Motion Activated LED Strip

GoalThere are stairs up to where I live and during the winter and at night they can be treacherous. I wanted an easy method to illuminate the stairs — imagine your hands are full of groceries — while also not having to go back and turn them off.OverviewBasically I ran an LED strip down the railing o...
By: loonison101

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Instructables 20 Feb 02:43

An Affordable Phone Controlled Rover

A while back Jason made a phone controlled rover using the MotorAir. He wanted to revisit the basic idea but using cheaper, more widely available parts. Also since this is Arduino based, it is a great springboard for more than just a rover that drives around. You could add sensors, servos, etc. to really drive this project in any direction you want.

https://youtu.be/Qx0tvpr2DNw

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Let's Make Robots 19 Feb 22:38

This 3D Printed Arduino-Based Hexapod Robot Can Bust a Move!

Check out the sick moves on this open-source, 3D-printable hexapod robot.

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The post This 3D Printed Arduino-Based Hexapod Robot Can Bust a Move! appeared first on Make: DIY Projects and Ideas for Makers.

Levitate water drops with RGB LEDs and Arduino

Water normally falls from the sky to the ground, the time fountain from hacker isaac879 appears to work much differently. As shown in the video below, water droplets somehow levitate from a circular orange apparatus to a blue one on top.

The trick here is that the water isn’t actually falling up, but appears that way by carefully controlling the flashing of RGB lights using an Arduino Uno. If the lights flash at the same rate as the water drops, they appear to stand still, while if the light is flashed more slowly, they appear to rise.

This is the prototype RGB LED Time Fountain I designed and built. It uses RGB LED strip lights to strobe a stream of water drops to make them appear as if they are levitating. By strobing the different colors out of phase with each other some incredible effects can be created.

An Arduino Uno controls the timing of the RGB strobe and the PWM of the pump. Bluetooth communication was achieved using an HC-05 Bluetooth module and the “Arduino bluetooth controller” app by “Giumig Apps.”

Be sure to check out the video to see it in action, especially the bit around 3:40 where drops appear to rise out of a cup while it’s getting filled with water.

Handheld GPS Tracks All The Things

With a GPS on every smartphone, one would be forgiven for forgetting that handheld GPS units still exist. Seeking to keep accurate data on a few upcoming trips, [_Traveler] took on a custom-build that resulted in this GPS data logger.

Keeping tabs on [_Traveler] is a Ublox M8N GPS which is on full-time, logging data every 30 seconds, for up  to 2.5 days. All data is saved to an SD card, with an ESP32 to act as a brain and make downloading the info more accessible via WiFi . While tracking the obvious — like position, speed, and time — this data logger also displays temperature, elevation, dawn and dusk, on an ePaper screen which is a great choice for conserving battery.

The prototyping process is neat on this one. The first complete build used point-to-point soldering on a protoboard to link several breakout modules together. After that, a PCB design embraces the same modules, with a footprint for the ESP’s castellated edges and header footprints for USB charing board, SD card board, ePaper, etc. All of this finds a hope in a 3D printed enclosure. After a fair chunk of time coding in the Arduino IDE the logger is ready for [_Traveler]’s next excursion!

As far as power consumption in the field, [_Traveler] says the GPS takes a few moments to get a proper location — with the ESP chewing through battery life all the while — and plans to tinker with it in shorter order.

Not all GPS trackers are created equal: sometimes all you need is a stripped-down tracker for your jog, or to know exactly where every pothole is along your route.

[Via /r/electronics]

Hack a Day 19 Feb 19:31
arduino  esp32  gps  gps hacks  handheld  travel  

Play Striker Air Hockey on a capacitive touch surface

After discovering capacitive touch interactions with a Makey Makey device and an Arduino Leonardo, Jason Eldred realized it could also be used to control the Unity game engine. After a night of hacking, he had a basic interface that could change the scale of a virtual circle. From there, he teamed up with Alex L. Bennett to produce an art installation called Bee that invited users to interact with it by physically touching a panel to change graphics on the panel itself and a screen in front of them.

While not meant as a game per se, after more experimentation including work by Gabe Miller and Dustin Williams, this interactive display method was finally turned into a virtual air hockey table via a giant crisscrossing grid of copper tape and wires.

In the game, two players push a virtual puck projected onto a horizontal surface for colorful AR interactions at a very low cost. You can see it in action below, and read more about the project on DigiPen’s website and in Gamasutra’s recent article.

Turning A Car Into A Computer Mouse

[William Osman] and [Simone Giertz] have graced our pages before, both with weird, wacky and wonderful hacks so it’s no surprise that when they got together they did so to turn Simone’s car into a computer mouse. It’s trickier than you might think.

They started by replacing the lens of an optical mouse with a lens normally used for a security camera. Surprisingly, when mounted to the car’s front bumper it worked! But it wasn’t ideal. The problem lies in that to move a mouse cursor sideways you have to move the mouse sideways. However, cars don’t move sideways, they turn by going in an arc. Move your mouse in an arc right now without giving it any sideways motion and see what happens. The mouse cursor on the screen moves vertically up or down the screen, but not left or right. So how to tell if the car is turning? For that, they added a magnetometer. The mouse then gives the distance the car moved and the magnetometer gives the heading, or angle. With some simple trigonometry, they calculate the car’s coordinates.

The mouse click is done using the car’s horn, but details are vague there.

And yes, using the carmouse is as fun as it sounds, though we still don’t recommend texting while driving using this technique. Watch them in the videos below as they write an email and drive a self-portrait of the car.

A perhaps safer but equally fun approach is to turn your car into a game controller by tapping into the car’s CAN bus and converting the steering wheel, peddle and other messages into joystick commands.

Hack a Day 19 Feb 03:00

WeMos D1 and D1 Mini Arduino Projects

null null null Arduino RFID Reader / MFRC522 Turorial WiFi / Internet Controlled Relays Using ESP8266 - Quick, 30 Minutes IoT Project LCD DISPLAY INTERFACE WITH ARDUINO Low Cost IR Decoder DIY: a 5 Minutes Arduino Voltmeter With an OLED Display Tutorial to Use Infr...
By: Billd39ET

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Instructables 19 Feb 00:56

Nokia 5110 LCD for Arduino

Cheap Nokia 5110 Displays for use in Arduino projects. Arduino Menu on a Nokia 5110 Lcd Using a Rotary Encoder How to Use NOKIA 5110 LCD Screen With Arduino Display Live Arduino Sensor Readings on a Nokia 5110 LCD DIY Distance Meter With Arduino and a Nokia 5110 Display Nokia 5110 ...
By: Billd39ET

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Instructables 19 Feb 00:48

Koffiemachine

In deze instructable gaan we een koffiemachine maken die je kan besturen met een app.Als basis gebruiken we een reeds bestaande koffiemachine en een arduino.De benodigdheden voor dit project:- koffiemachine- arduino- bluetooth-module (HC-05)- real-time-clock-module (DS3231)- kabels voor arduino (m-m...
By: anserron

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Instructables 18 Feb 22:07