Posts with «homemade» label

Tertiarm - low cost, 3d printed robot arm based on Ikea lamp

Primary image

What does it do?

Move things, push buttons, etc.

Cost to build

Embedded video

Finished project

Complete

Number

Time to build

Type

URL to more information

Weight

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Let's Make Robots 07 Feb 15:54

Tertiarm - low cost, 3d printed robot arm based on Ikea lamp

Primary image

What does it do?

Move things, push buttons, etc.

Cost to build

Embedded video

Finished project

Complete

Number

Time to build

Type

URL to more information

Weight

read more

Let's Make Robots 07 Feb 15:54

Tertiarm - low cost, 3d printed robot arm based on Ikea lamp

Primary image

What does it do?

Move things, push buttons, etc.

Cost to build

Embedded video

Finished project

Complete

Number

Time to build

Type

URL to more information

Weight

read more

Let's Make Robots 07 Feb 15:54

Guy creates handheld railgun with a 3D-printer

An ambitious maker has built a partly 3D-printed railgun that can fire aluminum or graphite projectiles at over 250 meters per second (560 mph). No, this isn't Quake, but it's no janky, all-plastic gun, either. The "handheld" weapon houses six capacitors that weigh 20 pounds and deliver over 1,800 joules of energy per shot. And it indeed works just like a full-sized railgun, using parallel electrodes to fire an "armature" bullet. The creator, David Wirth, added an Arduino Uno R3 to monitor charging levels, temperature and other factors, and tweaked the rails after he noticed "plasma damage."

Via: Kotaku

Source: Xtamared (Imgur)

Engadget 19 Oct 10:31

Guy creates handheld railgun with a 3D-printer

YouTube user "Xtamared" built a partly 3D-printed railgun that can fire aluminum or graphite projectiles at over 250 meters per second (560 mph). No, this isn't Quake, and it's no janky, all-plastic weapon, either. The "handheld" weapon houses six capacitors that weigh 20 pounds and deliver over 3,000 kilojoules of energy per shot. And it indeed works just like a full-sized railgun, using parallel electrodes to fire an "armature" bullet. The creator used an Arduino Uno R3 to monitor charging levels, temperature and other factors, and had to modify the rails after he noticed "plasma damage."

Via: Kotaku

Source: Xtamared (Imgur)

Engadget 19 Oct 10:31

Upcycle a Microwave into a Spot Welder

Long-time Maker Matthew Borgatti recently completed work on a homemade spot welder, built from a scrapped microwave and a few other parts.

Read more on MAKE

The post Upcycle a Microwave into a Spot Welder appeared first on Make: DIY Projects, How-Tos, Electronics, Crafts and Ideas for Makers.

Laser for PCB Prototyping?

I've had a great time working on circuit designs in Eagle the last week or so-- after my surgery, my sciatic pain is mostly gone and I'm able to concentrate again! Still, I'm mostly confined to the neighborhood and can't lift or bend or exert myself for another few weeks, so I'm happily plugging away at a few projects, the main one of which is my latest coffee grinder timer.

The timer PCB's odd shape was dictated by enclosure's design, resulting in a 100mm x 74mm board. It needed to be double-sided, but traces were made wide and vias were kept to a minimum in the interest of home prototyping. I've had great success with toner transfer in the past, but not for 2-sided boards, and not for anything large.

A PCB-production process I've wondered about is using a laser engraver to remove an etch-resistant layer on copper before normal etching. The best and most successful example I've found is on Instructables: "Custom PCB Prototyping using a Laser Cutter," where the author uses flat black Krylon indoor/outdoor paint as the resist.

The example (at right) shows a single-sided board, but I'm primarily interested in using the process for excellent top-bottom registration. Before attempting the large board, I will first try some small pieces with test shapes, then I'll try a double-sided ATmega32u4 breakout board (my own design), then Grinder Timer 5. Stay tuned...
Jeff's Arduino Blog 17 Dec 22:38
eagle  homemade  laser  pcb  

Homemade self-balancing unicycle uses an Arduino to keep upright

On the whim of a coin flip, Nick Thatcher once decided between building a homemade Segway, or a self balancing unicycle. Even though the powers of fate chose the former, Thatcher's thirst to build wasn't quenched -- he built the one-wheeled scooter anyway. The Raptor looks a lot like a Ryno unicycle built from spare parts -- a chain driven wheelbarrow wheel powered by a 350w geared motor, a pair of batteries wired in series, some PVC and polycarbonate, an IMU gyro and an Arduino UNO -- all hobbled together to form a one-wheeled electric mount. Thatcher says the scooter can push 10mph safely, but faster speeds tend to outpace the gyro's corrective efforts. Still, the bike promises between 90-120 minutes of face-plant free fun, provided the rider is at least a little balanced. The motorized unicycle isn't for sale, but peek on over to Thatch Industries for a parts list, or scoot on past the break to see the bike in action.

Filed under: Misc

Comments

Via: Hackaday

Source: Thatch Industries

Handmade/Homemade Board: "My Arduino III"

by Carlos Rodrigues on Flickr:

Construir o meu próprio Arduino, fase 3: alguns upgrades.

Tem agora melhor protecção contra ruídos na alimentação, reset automático ao iniciar um upload, protecção contra excesso de corrente no USB, e o bootloader do Arduino Uno.

[diagramas]
Translated by Google:
Build my own Arduino, phase 3: a few upgrades.

You now have better protection against noise on power, automatic reset to start an upload, protection against excess current in USB bootloader and Arduino Uno.

[diagrams]
I like it!
Jeff's Arduino Blog 14 Nov 01:19
arduino  homemade  

Meet the Arduino Due, the 32-bit board that'll let your projects fly (really)

As much as we love the Arduino Uno, it's not the most powerful of hobbyist microcontrollers. Fortunately, the folks in Turin have just put the finishing touches on a 32-bit upgrade with buckets of potential. At the heart of the Arduino Due is an 84MHz Atmel CPU, based on ARM's Cortex M3 Architecture, which is capable of being the brains inside your own flying drone or homemade 3D printer. It should start trickling out onto shelves from today, setting you back $49, but hey, that's a small price to pay to automate your drinking adventures.

Continue reading Meet the Arduino Due, the 32-bit board that'll let your projects fly (really)

Filed under: Misc

Meet the Arduino Due, the 32-bit board that'll let your projects fly (really) originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 22 Oct 2012 09:22:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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