Posts with «bluetooth» label

Netflix becomes your personal trainer with its new DIY device

Working out can be tough, but inversely, watching Netflix is super easy. The streaming giant doesn't want to distract you from your fitness goals, though. Netflix would much rather be your workout buddy, which is why it posted instructions for making a DIY personal trainer gadget.

Source: Netflix

Quad Walker

Primary image

What does it do?

Been working on a building a quad walker probably for a year now. What started of a coding project has now ended up with me learning how to 3d model and building a kit 3d printer.

The size of walker also grew, it started of using little 9g servos and now using full-size r/c car servos.

At moment, I’ve only modelled the leg at the moment, though I’m reasonable confident this will be the near final version before starting the body.

Will post more soon

Cost to build

Embedded video

Finished project

Number

Time to build

Type

legs

URL to more information

Weight

Quad Walker

Primary image

What does it do?

Been working on a building a quad walker probably for a year now. What started of a coding project has now ended up with me learning how to 3d model and building a kit 3d printer.

Along with scope of the project, the size of walker also grew. It was originally planned to use small 9g servers and probably end up 20cm across in total. Though I moved to using standard r/c card servos and as a result each leg will be around 20cm. No idea how big the body will need to be to house everything else.

Cost to build

Embedded video

Finished project

Number

Time to build

Type

legs

URL to more information

Weight

read more

Quad Walker

Primary image

What does it do?

Been working on a building a quad walker probably for a year now. What started of a coding project has now ended up with me learning how to 3d model and building a kit 3d printer.

Along with scope of the project, the size of walker also grew. It was originally planned to use small 9g servers and probably end up 20cm across in total. Though I moved to using standard r/c card servos and as a result each leg will be around 20cm. No idea how big the body will need to be to house everything else.

Cost to build

Embedded video

Finished project

Number

Time to build

Type

legs

URL to more information

Weight

read more

Quad Walker

Primary image

What does it do?

Been working on a building a quad walker probably for a year now. What started of a coding project has now ended up with me learning how to 3d model and building a kit 3d printer.

Along with scope of the project, the size of walker also grew. It was originally planned to use small 9g servers and probably end up 20cm across in total. Though I moved to using standard r/c card servos and as a result each leg will be around 20cm. No idea how big the body will need to be to house everything else.

Cost to build

Embedded video

Finished project

Number

Time to build

Type

legs

URL to more information

Weight

read more

Bluetooth Speaker With Neopixel Visual Display!

Finding a product that is everything you want isn’t always possible. Making your own that checks off all those boxes can be. [Peter Clough] took the latter route and built a small Bluetooth speaker with an LED visualization display that he calls Magic Box.

A beefy 20W, 4Ohm speaker was screwed to the lid of a wooden box converted to the purpose. [Clough] cut a clear plastic sheet to the dimensions of the box, notching it 2cm from the edge to glue what would become the sound reactive neopixel strip into place — made possible by an electret microphone amplifier. There ended up being plenty of room inside the speaker box to cram an Arduino Pro Mini 3.3V, the RN-52 Bluetooth receiver, and the rest of the components, with an aux cable running out the base of the speaker. As a neat touch, neodymium magnets hold the lid closed.

We gotta say, a custom speaker with LED visualization makes for a tidy little package — aside from the satisfaction that comes from building it yourself.

Depending on your particular situation, you may even opt to design a speaker that attaches to a magnet implanted in your head.

[via /r/DIY]


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, hardware, led hacks, musical hacks

Game Controller Cuts the Rug

There’s an iconic scene from the movie Big where [Tom Hanks] and [Robert Loggia] play an enormous piano by dancing around on the floor-mounted keys. That was the first thing we thought of when we saw [jegatheesan.soundarapandian’s] PC joystick rug. His drum playing (see the video below) wasn’t as melodious as [Hanks] and [Loggia] but then again they probably had a musical director.

At the heart of the project is, of course, an Arduino. An HC-05 provides a Bluetooth connection back to the PC. We thought perhaps an Arduino with USB input capability like the Leonardo might be in use, but instead, [jegatheesan] has a custom Visual Basic program on the PC that uses SendKeys to do the dirty work.

The switches are more interesting made with old CDs, foil, and sponges. The sponge holds the CDs apart until you step on them and the foil makes the CDs conductive. He uses a lot of Fevicol in the project–as far as we can tell, that’s just an Indian brand of PVA glue, so Elmer’s or any other white glue should do just as well.

The glue also handles the fabric parts. When a project says “no sewing” we realize how some people feel about soldering. The CD/foil/sponge switches might be useful in other contexts. We’d be interested in how the sponges wear with prolonged use.

We’ve seen other giant controllers before. Of course, if you really want a big controller, you can’t beat a Nissan (the link is dead, but the video will give ou the idea).


Filed under: Arduino Hacks

Upgrade your USB keyboard to Bluetooth with this Arduino device

If you have an old keyboard lying around and wish it were wireless, Maker DastardlyLabs has a solution.

The “HID Relay” is a small adapter that uses an Arduino Pro Mini, a Bluetooth module, a USB host shield, and a few other components to upgrade any USB keyboard to Bluetooth. DastardlyLabs has made three videos to explain the entire “Bluetooth-ification” process–which can be found below.

So far, the method has worked with all of the keyboards that DastardlyLabs has tested it on, as well as most mice (except for one “gamingish” USB mouse). The Arduino source code and build notes are available on GitHub. The HID Relay was inspired by a recent Arduino hack by Evan Kale. 

Hand Waving Unlocks Door

Who doesn’t like the user interface in the movie Minority Report where [Tom Cruise] manipulates a giant computer screen by just waving his hands in front of it? [AdhamN] wanted to unlock his door with hand gestures. While it isn’t as seamless as [Tom’s] Hollywood interface, it manages to do the job. You just have to hold on to your smartphone while you gesture.

The project uses an Arduino and a servo motor to move a bolt back and forth. The gesture part requires a 1sheeld board. This is a board that interfaces to a phone and allows you to use its capabilities (in this case, the accelerometer) from your Arduino program.

The rest should be obvious. The 1sheeld reads the accelerometer data and when it sees the right gesture, it operates the servo. It would be interesting to do this with a smart watch, which would perhaps look a little less obvious.

We covered the 1sheeld board awhile back. Of course, you could also use NFC or some other sensor technology to trigger the mechanism. You can find a video that describes the 1sheeld below.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks

Convert Any USB Keyboard to Bluetooth

[DastardlyLabs] saw a video about converting a PS/2 keyboard to Bluetooth and realized he didn’t have any PS/2 keyboards anymore. So he pulled the same trick with a USB keyboard. Along the way, he made three videos explaining how it all works.

The project uses a stock DuinoFun USB mini host shield with a modification to allow it to work on 5V. An Arduino mini pro provides the brains. A FT-232 USB to serial board is used to program the Arduino. A standard Bluetooth module has to have HID firmware installed. [Dastardly] makes a homemade daughterboard–er, shield–to connect it to the Arduino.

The result is a nice little sandwich with a USB plug, a Bluetooth antenna, and some pins for reprogramming if necessary. Resist the urge to solder the Bluetooth board in–since it talks on the same port as the Arduino uses for programming, you’ll have to remove it before uploading new code.

If you need help reprogramming the HC-05 Bluetooth module, we’ve covered that before. This project drew inspiration from [Evan’s] similar project for PS/2 keyboards.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks
Hack a Day 04 Sep 18:01