know-how

Humble Bundle unveiled its latest book pack on Wednesday and, hoo boy, is it a doozy. The pay-what-you-want charity is teaming up with Make for a huge book pack that teaches the basics of Arduino and Pi programming. Pay anything you want for six Maker handbooks geared towards amateur roboticists. Throw down more than the current $10 average and Humble Bundle will double that figure to include a full dozen titles as well as a $5 - $10 discount off a year of Maker Magazine. You can also round out the deal for $15 total and receive two more titles -- Make: Sensors and Making Things Talk. Proceeds from these sales will benefit Maker Ed.

[Image Credit: Getty]

Source: Humble Bundle

Engadget 03 Dec 07:02

Interview: NIcole Grimwood on Electronics (and Cake)

Nicole Grimwood is working towards a dual degree in engineering from Columbia University and liberal arts from Scripps College.

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The post Interview: NIcole Grimwood on Electronics (and Cake) appeared first on Make: DIY Projects, How-Tos, Electronics, Crafts and Ideas for Makers.

This Arduino Basic Kit has everything a newbie maker could ask for

It's easy to think about tinkering around with Arduino, but take more than 30 seconds to look at the platform, and suddenly it becomes daunting: not only do you need an Arduino itself, but to get started you need resisters, wires, LEDs, screens and a host of other components that are almost always sold separately. Have no fear, newbies: there's a new Arduino Basic Kit in town, and it has all the spare parts a beginner could want.

Source: 123D Circuits

Engadget 29 Jul 04:31
arduino  build  diy  maker  misc  projects  

This Arduino Basic Kit has everything a newbie maker could ask for

It's easy to think about tinkering around with Arduino, but take more than 30 seconds to look at the platform, and suddenly it becomes daunting: not only do you need an Arduino itself, but to get started you need resisters, wires, LEDs, screens and a host of other components that are almost always sold separately. Have no fear, newbies: there's a new Arduino Basic Kit in town, and it has all the spare parts a beginner could want.

Filed under: Misc

Comments

Source: 123D Circuits

Engadget 29 Jul 04:31
arduino  build  diy  maker  misc  projects  

Bread Online is a Bread Maker for the Internet of Things

An engineering student at the University of Western Macedonia has just added another appliance to the ever-growing list of Internet enabled things. [Panagiotis] decided to modify an off-the-shelf bread maker to enable remote control via the Internet.

[Panagiotis] had to remove pretty much all of the original control circuitry for this device. The original controller was replaced with an Arduino Uno R3 and an Ethernet shield. The temperature sensor also needed to be replaced, since [Panagiotis] could not find any official documentation describing the specifications of the original. Luckily, the heating element and mixer motor were able to be re-used.

A few holes were drilled into the case to make room for the Ethernet connector as well as a USB connector. Two relays were used to allow the Arduino to switch the heating element and mixer motor on and off. The front panel of the bread maker came with a simple LCD screen and a few control buttons. Rather than let those go to waste, they were also wired into the Arduino.

The Arduino bread maker can be controlled via a web site that runs on a separate server. The website is coded with PHP and runs on Apache. It has a simple interface that allows the user to specify several settings including how much bread is being cooked as well as the desired darkness of the bread. The user can then schedule the bread maker to start. Bread Online also comes with an “offline” mode so that it can be used locally without the need for a computer or web browser. Be sure to check out the video demonstration below.

[Thanks Minas]


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, cooking hacks