Posts with «environment» label

A Peek at Hacking in an Energy Starved Future

In the future, we'll all live in "Live Cubes," tiny homes that restrict your energy and water use

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The post A Peek at Hacking in an Energy Starved Future appeared first on Make:.

A Peek at Hacking in an Energy Starved Future

In the future, we'll all live in "Live Cubes," tiny homes that restrict your energy and water use

Read more on MAKE

The post A Peek at Hacking in an Energy Starved Future appeared first on Make:.

Arduino Gives Your Toilet Options

With the severe drought going on in California with no end in sight, [TVMiller] decided he could put an Arduino and a toilet together to try and save at least a few gallons of water per day. The invention fills a toilet to the minimum level, saving around two gallons per day for the average “user”.

A typical toilet functions by using gravity and moving water to create a vacuum, sucking the waste down and out of the toilet. As long as there is nothing, uh, solid in the bowl, the toilet will be able to function on the reduced amount of water. The Arduino cuts the flow of water off before the toilet fills up the entire way.

In the event that anyone -ahem- needs the toilet’s full capacity, there is a button connected to the Arduino that fills the reservoir to capacity. [TVMiller] notes that if 1,825 hackers installed this device on their toilets, we could save a million gallons of water per year and be well on our way to saving the planet.

The project site is full of more information and puns for your viewing pleasure. We might suggest that the “2” button would be very easy to integrate with the toilet terror level indicator as well.

 


Filed under: home hacks
Hack a Day 09 Aug 09:00

Butlers, lunar rovers, snakes and airboats: the best of Carnegie Mellon's Robotics Institute

How was your week? We got to spend a couple of days trekking around the Carnegie Mellon campus in Pittsburgh, PA to check out some of the latest projects from the school's world renowned Robotics Institute -- a trip that culminated with the bi-annual induction ceremony from the CMU-sponsored Robot Hall of Fame. Given all the craziness of the past seven days, you might have missed some of the awesomeness, but fear not, we've got it all for you here in one handy place -- plus a couple of videos from the trip that we haven't shown you yet. Join us after the break to catch up.

Continue reading Butlers, lunar rovers, snakes and airboats: the best of Carnegie Mellon's Robotics Institute

Butlers, lunar rovers, snakes and airboats: the best of Carnegie Mellon's Robotics Institute originally appeared on Engadget on Sat, 27 Oct 2012 12:45:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Environmental Monitoring With Arduino goes to the Gowanus Canal

Emily Gertz and Patrick Di Justo, authors of Environmental Monitoring With Arduino (available from Maker Shed and O’Reilly), wrote it to let me know that the book got used as a textbook in the recent NYC Water Hackathon. They’ve got the pictures to prove it, too!

Brooklyn, NY, March 25 — Patrick and I went to the Gowanus Canal to observe the testing of prototype water monitoring devices created at the weekend Water Hackathon. The Gowanus is one of Brooklyn’s more notorious Superfund sites.

We were excited to see that the device being developed by Leif Percifield and the citizen sensor group Don’t Flush Me is based on the water conductivity gadget we devised for Environmental Monitoring With Arduino.

We designed our gadget to test water samples in a controlled setting, such as sitting at your desk with the samples in flasks. They’ve adapted our water probe with little spade terminals, to be more durable in the field. Brilliant!

Slideshow: “Environmental Monitoring With Arduino” goes to the Gowanus Canal!


MAKE » Arduino 29 Mar 23:30