Posts with «internet of things» label

To Understand the Internet of Things, Think Chocolate

We focused on the common sensors most people wanted and created one solid “chocolate bar” -- breakable, detachable, modular, wireless, cloud-enabled, with SDKs, tutorials, demo apps, etc.

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Program a Yún without writing code! Temboo’s Sketch Builder

Today’s guest blogger Vaughn Shinall from Temboo‘s team updates us with a new feature to ease your way into smart homes.

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Choose your sensor, choose what action you want it to trigger, and voila–your  Arduino Yún is doing it. Sending texts when a light sensor detects night, logging temperature data to a Google spreadsheet while you’re away, calling you when it sees an intruder in your home.

With our new Sketch Builder you can program your Yún to do all these things and more in no time. After choosing from multiple sensor types and actions, you can set the conditions and pins for your set up and have the code generated in an instant right on Temboo’s website. Then it’s just a simple copy-paste-upload job, and you’re on your way.

Go give the Sketch Builder a try today. Support for more sensor types and actions are on the way, so let us know what you’d like us to add.

Watch the Sketch Builder in action:

 

PS – You should also check out this cool Arduino Yún project where the user managed to get Temboo running straight from the board’s Linux distribution by installing the Temboo Python SDK on the Yún.

New Project: Notifying Doorbell with PushingBox

This project will help you to hack your doorbell to send Push notification and an email with an attached picture when somebody’s at the door. It use the free PushingBox service to delegate all the programming part and make things easy.

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The Yún Way: less time debugging and more time inventing

 

Today I’m happy to welcome Sven Kräuter as guest blogger on the Arduino Yún, as part of a series of posts exploring different unique features of our new board.

Sven works with Julia Kümmel focusing on agile & lean processes for soft- and hardware product development and together create projects at the intersection of the physical and the digital world, mostly using Arduino. His post below was orginally published at this link.

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This summer I had a speaker engagement at the Codemotion conference in Berlin which I really enjoyed for many reasons. For starters Jule & me participated in an inspiring wearable computing workshop where we met Zoe Romano for the first time. The next day I talked about a possible and easy way how to build the internet of things.

Presenting thoughts on & actions how to build the IOT.

After the talk it seemed to appear like a a good idea to Zoe that I should get a sneak peek at some new Arduino hardware. There weren’t any more details since it was still secret back then. Of course it didn’t took me much time for consideration since I really love Arduino for making our hardware prototyping so much easier. I happily agreed on checking out this new mysterious device.

The talk was about how to connect anything to the internet using an open source framework I initiated called the Rat Pack, so I assumed it had to do something with online connectivity or that something had to be connected to the internet. Turns out it was about both .

Making things talk with each other online (source: slideshare).

When Zoe told me about the Arduino Yún I was immediately stoked: an Arduino Board equipped with wi-fi, plus being able to access a small real time Linux system. How awesome is that? Exactly. I couldn’t wait to get hold of the Yún, and when it finally arrived it became quite obvious to me that I had a well thought and rounded product in my hands. Before I really knew what hit me this thing took shape on our balcony (see pic at the beginning of this post)

I’ll skip the amazing deeper tech details if you don’t mind (Uploading via wireless LAN, remote debugging, SSH access, Ruby on your Yún…). If you do mind please tell me, I’m glad to blog about them too . I’ll just give you a rough outline of the journey I went through with the Yun so far.

The first idea was to integrate it into the Rat Pack ecosystem. Adapting the Arduino client code of the rat pack was fairly easy, it simply uses Linux shell commands on the Yun instead of putting the HTTP command together in the Arduino C code. It’s just a small detail but dramatically reduces the complexity of your project. You don’t have to implement the HTTP calls yourself, you can rely on the work horse that Linux is.

Being inspired by this first success with the Yún I thought maybe I could reduce complexity of the prototype of a device that we use to welcome guests at our place. I’m talking about the Bursting Bubbles Foursqaure Switch.

Foursquare & Arduino powered soap bubble machine.

When you check in to our balcony with foursquare, a soap bubble machine starts filling the air with bursting bubbles. The first prototype uses Arduino connected to an XBee Wifly to control the soap bubble machine and a Rat Pack server that handles the Foursqaure API.

Initial approach with lots of moving parts(tm).

Quite complex and actually and as you might have guessed the Yún helped reducing both the software and the hardware complexity drastically. Adding it to the project made it possible to cut off a lot of fat. Actually it now only consists of the Yun connected to the soap bubble machine.

The Yun way.

What’s true for the hardware is also true for the software. Have a look at the code base. Reduced comlpexity is achieved by processing the response of the Foursquare API on Linino as opposed to letting the Ruby server take care of it. And although there’s much debate when it comes to JSON processing with regular expressions in general, I just used grep and a matching regexp to extract the information from Foursquare’s JSON response. The parts marked green are the only ones necessary after adding the Yun to the setup.

Losing some pounds. Or rather kilobytes…

For us at making things happen the Yún will also be the platform of choice for our Internet Of Things workshops. Until now we use Arduinos and XBee WiFlys since they turned out to be the most robust solution for introducing a group of people to the principles of connecting things to the internet.

Current ‘IOT Basics’ workshop setup.

Although this works most of the time there is still time needed to wire things up and debug the hardware the participants build. With the Yún we can reduce the time necessary for setting things up and debugging the custom setup and use it to concentrate on spreading our knowledge on the subject. Actually you only need two wires for the basic Rat Pack example when using the Yún:

Future workshop setup: drastically reduced wiring effort.

So on the bottom line I see the Arduino Yún as a major milestone in making the internet of things available to a broader audience and empowering fellow makers and tinkerers to spent less time debugging and more time inventing.

Less complexity = more time for creativity (source: twitter).

It will also make our workshops far less complex and let the participants concentrate less setting things up and focus on their creativity.

I did not use all of it’s features yet, I’m more than curious to explore more of it. The feature I’ll focus on next is the possibilities of actually using the pins of your Arduino via RESTful web service. I guess I’ll keep you posted about that. Thanks Arduino for this awesome device and thanks for letting me have a look at it a little earlier. It seems like the beginning of a wonderful friendship…

 

Arduino Announces New Wireless Linux Board

Today, Arduino announced a revolutionary new family of wireless products that combine the Arduino architecture with Linux.

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Designing the Electronics User Experience

In February I did an interview with Eric Jennings, co-founder of Pinoccio. Pinoccio is a new open source hardware business, building “a complete ecosystem for the Internet of Things.” The Pinoccio is a pocket-sized microcontroller board with wireless networking, rechargeable LiPo battery, sensors, and the ability to expand its capabilities through shields, much like an Arduino board. It features the new Atmel ATmega256RFR2, a single-chip AVR 8-bit processor with low power 2.4GHz transceiver for IEEE 802.15.4 communications. Eric Jennings, along with his partner Sally Carson, co-founded Pinoccio. In my interview with Eric he said: "Sally Carson, Pinoccio's other co-founder, is an expert in the intersection between humans and technology. What I mean by that is that she thinks very deeply and carefully about the psychology of humans interacting with computers. Human-computer interaction, user experience, and usability all fall under her umbrella. I consider her contribution a secret weapon in what we're trying to achieve with Pinoccio." A Secret Weapon?!... I had to find out more what Eric meant, and just what exactly is Pinoccio’s Secret Weapon. I contacted Sally Carson and asked her about the intersection of User Experience (UX) with electronics and the design of the Pinoccio. Along the way, I learned some good lessons on why design is important, even to just a set of electronics.

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Insert Coin: Arduino-compatible Pinoccio microcontroller sports battery, WiFi

In Insert Coin, we look at an exciting new tech project that requires funding before it can hit production. If you'd like to pitch a project, please send us a tip with "Insert Coin" as the subject line.

It's been said that imitation is the sincerest form of flattery. Improving on a good idea, however, is truly the ultimate homage, according to the makers of the new Pinoccio microcontroller. Inspired by the Arduino, the brain trust behind the Pinoccio decided to take the stuff they liked about the popular platform -- ease of programming and low cost -- and add some features to make it even better. These include a rechargeable battery, a temperature sensor and a built-in radio that allows one Pinoccio with a WiFi shield to communicate wirelessly with other Pinoccios. The microcontroller also delivers performance that stacks up well with an Arduino Mega but at a smaller size -- the Pinoccio only measures a couple of inches long and an inch wide. The project is currently trying to raise $60,000 at Indiegogo, with supporters netting the standard Pinoccio by pledging $49 and a microcontroller with a WiFi shield for $99. For more details, feel free to check out the video after the break or peruse the project's Indiegogo page by clicking at the source link.

Filed under: Misc

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Source: Indiegogo

Insert Coin: Arduino-compatible Pinoccio microcontroller sports battery, WiFi

In Insert Coin, we look at an exciting new tech project that requires funding before it can hit production. If you'd like to pitch a project, please send us a tip with "Insert Coin" as the subject line.

It's been said that imitation is the sincerest form of flattery. Improving on a good idea, however, is truly the ultimate homage, according to the makers of the new Pinoccio microcontroller. Inspired by the Arduino, the brain trust behind the Pinoccio decided to take the stuff they liked about the popular platform -- ease of programming and low cost -- and add some features to make it even better. These include a rechargeable battery, a temperature sensor and a built-in radio that allows one Pinoccio with a WiFi shield to communicate wirelessly with other Pinoccios. The microcontroller also delivers performance that stacks up well with an Arduino Mega but at a smaller size -- the Pinoccio only measures a couple of inches long and an inch wide. The project is currently trying to raise $60,000 at Indiegogo, with supporters netting the standard Pinoccio by pledging $49 and a microcontroller with a WiFi shield for $99. For more details, feel free to check out the video after the break or peruse the project's Indiegogo page by clicking at the source link.

Previous project update: The Lomography Smartphone Film Scanner was apparently ready for its closeup. The Kickstarter project more than tripled its $50,000 goal with two more weeks to go.

Filed under: Misc

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Source: Indiegogo

Arduino GSM/GPRS Shield gets helping hand from Telefonica for data, remote control

Arduino devices have had the option of a GSM linkup for awhile, but getting that cellular link to truly strut its stuff hasn't always been easy, even for those of us who'd be inclined to program an Arduino in the first place. Enter Telefonica, which wants to be the backbone of your internet of things. It's backing a new version of the GSM/GPRS Shield add-on (shown here) by offering both the expected machine-to-machine SIMs for the cellular connection as well as freshly added remote control of the board through the carrier's BlueVia pages. The Shield itself is getting a quiet upgrade in the process -- the software both takes up a smaller footprint and can now talk to the world in the background while the Arduino keeps on keepin' on. If you happen to be in Berlin, the new Shield is making the rounds at Campus Party workshops until April 25th. Neither side has said how readily available the new part will be available after that; for now, you can familiarize yourself with the current technology at the source link.

Continue reading Arduino GSM/GPRS Shield gets helping hand from Telefonica for data, remote control

Filed under: Peripherals, Wireless

Arduino GSM/GPRS Shield gets helping hand from Telefonica for data, remote control originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 24 Aug 2012 11:41:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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KegDroid: Combining Arduino, Android, and NFC to Dispense Beer

Happy to see the KegBot Project adding a new fancy Android shell as casing.

“If you are looking for an exciting hardware project, KegDroid deserves a look. It is a sophisticated system that involves Android, Arduino, NFC, plumbing and — beer. Perhaps the final stroke of genius is to package the whole thing in a Droid body. Some how the little green fella looks at home on the bar. You have heard of desktop and laptop apps now we have bartop apps to add to the list

via [SlashDot]