Posts with «battery» label

Quadrupede bluetooth Spider

 

After printing pieces to Prusa I3 is the new 4-legged spider with bluetooth comm :)

    

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Let's Make Robots 07 Jun 20:27
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Powering SG90 servos with lipo and BEC

Hi there,

I'm building a robot with 15+ SG90 micro servo's.

To power it, I've bought a 2C lipo battery, and a 5/6 volt BEC.

I've hooked up the BEC's 5v (red) to all the servo's red, and the BEC's ground to the servo's ground, as well as some arduino grounds (that control the servo).

The BEC has an on/off switch.  When the BEC is switched to off, and I plug the battery into the BEC, a surge of current flows through to the motors.  They all "twitch" very rapidly, and I've had some wires melt/smoke.

My questions are:

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What is the Matrix…Clock?

We’re surprised we haven’t seen this kind of clock before, or maybe we have, but forgot about it in the dark filing cabinets of our minds. The above picture of [danjhamer’s] Matrix Clock doesn’t quite do it justice, because this is a clock that doesn’t just tick away and idly update the minutes/hours.

Instead, a familiar Matrix-esque rain animation swoops in from above, exchanging old numbers for new. For the most part, the build is what you would expect: a 16×8 LED Matrix display driven by a TLC5920 LED driver, with an Arduino that uses a DS1307 RTC (real-time clock) with a coin cell battery to keep track of time when not powered through USB. [danjhamer] has also created a 3D-printed enclosure as well as added a piezo speaker to allow the clock to chime off customizable musical alarms.

You can find schematics and other details on his Hackaday.io project page, but first, swing down below the jump to see more of the clock’s simple but awesome animations.

 


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, clock hacks

Programmable Lithium Charger Shield for Arduino

Surely you need yet another way to charge your lithium batteries—perhaps you can sate your desperation with this programmable multi (or single) cell lithium charger shield for the Arduino<! Okay, so you’re not><em>hurting</em> for another method of juicing up your batteries. If you’re a regular around these parts of the interwebs, you’ll recall the <a href="http://hackaday.com/2014/09/21/a-li-ion-battery-charging-guide/">lithium charging guide</a> and that <a href="http://hackaday.com/2014/09/05/an-obsessively-thorough-battery-and-more-showdown/">rather incredible, near-encyclopedic rundown of both batteries and chargers</a>, which likely kept your charging needs under control.</p> <p>That said, this shield by Electro-Labs might be the perfect transition for the die-hard-’duino fanatic looking to migrate to tougher projects. The build features an LCD and four-button interface to fiddle with settings, and is based around an LT1510 constant current/constant voltage charger IC. You can find the schematic, bill of materials, code, and PCB design on the Electro-Labs webpage, as well as a brief rundown explaining how the circuit works. Still want to add on the design? Throw in <a href="http://hackaday.com/2014/07/16/finally-an-easy-to-make-holder-for-lithium-ion-batteries/">one of these Li-ion holders</a> for quick battery swapping action.</p> <p>[via <a href="http://embedded-lab.com/blog/?p=9644">Embedded Lab</a>]</p><br />Filed under: <a href="http://hackaday.com/category/arduino-hacks/">Arduino Hacks</a>, <a href="http://hackaday.com/category/microcontrollers/">Microcontrollers</a> <a><img src="http://feeds.wordpress.com/1.0/comments/hackadaycom.wordpress.com/138748/" /></a> <img src="http://pixel.wp.com/b.gif?host=hackaday.com&blog=4779443&post=138748&subd=hackadaycom&ref=&feed=1" />

Battery Shield Mounts Underneath The Arduino

So, what do you do when your Arduino project needs to operate in a remote area or as a portable device? There are LiPo battery shields available, and although they may work well, recharging requires access to a USB port. You can also go the 9v battery route plugged into the on-board regulator of the Arduino but the low mAh rating of a 9v won’t allow your project to stay running for very long. [AI] needed a quick-change battery option for his Arduino project and came up with what he is calling the AA Undershield.

As the name implies, AA sized batteries are used in the project, two of them actually. Yes, two AA batteries at 1.5v each would equal only 3 volts when connected in series. The Arduino needs 5v so [AI] decided to use a MAX756 DC-to-DC step-up regulator to maintain a steady stream of 5v. This article has some nice graphs showing the difference in performance between a 9v battery being stepped down to 5v verses two AA’s being bumped up to 5v.

The ‘under’ in Undershield comes from this shield being mounted underneath the Arduino, unlike every other shield on the planet. Doing so allows use of a standard 0.100″-spaced prototype PCB and is an easy DIY solution to that odd-sized space between the Arduino’s Digital 7 and 8 pins. The Arduino mounts to the Undershield via its normal mounting holes with the help of some aluminum stand offs.

[AI] did a great job documenting his build with schematics and lots of photos so that anyone that is interested in making one for themselves can do so with extreme ease.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks

Arduino servo

Hi

I tried to build a photovore using and arduino and tested it via usb cable,so far so good the system worked as intended as soon as i plug my battery via the dc connector the servo worked but extremly slow why?

Measuring battery capacity with an arduino

A yet another reason to have arduino in your basic-electronic toolkit. You can build your own battery capacity measuring device. Now compare all the brands of the so claimed ‘long lasting batteries’. Know what you are buying!

Follow the instructions to build from here. and get building!

Via: [Instructables]