Posts with «intel» label

The End of Arduino 101: Intel Leaves Maker Market

This looks like the end of the road for Intel’s brief foray into the “maker market”. Reader [Chris] sent us in a tip that eventually leads to the discontinuation notice (PCN115582-00, PDF) for the Arduino 101 board. According to Intel forum post, Intel is looking for an alternative manufacturer. We’re not holding our breath.

We previously reported that Intel was discontinuing its Joule, Galileo, and Edison lines, leaving only the Arduino 101 with its Curie chip still standing. At the time, we speculated that the first wave of discontinuations were due to the chips being too fast, too power-hungry, and too expensive for hobbyists. Now that Intel is pulling the plug on the more manageable Arduino 101, the fat lady has sung: they’re giving up on hardware hackers entirely after just a two-year effort.

According to the notice, you’ve got until September 17 to stock up on Arduino 101s. Intel is freezing its Curie community, but will keep it online until 2020, and they’re not cancelling their GitHub account. Arduino software support, being free and open, will continue as long as someone’s willing to port to the platform.

Who will mourn the Arduino 101? Documentation was sub-par, but a tiny bit better than their other hacker efforts, and it wasn’t overpriced. We’re a little misty-eyed, but we’re not crying.  You?

[via Golem.de]


Filed under: Microcontrollers, news

Maker Pro News: Hardware is Still Hard, The Rise of Re-Kickstarting, and More

Maker pros showcase exactly how difficult it is to make hardware, but promote how much easier it is to become a Kickstarter star.

Read more on MAKE

The post Maker Pro News: Hardware is Still Hard, The Rise of Re-Kickstarting, and More appeared first on Make: DIY Projects and Ideas for Makers.

Intel releases an improved version of the Arduino 101 core!

A few weeks ago, an announcement was posted on the Arduino Forum mentioning new improvements on the software side of the Arduino/Genuino 101. With this release, the board–which was developed in collaboration with Intel–is reaching its full potential, with not only better code generation but unlocking useful features to make your sketches even more interactive as well.

You can easily upgrade the core using the Arduino IDE’s Board Manager (pictured below), while Arduino Create users will be automatically updated, so no action is required–the cool thing about the cloud!

In more detail:

  • The GCC compiler has been updated to support hardware extensions to the ARC EM core in the Intel® Curie™ module. This provides significant improvements in floating point operations, bit shifting, and other operations to enhance Sketch performance.
  • The Arduino/Genuino 101 platform offers 2MB Flash storage onboard, which is now enabled for user sketches.
  • An experimental driver has been implemented to enable the I2S interface via the CurieI2S library. Connecting the I2S bus to an external DAC (digital to analog converter) allows users to play high-quality music (HiFi).

Other improvements and bug fixes:

  • Motion Sensor: Several sample sketches, like MotionDetection, have been implemented to demonstrate the application of the IMU data
  • Bluetooth LE: Several new examples for BLE peripheral library added
  • IMU: Correct motion detection setting implemented
  • Library CurieTimerOne APIs are now compatible with the TimerOne library

For comprehensive release notes refer to the Intel Open Source Technology Center on GitHub.

Building a flamethrower guitar with Genuino 101

In support of the TBS show “America’s Greatest Makers,” YouTuber/plumber/stuntman/inventor Colin Furze recently took on the challenge of turning a bass guitar into a flamethrower with the help of a Genuino 101. Because after all, there’s nothing more metal than fire bursting as a rockstar shreds on-stage.

To bring this project life, Fruze added a pair of modified blow torches to the neck of the guitar and sawed off part of the instrument’s base to fit in the firing mechanisms. As you can see in his tutorial video below, the body is equipped with a gas reservoir on top, solenoid valves, a few switches, a gas supply to the blow torches, an inlet pipe, and some other components.

He even converted his amp to house a gas tank, along with a speaker, the Genuino board and a relay shield that enables the Maker to synchronize flames to certain musical patterns and sequences.

It goes without saying that you may not want to try this at home…

Don’t Take Photos of Your Arduino 101 Either, Its Light Sensitive

Wafer level chips are cheap and very tiny, but as [Kevin Darrah] shows, vulnerable to bright light without the protective plastic casings standard on other chip packages.

We covered a similar phenomenon when the Raspberry Pi 2 came out. A user was taking photos of his Pi to document a project. Whenever his camera flash went off, it would reset the board.

[Kevin] got a new Arduino 101 board into his lab. The board has a processor from Intel, an accelerometer, and Bluetooth Low Energy out of the box while staying within the same relative price bracket as the Atmel versions. He was admiring the board, when he noticed that one of the components glittered under the light. Curious, he pulled open the schematic for the board, and found that it was the chip that switched power between the barrel jack and the USB. Not only that, it was a wafer level package.

So, he got out his camera and a laser. Sure enough, both would cause the power to drop off for as long as the package was exposed to the strong light. The Raspberry Pi foundation later wrote about this phenomenon in more detail. They say it won’t affect normal use, but if you’re going to expose your device to high energy light, simply put it inside a case or cover the chip with tape, Sugru, or a non-conductive paint to shield it.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks
Hack a Day 06 May 00:01

Make or Break: who’s the best maker?

Last night Massimo Banzi was Guest Judge on Intel  America’s Greatest Maker - episode 4 and had the difficult task of evaluating the teams and their projects competing in the Make or Break rounds for $100,000 and a spot in the million dollar finale.

Check some bits of the episode in this Meet and Greet video and in the Fast Forward of the episode!

Arduino Blog 28 Apr 17:25

Massimo Banzi’s guest judge at America’s greatest makers

Massimo Banzi is among the judges on “America’s Greatest Makers” a reality competition from Mark Burnett (the reality-TV king behind “Survivor,” “The Apprentice,” and “The Voice”) in partnership with Intel which debuted last week on TBS.

In a first of its kind competition, the tv show takes 24 teams of makers from across US and puts them in head-to-head challenges to invent disruptive projects and win $1 million. The team are composed by unique people from 15 years old to 59 with ideas going to inspire a whole new audience of potential makers.

 

In the first two episodes, each team pitched their device idea to the judging panel composed by Intel CEO Brian Krzanich; business and financial expert Carol Roth; comedian, serial entrepreneur and co-host of truTV’s Hack My Life Kevin Pereira; and one of the celebrity guests.

At the end of April during 4th episode guest judge Massimo Banzi joins the panel as the remaining makers compete in the “Make or Break” rounds for $100,000 and a spot in the million dollar finale. If you are not in the USA, watch the episode at this link after April 27th.

In the meanwhile you can also watch a beginner maker project to learn how to do obstacle avoidance using Arduino 101. Cara Santa Maria is the trainer who’s going to guide you into the tutorial about this really important topic for projects involving moving objects like robots and drones:

 

Follow the show on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook and use hashtag #AmericasGreatestMakers

 

Arduino IDE 1.6.8: learn what’s new and download it

Today we are happy to release the Arduino IDE 1.6.8 and updated cores for almost all supported platforms (AVR 1.6.10, SAM 1.6.7, Curie 1.0.5).

This new version of Arduino Software adds support for scaling interface for UHD monitors: if the IDE is too small because your display resolution is very high or just because you want it bigger now you can set the scaling factor from the preferences panel:

Just uncheck the “Automatic” box, set the magnification to a suitable value and restart the IDE. Below you can see the “before” and “after” screenshot examples:

Another improvement is that the IDE now tries harder to remember the last window position when it’s closed and to restore it when it’s opened again. It’s a small improvement that should save some clicks every time the IDE is opened. (check Credits)

In collaboration with Intel we also released the new core, here are some of the updates:

  • we solved the upload problems encountered by some users on the 101 and we increased general upload speed.
  • the Arduino and Genuino 101 CurieIMU library is now reviewed, more usable and with many examples that show the features of the onboard sensor
  • we included new libraries for the Curie Core: CurieTimerOne: it’s now easier to play with Hardware Timers (for RTC functionality, instead, use CurieTime)
  • CurieEEPROM: use this library to simulate the non-volatile memory available on AVR cores.
  • CurieSoftwareSerial: the Curie version of the library allows you to create serial ports on (almost) any digital pin.

The complete changelog on the Intel core is available here.

We also included some frontend enhancement and improvements and, as usual, we made a lot of bug fixes, adjustments and fresh documentation thanks to the contribution of our community. The complete list of fixes and credits is available here.

Don’t forget to report any issue you find, either on Github or on the Arduino forum: your help is very much appreciated. It doesn’t matter if you are not a tech specialist: every feedback adds value.
Enjoy coding!

Arduino Blog 09 Mar 16:56

Arduino and Genuino 101 Available in the Arduino Stores

We’re very excited to announce that starting today Arduino 101* (USA only) and Genuino 101 (Outside USA) made in collaboration with Intel, are available for purchase exclusively on the Arduino Stores at the price of $30/€28,65 (+ tax).

Arduino 101 and Genuino 101 are the ideal successor of the Uno featuring a 32-bit Intel® Quark™ microcontroller for minimal power consumption, 384 kB of flash memory, 80 kB of SRAM (24 kB available for sketches), an integrated DSP sensor hub, Bluetooth Low Energy radio, and 6-axis combo sensor with accelerometer and gyroscope. You’ll be able to create projects with great features like recognising gestures and controlling your phone over Bluetooth connectivity — all without needing additional hardware.

We presented it and gave a preview during Maker Faire Rome 2015: watch Massimo Banzi and Josh Walden Senior Vice President of Intel Corporation introducing the board at the Faire in the video below.

We prepared some documentation so you can learn all the details about the new board:

And  3 tutorials focused on the new features of Arduino and Genuino 101:

Like all our boards, Arduino 101 & Genuino 101 are supported by Arduino IDE starting with version 1.6.7, that we have just released. Check out the download page. IDE version 1.6.7 contains a revamped, faster and more compliant version of Arduino-builder (all the fixes are reported here), a lot of fixes to Board Manager and the serial plotter is now able to plot multiple signals at once.

*Please note: Arduino 101 boards sold in USA are in pre-selling, we will be able to ship them  from December 28th onword.

Audio Effects on the Intel Edison

With the ability to run a full Linux operating system, the Intel Edison board has more than enough computing power for real-time digital audio processing. [Navin] used the Atom based module to build Effecter: a digital effects processor.

Effecter is written in C, and makes use of two libraries. The MRAA library from Intel provides an API for accessing the I/O ports on the Edison module. PortAudio is the library used for capturing and playing back audio samples.

To allow for audio input and output, a sound card is needed. A cheap USB sound card takes care of this, since the Edison does not have built-in hardware for audio. The Edison itself is mounted on the Edison Arduino Breakout Board, and combined with a Grove shield from Seeed. Using the Grove system, a button, potentiometer, and LCD were added for control.

The code is available on Github, and is pretty easy to follow. PortAudio calls the audioCallback function in effecter.cc when it needs samples to play. This function takes samples from the input buffer, runs them through an effect’s function, and spits the resulting samples into the output buffer. All of the effect code can be found in the ‘effects’ folder.

You can check out a demo Effecter applying effects to a keyboard after the break. If you want to build your own, an Instructable gives all the steps.


Filed under: digital audio hacks