Posts with «ble» label

A DIY interactive book that uses digital gestures

Digital and craft maker lab Tazas recently worked with a group of master students on an interactive book/prototype to reflect on how gestures like swiping have become as natural as shaking hands. Digital Gestures is a metaphor of the human body’s physiological senses, which identifies 10 actions inherent to our daily interactions with technology: drag and drop, spread and squeeze, swipe, double tap, scroll, zoom, rotate, draw, press, press and hold.

The project was brought to life using four basic electronic components and some digital fabrication: a web server (VPS), an AtHeart Blend Micro Bluetooth module linking objects to the elements contained on the server, an iPod Touch connected viewing medium and conductive ink. All the elements are arranged on a laser cut wooden base, while an iPod digitally decrypts the printed* pages filed on its left.

To play, the viewer places an illustrated page on the support and touches a specific key point beforehand determined as conductive. When touching, the viewer has the ability to interact on the screen in order to understand the illustrated use. This experimental reflection raises many questions about the conditioning that man receives from the machine by accepting these precepts without altering their function. What will become of our so-called ‘daily’ gestures? Will our close to real behavioral experiment be upset? Answers that require that ‘use must be done.’

You can see how it magically works below!

 

How to Develop a Sellable Bluetooth Low-Energy (BLE) Product

Bluetooth Low-Energy (BLE) is a great bluetooth solution for your electronics product even if energy use isn't a factor.

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The post How to Develop a Sellable Bluetooth Low-Energy (BLE) Product appeared first on Make: DIY Projects and Ideas for Makers.

Intel releases an improved version of the Arduino 101 core!

A few weeks ago, an announcement was posted on the Arduino Forum mentioning new improvements on the software side of the Arduino/Genuino 101. With this release, the board–which was developed in collaboration with Intel–is reaching its full potential, with not only better code generation but unlocking useful features to make your sketches even more interactive as well.

You can easily upgrade the core using the Arduino IDE’s Board Manager (pictured below), while Arduino Create users will be automatically updated, so no action is required–the cool thing about the cloud!

In more detail:

  • The GCC compiler has been updated to support hardware extensions to the ARC EM core in the Intel® Curie™ module. This provides significant improvements in floating point operations, bit shifting, and other operations to enhance Sketch performance.
  • The Arduino/Genuino 101 platform offers 2MB Flash storage onboard, which is now enabled for user sketches.
  • An experimental driver has been implemented to enable the I2S interface via the CurieI2S library. Connecting the I2S bus to an external DAC (digital to analog converter) allows users to play high-quality music (HiFi).

Other improvements and bug fixes:

  • Motion Sensor: Several sample sketches, like MotionDetection, have been implemented to demonstrate the application of the IMU data
  • Bluetooth LE: Several new examples for BLE peripheral library added
  • IMU: Correct motion detection setting implemented
  • Library CurieTimerOne APIs are now compatible with the TimerOne library

For comprehensive release notes refer to the Intel Open Source Technology Center on GitHub.

This Car Lets You Fistbump to Unlock

In the dark ages, you had to use a key to lock and unlock your car doors. Just about every car now has a remote control on the key that lets you unlock or lock with the push of a button. But many modern cars don’t even need that. They sense the key on your person and usually use a button to do the lock or unlock function. That button does nothing if the key isn’t nearby.

[Pierre Charlier] wanted that easy locking and unlocking, so he refitted his car with a Keyduino to allow entry with an NFC ring. What results is a very cool fistbump which convinces your car to unlock the door.

Keyduinio is [Pierre’s] NFC-enabled project, but you can also use a more conventional Arduino with an NFC and relay shield. The demo also works with a smartphone if you’re not one for wearing an NFC ring. Going this round, he even shows how to make it work with Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE).

In the video below, you can see how he removed the car’s internal lock switch and modified the wire harness to take the connection to the Arduino. He’s also included all the code. About the only tricky part is doing the actual wiring in your car and finding a suitable source of power. That varies from car to car, so it isn’t easy to give specific instructions.

Opening doors of one kind or another is a popular project theme. While [Pierre’s] project might open the door on a coupe, we’ve seen another project that works on a coop.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, car hacks, wireless hacks

First Look: Bean+ Microcontroller Adds Greater Range, Better Battery, and More

Today Punch Through Design launched a Kickstarter campaign for their new Bluetooth LE Arduino-compatible microcontroller board the Bean+.

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The post First Look: Bean+ Microcontroller Adds Greater Range, Better Battery, and More appeared first on Make: DIY Projects, How-Tos, Electronics, Crafts and Ideas for Makers.

Hands on with the Light Blue Bean

We took an initial look at Punch Through Design's Light Blue Bean when they opened for pre-orders. Now we have our hands on the hardware it's time to take a closer look.

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The power of BLE goes Arduino At Heart with Blend Micro for your IOT projects

 

This week we are delighted to announce a new Arduino At Heart Partner targeted for makers to develop low power Internet-Of-Things (IoT) projects quickly and easily: Blend Micro.

Blend Micro, by ReadBearLab is an integrated developement board “blend”ing Arduino with Bluetooth 4.0 Low Energy (aka BLE or Bluetooth Smart) into a single board.

In the following videos, you can see how easy it is to use Blend Micro with the companion Apps for both iOS and Android. See how to control digital output, PWM and Servo, obtain readings from digital or analog inputs.

On their website you can find some sample codes on how to write your own Apps too. They soon will provide a boot loader update which allow the Blend Micro to be programmed over-the-air from Bluetooth Smart Ready portable devices and PCs, no USB wire is required for uploading the sketch.

If you want Blend Micro now, it’s available in the Arduino Store.

 

3D-Printed Smart Watch Wins Our Arduino Challenge, Heading to Maker Faire Rome

Arduino-compatible brain, Bluetooth LE connectivity, 3D-printed case, and open-source design.

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MAKE » Arduino 02 May 22:21