Posts with «internet» label

ICYMI: CERNs robotic inspectors ride a monorail

Today on In Case You Missed It: Pairing an Arduino with a skateboard produces the Sick Ollie Machine, capable of measuring angular and X-,Y- or Z-axis accelerations to measure who is hitting their tricks the hardest. Courtesy of Josh Sheldon, the ollie machine uses an Arduino beneath the trucks of the board paired with a relay to measure the stats of each trick. Those who are producing truly sick ollies are rewarded with a chime from the attached cowbell.

Meanwhile, over at CERN a set of robot twins have been enlisted to provide live video feeds and environmental measurements for the massive underground complex. The robots, called TIM twins for Train Inspection Monorail, move along a -- you guessed it -- overhead rail that runs throughout the facility in order to monitor stats like oxygen concentration and radiation emissions.

Also, don't forget to check out what happens when a frog is run through Google's Deep Dream project (which is easily the weirdest sentence I've written yet today). As always, please share any interesting tech or science videos you find by using the #ICYMI hashtag on Twitter for @mskerryd.

Machine turns your Twitter posts into tasty cocktails

Ever wondered what your tweets would taste like if you could distill them into a drink? Probably not, but there's now a way to find out. Clément Gault and Koi Koi Design have whipped up Data Cocktail, an Arduino-powered machine that creates a drink based on Twitter updates. In its current incarnation, it looks for the five latest tweets mentioning keywords linked to ingredients, and fills the glass accordingly. The result is an original, spur-of-the-moment mix -- it'll even print out the 'recipe' (really, a ratio of the keywords) and thank the users who unwittingly contributed to the beverage.

Via: The Creators Project

Source: Data Cocktail

Machine turns your Twitter posts into tasty cocktails

Ever wondered what your tweets would taste like if you could distill them into a drink? Probably not, but there's now a way to find out. Clément Gault and Koi Koi Design have whipped up Data Cocktail, an Arduino-powered machine that creates a drink based on Twitter updates. In its current incarnation, it looks for the five latest tweets mentioning keywords linked to ingredients, and fills the glass accordingly. The result is an original, spur-of-the-moment mix -- it'll even print out the 'recipe' (really, a ratio of the keywords) and thank the users who unwittingly contributed to the beverage.

Via: The Creators Project

Source: Data Cocktail

ICYMI: Becoming Thor, the future of beekeeping and more

Today on In Case You Missed It: The FlowHive is a new bee colony rig that allows beekeepers to tap the honey easily by cranking open the honeycomb design, creating a channel down to the spout. Japanese inventors created a throwable robot that flies through the air as a sphere, then unfurls four legs to scuttle its way onward. And maker Alan Phan re-created the God Hammer aka Mjolnir aka Thor's cool hammer-- with an Arduino-controlled fingerprint scanner and a super-charged electromagnet.

ICYMI: Becoming Thor, the future of beekeeping and more

Today on In Case You Missed It: The FlowHive is a new bee colony rig that allows beekeepers to tap the honey easily by cranking open the honeycomb design, creating a channel down to the spout. Japanese inventors created a throwable robot that flies through the air as a sphere, then unfurls four legs to scuttle its way onward. And maker Alan Phan re-created the God Hammer aka Mjolnir aka Thor's cool hammer-- with an Arduino-controlled fingerprint scanner and a super-charged electromagnet.

Weather Reporter - Temboo, Ethernet and Arduino


 

Arduino is well known for the large variety of sensors / modules that can be connected. It is quite easy to hook up a temperature or humidity sensor to get instant feedback about the surrounding environmental conditions. However, sometimes you do not have a temperature sensor. Sometimes you have a sensor, but would like to know the temperature in other cities ! Or you would like to know what the temperature will be tomorrow?

Well now you can !!

All you need is a Temboo account, an internet connection and the following components:

Parts Required


 
 

Project Description


An Arduino UNO (and Ethernet Shield) queries Yahoo using a Temboo account, and retrieves weather information. The data is filtered and processed, and then passed on to another Arduino UNO to be displayed on a TFT LCD module. Two Arduino UNOs are used because the Ethernet library and the UTFT library are both memory hungry, and together consume more memory than one Arduino UNO can handle. Yes - I could have used a different board such as the Arduino MEGA, but where is the fun in that ?? This project will teach you many things:
  • How to use an Ethernet Shield with a Temboo account to retrieve internet data
  • How to use a TFT LCD module (ITDB02-1.8SP)
  • How to reduce memory consumption when using the UTFT library
  • How to power two Arduinos with a single USB cable
  • How to transmit data from one Arduino to another (via jumper wires)
All of this and a whole lot more !!


 
 

Video

Have a look at the following video to see the project in action.
 




You will need to create a Temboo account to run this project:

Temboo Account Creation

Step 1:

Visit the Temboo website : https://www.temboo.com/ Create an account by entering a valid email address. Then click on the Sign Up button.

 

 

Step 2:

Verify your email address by clicking on the link provided in the email sent by Temboo.

 

Step 3:

You will be directed to the account setup page: Create an Account Name, and Password for future access to your Temboo Account Check the terms of service and if you agree, then tick the box Press the Go! button

 

 

Step 4:

You will then encounter the "Welcome!" screen:

 

 

Step 5:

Navigate to the top right of the screen and select the LIBRARY tab

 

 

Step 6:

On the left hand side you will see a list of choreos. Type Yahoo into the search box on the top left of the screen. Navigate to the GetWeatherByAddress Choreo by clicking on...     Yahoo _ Weather _ GetWeatherByAddress

 

 

Step 7:

Turn the IoT Mode to ON (in the top right of screen)

 

 

Step 8:

What's your platform / device? : Arduino How is it connected? : Arduino Ethernet   The following popup box will appear:

 

 

Step 9:

Name: EthernetShield - you can choose any name. Letters and numbers only. No spaces. Shield Type: Arduino Ethernet MAC Address : You can normally find the MAC address of the Ethernet shield on the underside. Enter the MAC address without the hyphens. Then click SAVE.

 

 

Step 10:

Move to the INPUT section. Enter the Address of the place you want the Temperature for. Address = Perth, Western Australia Expand the Optional INPUT for extra functionality Units = c - If you want the temperature in Celcius.

 

 

Step 11:

This will automatically generate some Arduino CODE and a HEADER FILE. Don't worry about the Arduino code for now... because I will provide that for you. However, you will need the automatically generated HEADER file. I will show you what to do with that soon. So don't lose it !'



Temboo Library Install

The Temboo library will need to be installed before you copy the Arduino code in the sections below. To install the Temboo library into your Arduino IDE, please follow the link to their instructions:   Installing the Temboo Arduino Library

   

UTFT Library Install

Download the UTFT library from this site: http://www.henningkarlsen.com/electronics/library.php?id=51 Once downloaded and extracted. Go into the UTFT folder and look for the memorysaver.h file. Open this file in a text editor, and "uncomment" all of the TFT modules that are not relevant to this project. I disabled all of the TFT modules except the last 3 (which made reference to ST7735) - see picture below. The TFT module we are using in this project is the ITDB02-1.8SP from ITEAD Studio. Save the memorysaver.h file, and then IMPORT the library into the Arduino IDE as per the normal library import procedure.   If you do not modify the memorysaver.h file, the Arduino SLAVE sketch will not compile.

   

Arduino Code (MASTER)

  This project uses 2 Arduino UNOs. One will be the Master, and one will be the Slave. The following code is for the Arduino MASTER.   Open up the Arduino IDE. (I am using Arduino IDE version 1.6) Paste the following code into the Arduino IDE code window.   PLEASE NOTE: You may need to change some of the lines to accomodate your INPUTS from step 10. Have a look around line 36 and 37.  
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/* ===============================================================================
      Project: Weather Reporter: Temboo, Ethernet, Arduino
        Title: ARDUINO MASTER: Get temperature from Yahoo using Temboo
       Author: Scott C
      Created: 27th February 2015
  Arduino IDE: 1.6.0
      Website: http://arduinobasics.blogspot.com/p/arduino-basics-projects-page.html
  Description: The following sketch was designed for the Arduino MASTER device. 
               It will retrieve temperature/weather information from Yahoo using your
               Temboo account (https://www.temboo.com/), which will then be sent to the
               Arduino Slave device to be displayed on a TFT LCD module.
               
   Libraries : Ethernet Library (that comes with Arduino IDE)
               Temboo Arduino Library - https://www.temboo.com/sdk/arduino
               
   Temboo Library installation instructions for Arduino: 
               https://www.temboo.com/arduino/others/library-installation

  You will also need to copy your Temboo Account information into a new tab and call it TembooAccount.h.
  Please follow the instructions on the ArduinoBasics blog for more information.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------- */

#include <SPI.h>
#include <Dhcp.h>
#include <Dns.h>
#include <Ethernet.h>
#include <EthernetClient.h>
#include <Temboo.h>
#include "TembooAccount.h" // Contains Temboo account information - in a new tab.
#include <Wire.h>

byte ethernetMACAddress[] = ETHERNET_SHIELD_MAC; //ETHERNET_SHIELD_MAC variable located in TembooAccount.h
EthernetClient client;

String Address = "Perth, Western Australia"; // Find temperature for Perth, Western Australia
String Units = "c"; // Display the temperature in degrees Celcius

String ForeCastDay[7]; //String Array to hold the day of the week
String ForeCastTemp[7]; //String Array to hold the temperature for that day of week.

int counter1=0; //Counters used in FOR-LOOPS.
int counter2=0;

boolean downloadTemp = true; // A boolean variable which controls when to query Yahoo for Temperature information.



void setup() {
  Wire.begin(); // join i2c bus : Used to communicate to the Arduino SLAVE device.
 
  // Ethernet shield must initialise properly to continue with sketch.
  if (Ethernet.begin(ethernetMACAddress) == 0) {
    while(true);
  }
  
  //Provide some time to get both Arduino's ready for Temperature Query.
    delay(2000);
}




void loop() {
  if (downloadTemp) {
    downloadTemp=false; //Stop Arduino from Querying Temboo repeatedly
    getTemperature();       //Retrieve Temperature data from Yahoo
    transmitResults();      //Transmit the temperature results to the Slave Arduino
  }
}




/* This function will Query Yahoo for Temperature information (using a Temboo account) */

void getTemperature(){
    TembooChoreo GetWeatherByAddressChoreo(client);

    // Invoke the Temboo client
    GetWeatherByAddressChoreo.begin();

    // Set Temboo account credentials
    GetWeatherByAddressChoreo.setAccountName(TEMBOO_ACCOUNT); //TEMBOO_ACCOUNT variable can be found in TembooAccount.h file or tab
    GetWeatherByAddressChoreo.setAppKeyName(TEMBOO_APP_KEY_NAME); //TEMBOO_APP_KEY_NAME variable can be found in TembooAccount.h file or tab
    GetWeatherByAddressChoreo.setAppKey(TEMBOO_APP_KEY); //TEMBOO_APP_KEY variable can be found in TembooAccount.h file or tab

    // Set Choreo inputs
    GetWeatherByAddressChoreo.addInput("Units", Units); // Set the Units to Celcius
    GetWeatherByAddressChoreo.addInput("Address", Address); // Set the Weather Location to Perth, Western Australia

    // Identify the Choreo to run
    GetWeatherByAddressChoreo.setChoreo("/Library/Yahoo/Weather/GetWeatherByAddress");

    // This output filter will extract the expected temperature for today
    GetWeatherByAddressChoreo.addOutputFilter("Temperature", "/rss/channel/item/yweather:condition/@temp", "Response");
    
    // These output filters will extract the forecasted temperatures (we need to know the day and temperature for that day)
    GetWeatherByAddressChoreo.addOutputFilter("ForeCastDay", "/rss/channel/item/yweather:forecast/@day", "Response");
    GetWeatherByAddressChoreo.addOutputFilter("ForeCastHigh", "/rss/channel/item/yweather:forecast/@high", "Response");

    // Run the Choreo;
    GetWeatherByAddressChoreo.run();

    //Reset our counters before proceeding
    counter1 = 0;
    counter2 = 0;
    
    while(GetWeatherByAddressChoreo.available()) {
      // This will get the first part of the output
      String name = GetWeatherByAddressChoreo.readStringUntil('\x1F');
      name.trim(); // get rid of newlines

      // This will get the second part of the output
      String data = GetWeatherByAddressChoreo.readStringUntil('\x1E');
      data.trim(); // get rid of newlines

      //Fill the String Arrays with the Temperature/Weather data
      if (name == "Temperature") {
        ForeCastDay[counter1] = "Today";
        ForeCastTemp[counter2] = data;
        counter1++;
        counter2++;
      }
      
      if(name=="ForeCastDay"){
        ForeCastDay[counter1] = data;
        counter1++;
      }
      
      if(name=="ForeCastHigh"){
        ForeCastTemp[counter2] = data;
        counter2++;
      }
    }
  
    //Close the connection to Temboo website
    GetWeatherByAddressChoreo.close();
  }
  
  
  
  
  /* This function is used to transmit the temperature data to the Slave Arduino */
  
  void transmitResults(){
    char tempData[10];
    int tempStringLength = 0;
    
    //Modify the current temp to "Now"
    ForeCastDay[0] = "Now";
    
    //Send * to Slave Arduino to prepare for Temperature Transmission
    Wire.beginTransmission(4); // Transmit to device #4 (Slave Arduino)
    Wire.write("*");
    delay(500);
    Wire.endTransmission();
    delay(500);
    
    //Send the temperatures on the Slave Arduino to be displayed on the TFT module.
    for (int j=0; j<20; j++){
      for (int i=0; i<6; i++){
        memset(tempData,0,sizeof(tempData));   //Clear the character array
        String tempString = String(ForeCastDay[i] + "," + ForeCastTemp[i] + ".");
        tempStringLength = tempString.length();
        tempString.toCharArray(tempData, tempStringLength+1);
        Wire.beginTransmission(4); // Transmit to device #4 (Slave Arduino)
        Wire.write(tempData);
        delay(1000);
        Wire.endTransmission();
        delay(4000);
      }
    }
    
    /* ----------------------------------------------------------------------
    // You can use this to send temperature results to the Serial Monitor.
    // However, you will need a Serial.begin(9600); statement in setup().
    
    Serial.println("The Current Temperature is " + ForeCastTemp[5] + " C");
    Serial.println();
    Serial.println("The Expected Temperature for");
    for (int i=0; i<5; i++){
      Serial.println(ForeCastDay[i] + " : " + ForeCastTemp[i] + " C");
    }
    ---------------------------------------------------------- */
  }
  

 
 
 
Select "New Tab" from the drop-down menu on the top right of the IDE. Name the file: TembooAccount.h

Paste the contents of the HEADER file from the Temboo webpage (Step 11 above) into the TembooAccount.h tab. If you do not have the TembooAccount.h tab with the contents of this HEADER file next to your Arduino Master sketch, then it will NOT work.  
Make sure to SAVE the Arduino Sketch and upload the code to the Arduino (MASTER)

   

Arduino Code (SLAVE)

  This project uses 2 Arduino UNOs. One will be the Master, and one will be the Slave. The following code is for the Arduino SLAVE.   Make sure to disconnect the Arduino MASTER from your computer, and keep it to one side. Connect the Arduino SLAVE to your computer, and upload the following code to it. Make sure to create a new sketch for this code (File _ New).  
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/* ===============================================================================
      Project: Weather Reporter: Temboo, Ethernet, Arduino
        Title: ARDUINO SLAVE: Display temperature on TFT LCD Module
       Author: Scott C
      Created: 27th February 2015
  Arduino IDE: 1.6.0
      Website: http://arduinobasics.blogspot.com/p/arduino-basics-projects-page.html
  Description: The following sketch was designed for the Arduino SLAVE device. 
               It will receive temperature information from the Arduino MASTER
               and then display this information on the ITDB02-1.8SP TFT LCD 
               Module. Please read the important notes below.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
NOTES:
This sketch makes use of the UTFT.h library from : 
http://www.henningkarlsen.com/electronics/library.php?id=51
Please note: You will need to modify the memorysaver.h file in the UTFT folder 
with a text editor to disable any unused TFT modules. This will save memory, 
and allow you to run this sketch on an Arduino UNO. I disabled all TFT modules in
that file except the last 3 (which made reference to ST7735).
I used a ITDB02-1.8SP TFT LCD Module from ITEAD Studio.
PinOut:

Arduino SLAVE      ITDB02-1.8SP TFT
         3.3V ---- VDD33
 Digital9 (D9)---- CS
 Digital8 (D8)---- SCL
 Digital7 (D7)---- SDA
 Digital6 (D6)---- RS
 Digital5 (D5)---- RST
          GND ---- GND
           5V ---- VIN

Usage: UTFT myGLCD(<model code>, SDA, SCL, CS, RST, RS);
Example: UTFT myGLCD(ITDB18SP,7,8,9,5,6);

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
This sketch also makes use of the Wire.h library. 
The Wire.h library comes with the Arduino IDE.
This enables communication between Arduino Master and Arduino Slave.
PinOut:

Arduino MASTER      Arduino SLAVE
   Analog4(A4) ---- Analog4 (A4) 
   Analog5(A5) ---- Analog5 (A5) 
           GND ---- GND

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Arduino Slave is powered by the Arduino Master:
PinOut:

Arduino MASTER      Arduino SLAVE
            5V ---- VIN

==================================================================================
*/

#include <UTFT.h>
#include <Wire.h>

//Declare all of the fonts
extern uint8_t SmallFont[];
extern uint8_t BigFont[];
extern uint8_t SevenSegNumFont[];

// Usage: UTFT myGLCD(<model code>, SDA, SCL, CS, RST, RS);
UTFT myGLCD(ITDB18SP,7,8,9,5,6);

boolean tempDisplay = false; //Helps with processing the data from the Arduino MASTER
boolean readTemp = false; //Helps to differentiate the day from the temperature values
String dayOfWeek=""; //Variable used to hold the Day of the Week
String tempReading=""; //Variable used to hold the Temperature for that day

String Units = "'C "; //Display Temperature in Celcius
String Address = "Perth, WA"; //Address to show at top of Display


void setup(){
  // Initialise the TFT LCD
  myGLCD.InitLCD();
  initialiseLCD();
  delay(5000);
  
  //Setup the Serial communication between the Arduino MASTER and SLAVE
  Wire.begin(4); // join i2c bus with address #4
  Wire.onReceive(receiveEvent); // register event
}



void loop(){
  delay(50);
}


/*
  This function initialises the TFT LCD, and draws the initial screen.
*/
void initialiseLCD(){
  //Clear the screen
  myGLCD.clrScr();
  
  //Draw the borders (top and bottom)
  myGLCD.setColor(25, 35, 4);
  myGLCD.fillRect(0, 0, 159, 13);
  myGLCD.fillRect(0, 114, 159, 127);
  myGLCD.drawLine(0,18,159,18);
  myGLCD.drawLine(0,109,159,109);
  
  //Header and Footer Writing
  myGLCD.setColor(255, 255, 255);
  myGLCD.setBackColor(25, 35, 4);
  myGLCD.setFont(SmallFont);
  myGLCD.print("arduinobasics", CENTER, 1);
  myGLCD.print("blogspot.com", CENTER, 114);
}




/* This function executes whenever data is received from Arduino master
   It will ignore all data from the Master until it receives a '*' character.
   Once this character is received, it will call the receiveTemp() function
   in order to receive Temperature data from the Arduino Master.
*/
void receiveEvent(int howMany){
  if(tempDisplay){
    receiveTemp();
  }else{
    while(0 < Wire.available()){
      char c = Wire.read(); // receive byte as a character
      if(c=='*'){ // Searching for a '*' character
        tempDisplay=true; // If '*' received, then call receiveTemp() function
      }
    }
  }
}



/* This function is used to receive and process the Temperature data 
   from the Arduino Master and pass it on to the  displayTemp() funtion.
*/
void receiveTemp(){
  tempReading="";
  dayOfWeek = "";
  
  while(0 < Wire.available()){
    char c = Wire.read(); // receive byte as a character
    if(readTemp){
      if(c=='.'){ // If a . is detected. It is the end of the line.
        readTemp=false;
      }else{
        tempReading=tempReading+c;
      }
    }else{
      if(c==','){
      } else {
        dayOfWeek=dayOfWeek+c;
      }
    }
    if(c==','){
      readTemp=true;
    }
  }
  displayTemp();
}



/*
  Display the Temperature readings on the TFT LCD screen.
*/
void displayTemp(){
  //Clear the writing on top and bottom of screen
  myGLCD.setColor(25, 35, 4);
  myGLCD.fillRect(0, 0, 159, 13);
  myGLCD.fillRect(0, 114, 159, 127);
  
  //Small writing on top and bottom of screen
  myGLCD.setColor(255, 255, 255);
  myGLCD.setBackColor(25, 35, 4);
  myGLCD.setFont(SmallFont);
  myGLCD.print(Address, CENTER, 1);
  myGLCD.print(dayOfWeek, CENTER, 114);
  
  //Write the big temperature reading in middle of screen
  myGLCD.setBackColor(0, 0, 0);
  myGLCD.setFont(SevenSegNumFont);
  myGLCD.print(tempReading, CENTER, 40);
  
  //Write the Units next to the temperature reading
  myGLCD.setFont(BigFont);
  myGLCD.print(Units, RIGHT, 40);
}

 
 
 

Wiring it up

Once the code has been uploaded to both Arduinos (Master and Slave), I tend to label each Arduino so that I don't mix them up. You will notice an 'S' marked on the SLAVE in some of the photos/videos. Then it is time to piggy-back the shields onto the Arduinos and wire them up. Make sure you disconnect the USB cable from the Arduinos before you start doing this.

 

Step 1: Ethernet Shield

Place the Ethernet shield onto the Arduino MASTER. Connect an Ethernet cable (RJ45) to the Ethernet shield. The other end will connect to your internet router.

 
 

Step 2: Arduino SLAVE and TFT LCD module

 
You can either wire up the TFT LCD module on a breadboard, or you can use a ProtoShield with mini-breadboard. It doesn't really matter how you hook it up, but make sure you double check the connections and the TFT specifications before you power it up. I have powered the Arduino Slave by connecting it to the Arduino Master (see fritzing sketch below).  
There is no reason why you couldn't just power the slave seperately. In fact this is probably the safer option. But I read that this power-sharing setup was ok, so I wanted to give it a go. I have no idea whether it would be suitable for a long term power project... so use it at your own risk. I tried using 4 x AA batteries to power this circuit, but found that the LCD screen would flicker. So then I tried a 9V battery, and noticed that the 5V voltage regulator was heating up more than I felt comfortable with. In the end, I settled with the USB option, and had no further issues. I am sure there are other possible options, and feel free to mention them in the comments below.  
Use the following fritzing sketch and tables to help you wire this circuit up.

 

Fritzing sketch

 

 
 

 

Arduino MASTER to SLAVE connection table

 

 
 

 

Arduino SLAVE to ITDB02-1.8SP TFT LCD

 

 
 

ITDB02-1.8SP TFT LCD Module Pictures

 

 

 
 

Project Pictures

 

 

 

 



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Arduino Thermostat Includes Vacation Mode

When [William’s] thermostat died, he wanted an upgrade. He found a few off-the-shelf Internet enabled thermostats, but they were all very expensive. He knew he could build his own for a fraction of the cost.

The primary unit synchronizes it’s time using NTP. This automatically keeps things up to date and in sync with daylight savings time. There is also a backup real-time clock chip in case the Internet connection is lost. The unit can be controlled via the physical control panel, or via a web interface. The system includes a nifty “vacation mode” that will set the temperature to a cool 60 degrees Fahrenheit while you are away. It will then automatically adjust the temperature to something more comfortable before you return home.

[William’s] home is split into three heat zones. Each zone has its own control panel including an LCD display and simple controls. The zones can be individually configured from either their own control panel or from the central panel. The panels include a DHT22 temperature and humidity sensor, an LCD display, a keypad, and support electronics. This project was clearly well thought out, and includes a host of other small features to make it easy to use.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, home hacks
Hack a Day 20 Dec 06:00

Online data analysis with Arduino and plotly

Introduction

It’s 2014 and the Internet-of-Things is flying along at a rapid rate with all sorts of services and devices that share data and allow control via the Internet. In the spirit of this we look a new service called plotly.

This is a “collaborative data analysis and graphing tool” which allows you to upload your own data to be analysed in many ways, and then graph the results using all sorts of plot types.

With plotly you can run your own mathematical functions over your data, run intense statistical analysis and use or edit one of the many APIs (PythonMATLABRJuliaRESTArduino, or Perl) to increase the level of customisation. Plotly works in conjunction with Google Drive to store your data, however this can be exported and imported without any issues. Futhermore plotly works best in Google Chrome.

For our review we’ll look at using plotly to quickly display and analyse data received from an Internet-connected Arduino – our EtherTen, or you can use almost any Arduino and Ethernet shield. The system isn’t completely documented however by revieiwng our example sketch and some experimenting with the interface plotly is very much usable, even in its current beta format.

Getting started with plotly

You will need to setup a plotly account, and this is simply accomplished from their main site. Some of you may be wondering what plotly costs – at the time of writing plotly is free for unlimited public use (that is – anyone can see your data with the right URL), but requires a subscription for extended private use. You can find the costs at the plans page.

Once you have a plotly account, visit your plotly home page, whose URL is https://plot.ly/~yourusername/# – then click “edit profile”. Another window will appear which amongst other things contains your plotly API key – make a note of this as you will need it and your username for the Arduino sketch.

Next, you’ll need some Arduino or compatible hardware to capture the data to log and analyse. An Arduino with an Ethernet or WiFi connection, and appropriate sensors for your application. We have our EtherTen that takes readings from a temperature/humidity sensor and a light level sensor:

Now you need a new Arduino library, which is available from the plotly API page. Lots of APIs there… Anyhow, click “Arduino” and you will arrive at the github page. Download the entire .zip file, and extract the plotly_ethernet folder into Arduino libraries folder which in most installations can be found at ..\Arduino-1.0.x\libraries. 

Finally we’ll use a demonstration sketch provided by plotly and modify this to our needs, which can be downloaded from github. We’ll go through this sketch and show you what to update – so have a quick look and then at out example sketch at the end of this section.

First, insert any code required to get data from your sensors and store the data in a variable – do this so the values can be used in void loop. Next, update the MAC address and the IP address of your Ethernet-enabled Arduino with the following lines:

byte mac[] = { 0xDE, 0xAD, 0xBE, 0xEF, 0xFE, 0xED };
byte my_ip[] = { 192,168,0,77 };

and change the MAC and IP if necessary. If Arduino and Ethernet is new to you, check out the tutorial. Now look for the following two lines and enter your plotly username and API key:

plotly.username = "yourplotlyusername";
plotly.api_key = "yourplotlyAPIkey";

Next – it’s a good idea to set your time zone, so the time in plots makes sense. Add the following two lines in void setup():

plotly.timestamp = true; 
plotly.timezone = "Australia/Melbourne";

You can find a list of time zones available for use with plotly here. Now you need to determine how many traces and points to use. A trace is one source of data, for example temperature. For now you will have one point, so set these parameters using the following lines:

int nTraces=x; // x = number of traces
int nPoints=1;

For example, we will plot temperature, humidity and light level – so this requires three traces. The next step is to set the filename for the plot, using the following line:

char filename[] = "simple_example";

This will be sent to plotly and your data will be saved under that name. At the point in your sketch where you want to send some data back to plotly, use:

plotly.open_stream(nPoints, nTraces, filename, layout);

… then the following for each trace:

plotly.post(millis(),data);

where data is the variable to send back to plotly. We use millis() as our example is logging data against time.

To put all that together, consider our example sketch with the hardware mentioned earlier:

// Code modified from example provied by plot.ly

#include <SPI.h>
#include <Ethernet.h>
#include "plotly_ethernet.h"
#include "DHT.h"

// DHT Sensor Setup
#define DHTPIN 2               // We have connected the DHT to Digital Pin 2
#define DHTTYPE DHT22          // This is the type of DHT Sensor (Change it to DHT11 if you're using that model)
DHT dht(DHTPIN, DHTTYPE);      // Initialize DHT object
plotly plotly;                 // initialize a plotly object, named plotly

//initialize plotly global variables
char layout[]="{}";
char filename[] = "Office Weather and Light"; // name of the plot that will be saved in your plotly account -- resaving to the same filename will simply extend the existing traces with new data

float h, t, ll;
int lightLevel;

// Ethernet Setup
byte mac[] = { 0xDE, 0xAD, 0xBE, 0xEF, 0xFE, 0xED }; // doesn't really matter
byte my_ip[] = { 192, 168, 1, 77 }; // google will tell you: "public ip address"

void startEthernet(){
  Serial.println("Initializing ethernet");
  if(Ethernet.begin(mac) == 0){
    Serial.println("Failed to configure Ethernet using DHCP");
    // no point in carrying on, so do nothing forevermore:
    // try to congifure using IP address instead of DHCP:
    Ethernet.begin(mac, my_ip);
  }
  Serial.println("Done initializing ethernet");
  delay(1000);
}

void setup() {
  // Open serial communications and wait for port to open:
  Serial.begin(9600);
  while (!Serial) {
    ; // wait for serial port to connect. Needed for Leonardo only
  }

  dht.begin(); // initialize dht sensor reading
  startEthernet();    // initialize ethernet

    // Initialize plotly settings
  plotly.VERBOSE = true; // turn to false to suppress printing over serial
  plotly.DRY_RUN = false; // turn to false when you want to connect to plotly's servers 
  plotly.username = "yourplotlyusername"; // your plotly username -- sign up at https://plot.ly/ssu or feel free to use this public account. password of the account is "password"
  plotly.api_key = "yourplotlyapikey"; // "public_arduino"'s api_key -- char api_key[10]
  plotly.timestamp = true; // tell plotly that you're stamping your data with a millisecond counter and that you want plotly to convert it into a date-formatted graph
  plotly.timezone = "Australia/Melbourne"; // full list of timezones is here:https://github.com/plotly/arduino-api/blob/master/Accepted%20Timezone%20Strings.txt
}

void loop() 
{
  // gather data to plot
  h = dht.readHumidity(); // read humitidy from DHT pin
  t = dht.readTemperature();
  lightLevel = analogRead(A5);
  ll = lightLevel / 100; // reduce the value from the light sensor

  // Open the Stream
  plotly.open_stream(1, 3, filename, layout); // plotlystream(number_of_points, number_of_traces, filename, layout)

  plotly.post(millis(),t); // post temperature to plotly (trace 1)
  delay(150);
  plotly.post(millis(),h); // post humidity to plotly (trace 2)
  delay(150);
  plotly.post(millis(),lightLevel); // post light sensor readout to plotly (trace 3)

  for(int i=0; i<300; i++)
  { // (once every five minutes)
    delay(1000);
  }
}

After wiring up the hardware and uploading the sketch, the data will be sent until the power is removed from the Arduino.

Monitoring sensor data

Now that your hardware is sending the data off to plotly, you can check it out in real time. Log into plotly and visit the data home page – https://plot.ly/plot – for example:

Your data file will be listed – so just click on the file name to be presented with a very basic graph. Over time you will see it develop as the data is received, however you may want to alter the display, headings, labels and so on. Generally you can click on trace labels, titles and so on to change them, the interface is pretty intuitive after a few moments. A quick screencast of this is shown in this video.

To view and analyse the raw data – and create all sorts of custom plots, graphs and other analysis – click the “view data in grid” icon which is the second from the left along the bar:

At which point your data will be displayed in a new tab:

From this point you can experiment to your heart’s content – just don’t forget to save your work. In a short amount of time your data can be presented visually and analysed with ease:

Conclusion

Although plotly is still in beta form, it works well and the developers are responsive to any questions – so there isn’t much more to say but give it a try yourself, doing so won’t cost you anything and you can see how useful plotly is for yourself. And if you enjoyed this article, or want to introduce someone else to the interesting world of Arduino – check out my book (now in a third printing!) “Arduino Workshop”.

Have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column, or join our forum – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

The post Online data analysis with Arduino and plotly appeared first on tronixstuff.

Tronixstuff 21 Jan 05:29
analysis  api  arduino  data  ethernet  internet  iot  of  online  plotly  things  tronixstuff  tutorial  

Arduino Tutorials – Chapter 16 – Ethernet

Learn how to connect your Arduino to the outside world via Ethernet

This is chapter sixteen of our huge Arduino tutorial seriesUpdated 06/12/2013

In this chapter we will introduce and examine the use of Ethernet networking with Arduino over local networks and the greater Internet. It will be assumed that you have a basic understanding of computer networking, such as the knowledge of how to connect computers to a hub/router with RJ45 cables, what an IP and MAC address is, and so on. Furthermore, here is a good quick rundown about Ethernet.

Getting Started

You will need an Arduino Uno or compatible board with an Ethernet shield that uses the W5100 Ethernet controller IC (pretty much all of them):

…or consider using a Freetronics EtherTen – as it has everything all on the one board, plus some extras:

Furthermore you will need to power the board via the external DC socket – the W5100 IC uses more current than the USB power can supply. A 9V 1A plug pack/wall wart will suffice. Finally it does get hot – so be careful not to touch the W5100 after extended use. In case you’re not sure – this is the W5100 IC:

Once you have your Ethernet-enabled Arduino, and have the external power connected – it’s a good idea to check it all works. Open the Arduino IDE and selectFile > Examples > Ethernet > Webserver. This loads a simple sketch which will display data gathered from the analogue inputs on a web browser. However don’t upload it yet, it needs a slight modification.

You need to specify the IP address of the Ethernet shield – which is done inside the sketch. This is simple, go to the line:

IPAddress ip(192,168,1, 177);

And alter it to match your own setup. For example, in my home the router’s IP address is 10.1.1.1, the printer is 10.1.1.50 and all PCs are below …50. So I will set my shield IP to 10.1.1.77 by altering the line to:

IPAddress ip(10,1,1,77);

You also have the opportunity to change your MAC address. Each piece of networking equipment has a unique serial number to identify itself over a network, and this is normall hard-programmed into the equipments’ firmware. However with Arduino we can define the MAC address ourselves.

If you are running more than one Ethernet shield on your network, ensure they have different MAC addresses by altering the hexadecimal values in the line:

byte mac[] = { 0xDE, 0xAD, 0xBE, 0xEF, 0xFE, 0xED };

However if you only have one shield just leave it be. There may be the very, very, statistically rare chance of having a MAC address the same as your existing hardware, so that would be another time to change it.

Once you have made your alterations, save and upload the sketch. Now open a web browser and navigate to the IP address you entered in the sketch, and you should be presented with something similar to the following:

 

What’s happening? The Arduino has been programmed to offer a simple web page with the values measured by the analogue inputs. You can refresh the browser to get updated values.

At this point – please note that the Ethernet shields use digital pins 10~13, so you can’t use those for anything else. Some Arduino Ethernet shields may also have a microSD card socket, which also uses another digital pin – so check with the documentation to find out which one.

Nevertheless, now that we can see the Ethernet shield is working we can move on to something more useful. Let’s dissect the previous example in a simple way, and see how we can distribute and display more interesting data over the network. For reference, all of the Ethernet-related functions are handled by the Ethernet Arduino library. If you examine the previous sketch we just used, the section that will be of interest is:

for (int analogChannel = 0; analogChannel < 6; analogChannel++) 
          {
            int sensorReading = analogRead(analogChannel);
            client.print("analog input ");
            client.print(analogChannel);
            client.print(" is ");
            client.print(sensorReading);
            client.println("<br />");       
          }
          client.println("</html>");

Hopefully this section of the sketch should be familiar – remember how we have used serial.print(); in the past when sending data to the serial monitor box? Well now we can do the same thing, but sending data from our Ethernet shield back to a web browser – on other words, a very basic type of web page.

However there is something you may or may not want to  learn in order to format the output in a readable format – HTML code. I am not a website developer (!) so will not delve into HTML too much.

However if you wish to serve up nicely formatted web pages with your Arduino and so on, here would be a good start. In the interests of simplicity, the following two functions will be the most useful:

client.print(" is ");

Client.print (); allows us to send text or data back to the web page. It works in the same way as serial.print(), so nothing new there. You can also specify the data type in the same way as with serial.print(). Naturally you can also use it to send data back as well. The other useful line is:
client.println("<br />");

which sends the HTML code back to the web browser telling it to start a new line. The part that actually causes the carriage return/new line is the <br /> which is an HTML code (or “tag”) for a new line. So if you are creating more elaborate web page displays, you can just insert other HTML tags in the client.print(); statement. If you want to learn more about HTML commands, here’s a good tutorial site. Finally – note that the sketch will only send the data when it has been requested, that is when it has received a request from the web browser.

Accessing your Arduino over the Internet

So far – so good. But what if you want to access your Arduino from outside the local network?

You will need a static IP address – that is, the IP address your internet service provider assigns to your connection needs to stay the same. If you don’t have a static IP, as long as you leave your modem/router permanently swiched on your IP shouldn’t change. However that isn’t an optimal solution.

If your ISP cannot offer you a static IP at all, you can still move forward with the project by using an organisation that offers a Dynamic DNS. These organisations offer you your own static IP host name (e.g. mojo.monkeynuts.com) instead of a number, keep track of your changing IP address and linking it to the new host name. From what I can gather, your modem needs to support (have an in-built client for…) these DDNS services. As an example, two companies are No-IP andDynDNS.com. Please note that I haven’t used those two, they are just offered as examples.

Now, to find your IP address… usually this can be found by logging into your router’s administration page – it is usually 192.168.0.1 but could be different. Check with your supplier or ISP if they supplied the hardware. For this example, if I enter 10.1.1.1 in a web browser, and after entering my modem administration password, the following screen is presented:

What you are looking for is your WAN IP address, as you can see in the image above. To keep the pranksters away, I have blacked out some of my address.

The next thing to do is turn on port-forwarding. This tells the router where to redirect incoming requests from the outside world. When the modem receives such a request, we want to send that request to the port number of our Ethernet shield. Using the:

EthernetServer server(125);

function in our sketch has set the port number to 125. Each modem’s configuration screen will look different, but as an example here is one:

So you can see from the line number one in the image above, the inbound port numbers have been set to 125, and the IP address of the Ethernet shield has been set to 10.1.1.77 – the same as in the sketch.

After saving the settings, we’re all set. The external address of my Ethernet shield will be the WAN:125, so to access the Arduino I will type my WAN address with :125 at the end into the browser of the remote web device, which will contact the lonely Ethernet hardware back home.

Furthermore, you may need to alter your modem’s firewall settings, to allow the port 125 to be “open” to incoming requests. Please check your modem documentation for more information on how to do this.

Now from basically any Internet connected device in the free world, I can enter my WAN and port number into the URL field and receive the results. For example, from a phone when it is connected to the Internet via LTE mobile data:

So at this stage you can now display data on a simple web page created by your Arduino and access it from anywhere with unrestricted Internet access. With your previous Arduino knowledge (well, this is chapter sixteen) you can now use data from sensors or other parts of a sketch and display it for retrieval.

Displaying sensor data on a web page

As an example of displaying sensor data on a web page, let’s use an inexpensive and popular temperature and humidity sensor – the DHT22. You will need to install the DHT22 Arduino library which can be found on this page. If this is your first time with the DHT22, experiment with the example sketch that’s included with the library so you understand how it works.

Connect the DHT22 with the data pin to Arduino D2, Vin to the 5V pin and GND to … GND:

Now for our sketch – to display the temperature and humidity on a web page. If you’re not up on HTML you can use online services such as this to generate the code, which you can then modify to use in the sketch.

In the example below, the temperature and humidity data from the DHT22 is served in a simple web page:

#include <SPI.h>
#include <Ethernet.h>

// for DHT22 sensor
#include "DHT.h"
#define DHTPIN 2
#define DHTTYPE DHT22

// Enter a MAC address and IP address for your controller below.
// The IP address will be dependent on your local network:
byte mac[] = {   0xDE, 0xAD, 0xBE, 0xEF, 0xFE, 0xED };
IPAddress ip(10,1,1,77);

// Initialize the Ethernet server library
// with the IP address and port you want to use 
// (port 80 is default for HTTP):
EthernetServer server(125);
DHT dht(DHTPIN, DHTTYPE);

void setup() 
{
  dht.begin();
 // Open serial communications and wait for port to open:
  Serial.begin(9600);
   while (!Serial) {
    ; // wait for serial port to connect. Needed for Leonardo only
  }
  // start the Ethernet connection and the server:
  Ethernet.begin(mac, ip);
  server.begin();
  Serial.print("server is at ");
  Serial.println(Ethernet.localIP());
}

void loop() 
{
  // listen for incoming clients
  EthernetClient client = server.available();
  if (client) {
    Serial.println("new client");
    // an http request ends with a blank line
    boolean currentLineIsBlank = true;
    while (client.connected()) {
      if (client.available()) {
        char c = client.read();
        Serial.write(c);
        // if you've gotten to the end of the line (received a newline
        // character) and the line is blank, the http request has ended,
        // so you can send a reply
        if (c == '\n' && currentLineIsBlank) 
        {
          // send a standard http response header
          client.println("HTTP/1.1 200 OK");
          client.println("Content-Type: text/html");
          client.println("Connection: close");  // the connection will be closed after completion of the response
	  client.println("Refresh: 30");  // refresh the page automatically every 30 sec
          client.println();
          client.println("<!DOCTYPE HTML>");
          client.println("<html>");

          // get data from DHT22 sensor
          float h = dht.readHumidity();
          float t = dht.readTemperature();
          Serial.println(t);
          Serial.println(h);

          // from here we can enter our own HTML code to create the web page
          client.print("<head><title>Office Weather</title></head><body><h1>Office Temperature</h1><p>Temperature - ");
          client.print(t);
          client.print(" degrees Celsius</p>");
          client.print("<p>Humidity - ");
          client.print(h);
          client.print(" percent</p>");
          client.print("<p><em>Page refreshes every 30 seconds.</em></p></body></html>");
          break;
        }
        if (c == '\n') {
          // you're starting a new line
          currentLineIsBlank = true;
        } 
        else if (c != '\r') {
          // you've gotten a character on the current line
          currentLineIsBlank = false;
        }
      }
    }
    // give the web browser time to receive the data
    delay(1);
    // close the connection:
    client.stop();
    Serial.println("client disonnected");
  }
}

It is a modification of the IDE’s webserver example sketch that we used previously – with a few modifications. First, the webpage will automatically refresh every 30 seconds – this parameter is set in the line:

client.println("Refresh: 30");  // refresh the page automatically every 30 sec

… and the custom HTML for our web page starts below the line:

// from here we can enter our own HTML code to create the web page

You can then simply insert the required HTML inside client.print() functions to create the layout you need.

Finally – here’s an example screen shot of the example sketch at work:

You now have the framework to create your own web pages that can display various data processed with your Arduino.

Remote control your Arduino from afar

We have a separate tutorial on this topic, that uses the teleduino system.

Conclusion

So there you have it, another useful way to have your Arduino interact with the outside world. Stay tuned for upcoming Arduino tutorials by subscribing to the blog, RSS feed (top-right), twitter or joining our Google Group. And if you enjoyed the tutorial, or want to introduce someone else to the interesting world of Arduino – check out my book (now in a third printing!) “Arduino Workshop” from No Starch Press.

The post Arduino Tutorials – Chapter 16 – Ethernet appeared first on tronixstuff.

Arduino Tutorials – Chapter 30 – twitter

Learn how to tweet from your Arduino.

This is chapter thirty of our huge Arduino tutorial seriesUpdated 16/06/2014

In this article you will learn how to send messages from an Ethernet-enabled Arduino to twitter. For the uninitiated who may be thinking “what is all this twitter nonsense about?”, twitter is a form of microblogging. 

You can create a message with a maximum length of 140 characters, and broadcast this on the twitter service. For people to receive your messages (or tweets) they also need to be a member of twitter and choose to subscribe to your tweets.

Generally people will use the twitter service using one of two methods: either using a web browser, or using the twitter application on a smartphone or tablet computer. For example, here is a typical web browser view:

… and here is an example of a twitter application running on an Android OS smartphone:

The neat thing about twitter on a mobile device is that if your username is mentioned in a tweet, you will be notified pretty well immediately as long as you have mobile data access. More on that later. In some areas, you can set twitter to send tweets from a certain user to your mobile phone via SMS – however if doing so be careful to confirm possible charges to your mobile phone account.

Finally, if you are worried about privacy with regards to your tweets, you can set your account to private and only allow certain people to follow your tweets.

So let’s get started.

First of all – you will need a twitter account. If you do not have one, you can sign up for one here. If you already have a twitter account, you can always open more for other uses – such as an Arduino.

For example, my twitter account is @tronixstuff, but my demonstration machine twitter account is @tronixstuff2. Then I have set my primary account to follow my machine’s twitter account.

Now log into twitter with using the account you will have for your Arduino and visit this page and get yourself a token by following the Step One link. The process will take you through authorising the “tweet library” page to login to your twitter account – this is ok. It will then present you with a long text called a “token”, for example:

Save your token somewhere safe, as you will need to insert it into your Arduino sketch. Finally, don’t give it to others as then they will be able to post onto twitter using your account. Next, follow step two from the same page – which involves download and installation of the required Arduino library.

Now for the hardware.

You will need an Arduino Uno or compatible board with an Ethernet shield that uses the W5100 Ethernet controller IC (pretty much all of them) – or consider using a Freetronics EtherTen – as it has everything all on the one board, plus some extras:

Furthermore you will need to power the board via the external DC socket – the W5100 IC uses more current than the USB power can supply. A 9V 1A plug pack/wall wart will suffice. Finally it does get hot – so be careful not to touch the W5100 after extended use. In case you’re not sure – this is the W5100 IC:

If you’re looking for an Arduino-twitter solution with WiFi, check out the Arduino Yún tutorials.

From this point it would be a good idea to check your hardware is working. To do so, please run the webserver example sketch as explained in chapter sixteen (Ethernet). While you do that, we’ll have a break…

Sending your first tweet

If you want your Arduino to send a simple tweet consider the following sketch. We have a simple function tweet() which simply sends a line of text (which has a maximum length of 140 characters). Don’t forget to update your IP address, MAC address and token:

// Simple twitter interface

#include <SPI.h>
#include <Ethernet.h>
#include <Twitter.h>

// Alter IP address to suit your own network!
byte mac[] = {   0xDE, 0xAD, 0xBE, 0xEF, 0xFE, 0xED }; // create MAC address for ethernet shield
byte ip[] = {   192, 168, 0, 99}; // choose your own IP for ethernet shield
Twitter twitter("aaaaaaa"); // replace aaaaaaa with your token

void setup()
{
  delay(5000);
  Ethernet.begin(mac, ip);
  Serial.begin(9600);
}

void tweet(char msg[])
{
  Serial.println("connecting ...");
  if (twitter.post(msg))
  {
    // Specify &Serial to output received response to Serial.
    // If no output is required, you can just omit the argument, e.g.
    // int status = twitter.wait();
    int status = twitter.wait(&Serial);
    if (status == 200)
    {
      Serial.println("OK.");
    } 
    else
    {
      Serial.print("failed : code ");
      Serial.println(status);
    }
  } 
  else
  {
    Serial.println("connection failed.");
  }
}

void loop()
{
  delay(1000);
  tweet("Purple monkey dishwasher");
  do{} while(1>0); // endless loop
}

You can check the status of the tweeting via the serial monitor. For example, if the tweet was successful you will see:

However if you try to send the same tweet more than once in a short period of time, or another error takes place – twitter will return an error message, for example:

And finally if it works, the tweet will appear:

Previously we mentioned that you can be alerted to a tweet by your mobile device. This can be done by putting your own twitter account name in the contents of the tweet.

For example – my normal twitter account is @tronixstuff. If I put the text “@tronixstuff” in the text tweeted by my Arduino’s twitter account – the twitter app on my smartphone will let me know I have been mentioned – as shown in the following video:

You may have noticed in the video that a text message arrived as well – that service is a function of my cellular carrier (Telstra) and may not be available to others. Nevertheless this is a neat way of getting important messages from your Arduino to a smart phone or other connected device.

Sending data in a tweet

So what if you have  a sensor or other device whose data you want to know about via twitter? You can send data generated from an Arduino sketch over twitter without too much effort.

In the following example we’ll send the value from analogue pin zero (A0) in the contents of a tweet. And by adding your twitter @username you will be notified by your other twitter-capable devices:

// Simple twitter interface

#include <SPI.h>
#include <Ethernet.h>
#include <Twitter.h>

// Alter IP address to suit your own network!
byte mac[] = {   0xDE, 0xAD, 0xBE, 0xEF, 0xFE, 0xED }; // create MAC address for ethernet shield
byte ip[] = {   192, 168, 0, 99}; // choose your own IP for ethernet shield
Twitter twitter("aaaaaaa"); // replace aaaaaaa with your token

int analogZero;
char tweetText[140];

void setup()
{
  delay(5000);
  Ethernet.begin(mac, ip);
  Serial.begin(9600);
}

void tweet(char msg[])
{
  Serial.println("connecting ...");
  if (twitter.post(msg))
  {
    // Specify &Serial to output received response to Serial.
    // If no output is required, you can just omit the argument, e.g.
    // int status = twitter.wait();
    int status = twitter.wait(&Serial);
    if (status == 200)
    {
      Serial.println("OK.");
    } 
    else
    {
      Serial.print("failed : code ");
      Serial.println(status);
    }
  } 
  else
  {
    Serial.println("connection failed.");
  }
}

void loop()
{
  // get some data from A0. 
  analogZero=analogRead(0);

  // assemble message to send. This inserts the value of "analogZero" into the variable "tweetText" at point %d
  sprintf(tweetText, "Pin analogue zero reads: %d. @username.", analogZero); // change @username to your twitter account name

  delay(1000);
  tweet(tweetText);
  do{ } 
  while(1>0); // endless loop
}

You may have noticed a sneaky sprintf function in void loop(). This is used to insert the integer analogZero into the character array tweetText that we send with the tweet() function. And the results of the example:

So you can use the previous sketch as a framework to create your own Arduino-powered data twittering machine. Send temperature alerts, tank water levels, messages from an alarm system, or just random tweets to your loved one.

Conclusion

So there you have it, another useful way to send information from your Arduino to the outside world. Stay tuned for upcoming Arduino tutorials by subscribing to the blog, RSS feed (top-right), twitter or joining our Google Group. Big thanks to @neocat for their work with the twitter  Arduino libraries.

And if you enjoyed the tutorial, or want to introduce someone else to the interesting world of Arduino – check out my book (now in a third printing!) “Arduino Workshop” from No Starch Press.

In the meanwhile have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column? And join our friendly Google Group – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

The post Arduino Tutorials – Chapter 30 – twitter appeared first on tronixstuff.

Tronixstuff 04 Dec 01:52