Posts with «h-bridge» label

My DIY BB-8: Problems, Solutions, Lessons Learned

Imagine trying to make a ball-shaped robot that rolls in any direction but with a head that stays on. When I saw the BB-8 droid doing just that in the first Star Wars: The Force Awakens trailer, it was an interesting engineering challenge that I couldn’t resist. All the details for how I made it would fill a book, so here are the highlights: the problems I ran into, how I solved them and what I learned.

The Design Criteria: Portable and Inexpensive

Carrying BB-8

I had two design criteria in mind. The first was to keep it low-cost. Some spend $1000 to $1500 on their BB-8s. I wanted to spend as little as I could, so as many parts as possible had to come from my existing stock and from online classifieds and thrift stores. Not counting the parts that were discarded along the way, the cost came in just shy of $300.

The second design criteria was to make it portable. It had to be something I could take on the bus or carry while walking a reasonable distance (I once carried it twenty-five minutes to a nearby school).

Both of these criteria meant that it had to be smaller than full size. A full size ball is 20″ in diameter. Mine has a 12″ ball which makes it 3/5 scale. Also, the larger it is, the more powerful and costly the motors, batteries, motor controllers, magnets, and so on.

Version One: Quick And Easy

First I tried a minimalist approach. For the ball, I found my 12″ cardboard globe on kijiji.ca. I bought an RC toy truck at a yard sale and attached a pole to it for holding magnets near the top of the globe. I then made a head with corresponding magnets under it. The head magnets attract to the pole magnets, keeping the head on. Meanwhile, the truck rolling inside the ball makes the ball move.

Making the ball roll around was easy. Making it roll around while keeping the head on was very hard. The magnets at the top of the pole attract the magnets under the head, pulling them down hard onto the surface of the globe. That essentially glues the truck to the top of the globe.

To overcome that the truck needs sufficient traction. That also means the truck needs to be heavy. And lastly, the truck’s motor needs to be powerful enough to overcome its own weight and the grip of the magnets on the ball. The alternative is to make the magnetic attraction weaker, but if it’s too weak the head falls off. It’s a tricky balancing act, in both senses of the word.

But the most dome-like head I could make stay on was just a cardboard skeleton. Anything more filled out would be heavier and require a stronger magnetic attraction. The toy truck’s motor would not be up to it.

Version Two: Drill Motors And Drill Batteries

Batteries and motors in Blender

For more powerful motors and more mass I figured I could kill two birds with one stone by going with drill motors and drill batteries in a hamster drive configuration. Using drill parts kept costs down as the batteries and one drill came from yard sales while the other drill was free through freecycle.org. Meanwhile, both are heavy.

To make sure it all fit, I drew up a 3D model in Blender, the free 3D modelling and animation software that I use a lot. In fact, finding out how to make the batteries and motors fit was the first step. They had to be as low as possible. Their large mass low down is what keeps the droid vertical, with the much lighter head at the highest point.

Batteries Velcroed and a connector

The drill batteries had to be easily removable for recharging. To hold them under the drive plate I simply used Velcro. Meanwhile, the drill battery stems went up through a hole in the drive plate. I made a connector to electrically connect to the battery terminals. It is a plastic rectangle with thin copper sheet metal for the contacts. Once the battery was Velcroed in place, this plastic and metal piece was lowered down onto the stem, the copper metal making contact with the battery terminals.

The Electronics

For the brains I used an Arduino UNO. To drive the motors I had all the parts for making two H-bridge driver boards, with the exception of 4 MOSFETs and some fuses. The Arduino does pulse width modulation (PWM) to the driver boards for speed control, as well as playing sounds at certain times when the motors are turned on.

For remote control, I hacked the RC receiver from the toy truck and added an extra set of AA batteries in parallel for more runtime. A problem I ran into right away though, was that the RC receiver put out voltages of both polarities based on which direction the motors should rotate, whereas the Arduino’s pins take only positive voltages. To solve that I came up with a converter board to go between them.

Getting all that to work reliably took a while. Before I added fuses, I burned a few MOSFETs. At one point I’d put an N-type MOSFET where a P-type should have gone and vice versa. That resulting problem alone took a few days of spare time to figure out.

The wheels were old Rollerblade wheels — I keep a small bucket of these in my shop. I decided I wanted the ball to roll at around 1 foot per second and doing the math, that meant the wheels would have to rotate at around 2 rotations per second or 120 RPM. I found a PWM value that would give something close to that and started blowing fuses. I started with 1 amp fuses, then 2, 5, and finally settled on 10 amp fuses.

My final hurdle was that the motors would behave oddly when the motors were told to turn in opposite directions but were fine when they were told to turn in the same direction. This turned out to be a bad assumption on my part about how the RC receiver was wired internally — none of the output wires were common inside. After some changes to the circuit, I now had stable electronics.

I had basically been treating the RC receiver as a black box, but when I asked for help about my converter board here on Hackaday, it was pointed out that the receiver likely contained H bridges. Opening it up, that’s exactly what I found. The converter board works fine for now, but in the near further I’ll use one of the suggestions from that Hackaday post to eliminate the board altogether. I might even try all of the suggestions, just for fun.

The Drive System

The drive system

The motors were too long to fit in line between the wheels and so had to be mounted off to the sides. To transfer rotation to the wheels, I drew up some gears in Blender and 3D printed them at our local University of Ottawa Makerspace. In the print settings I used 2 shells and only 50% infill. The gears are held firmly onto the shafts solely using nuts and washers on either side. They’ve held up amazingly well, even with slipping and grinding during development.

For the bearings for the center gears and the wheels I used an old trick of making bearing blocks from hardwood.

Putting Loctite and screwing gear to motor shaft

I wanted to keep as much room as possible on the drive plate available for adding things later and so initially I’d mounted the motors at only three points. But this allowed the motors to move a little causing the gears to slip. To fix that I later added a fourth mounting point and haven’t had any slipping since.

At the end of the shaft for the drill motors is a hole that a screw goes into. That’s part of how the chuck is kept on a drill motor, and that’s how one gear was kept on. However, this screw had a tendency to get loose. Putting a little Loctite on the threads fixed that.

Stability

Rearranging BB-8’s internals

Given that I was trying to fit a lot in a small droid, I had to mount some things higher than I’d have liked to. When the droid stops, mass high up causes the droid to wobble. In the BB-8 droid used for promotional events they’ve gone to a great extent to keep the majority of the mass as low as possible. Originally I had the Arduino batteries and the RC receiver with its extra batteries fairly high up. I later mounted them much lower. When holding the internals in my hands I could tell the difference but it didn’t make a noticeable difference with the wobble.

Instead, for that I added Adafruit’s BNO055 inertial measurement unit (IMU) board. With it I could tell what angle the droid was at when stopping and experimented with PID loops and other algorithms of my own to minimize wobble. That helped.

The Ball

As I said, I used a 12″ cardboard globe. To increase the traction of the wheels inside the globe I sprayed the globe’s interior with an anti-slip spray from a hardware store. This made a huge difference. However, over time the anti-slip coating vanished, and so I’m looking for another, more permanent coating, perhaps urethane or something. If anyone has any suggestions, please let me know in the comments. It also has to stop off-gassing eventually. The anti-slip spray had an odor for a long time.

Sealing globes – cardboard and fiberglass

But the main problem with the cardboard globe was its thinness. With the huge weight of the internals pushing down on it where the wheels are, it warped significantly and required a lot of effort and a copious amount of tape to keep the two hemispheres together. This large amount of tape also made an uneven ridge for the head to slide over, making it get stuck. At that point either the drive system continued to move while the head fell off or the drive system couldn’t move at all.

The solution was to carefully coat a new globe in three layers of fiberglass. I took my time doing this, over a month and a half, applying one piece at a time and then sanding before putting the next piece. The result was a fantastic improvement. It no longer deformed and now it takes a minimal effort to attach the two hemispheres with only eight narrow strips of transparent duct tape.

The Never-ending Saga

My DIY BB-8 in action

My BB-8 is now at the point that I can call it finished. At least it’s finished as far as all the engineering is concerned, and that’s usually where I call it quits.

While the paint job worked out well, up close you can see that the details are painted on. It’d be nice to have at least the lines on the head be actual grooves. Also, these drill motors are brushed motors and I’ve since learned that doing high frequency PWM to brushed motors damages them over time. I’d like to replace them with brushless motors. And as anyone who’s use cordless drills a lot knows, drill batteries don’t last long, and so it’d be great to switch to LiPos.

But for now, the reactions I get from both kids and adults is beyond my wildest expectations. Kids threat it like a friend while adults have petted it and called to it like it was a baby or a dog wagging its tail. I’d call that a success.


Filed under: Hackaday Columns, robots hacks

Ask Hackaday: How Do You Convert Negative Voltages to Positive?

I have a good background working with high voltage, which for me means over 10,000 volts, but I have many gaps when it comes to the lower voltage realm in which RC control boards and H-bridges live. When working on my first real robot, a BB-8 droid, I stumbled when designing a board to convert varying polarities from an RC receiver board into positive voltages only for an Arduino.

Today’s question is, how do you convert a negative voltage into a positive one?

In the end I came up with something that works, but I’m sure there’s a more elegant solution, and perhaps an obvious one to those more skilled in this low voltage realm. What follows is my journey to come up with this board. What I have works, but it still nibbles at my brain and I’d love to see the Hackaday community’s skill and experience applied to this simple yet perplexing design challenge.

The Problem

RC toy truck and circuit with no common

I have an RC receiver that I’ve taken from a toy truck. When it was in the truck, it controlled two DC motors: one for driving backwards and forwards, and the other for steering left and right. That means the motors are told to rotate either clockwise or counterclockwise as needed. To make a DC motor rotate in one direction you connect the two wires one way, and to make it rotate in the other direction you reverse the two wires, or you reverse the polarity. None of the output wires are common inside the RC receiver, something I discovered the hard way as you’ll see below.

I wasn’t using the RC receiver with the toy truck. I extracted it from the truck and was using it to control my BB-8 droid. My BB-8 droid has two motors configured as what in the BB-8 builders world is called a hamster drive, though is more widely known as a tank drive or differential drive (see the illustrations). Rotate both wheels in the same direction with respect to the droid and the droid moves in that direction. Reverse both wheels and it drives in the opposite direction. Make the wheels rotate in opposite directions and it turns on the spot.

The big picture – RC to drill motors

The motors in my BB-8 are drill motors and are controlled by two H-bridge boards. An Arduino does pulse width modulation to the H-bridge boards for speed control, and controls which direction the motors should turn. Finally, the RC receiver is what tells the Arduino what to do. But a converter board, the subject of this article, is needed between the RC receiver and the Arduino. Note that the Arduino is necessary also for countering when the BB-8 droid wobbles and for synchronizing sounds with the movement, but those aren’t addressed here.

Since there are two motors and two directions for each motor, the RC receiver needs to control four pins on the Arduino to make the two drill motors behave as follows: motor 1/clockwise, motor 1/counterclockwise, motor 2/clockwise, motor 2/counterclockwise. And whatever voltages the receiver puts on those pins has to be relative to the Ardunio’s ground.

And herein lies the problem. The Arduino expects positive voltages with respect to its ground on all those pins. So I needed a way to map the RC receiver’s two sets of motor control wires, which can have either positive or negative voltages across them, to the Arduino pins which only want positive voltages. And remember, none of those RC receiver wires are common inside the receiver.

My Fumbling First Approach

Now, keep in mind, electronics is a general interest of mine and except for what we were taught in high school physics class, I’m self-taught. That means I’ve “read ahead” but much of my knowledge has been determined by what projects I’ve done. So I have gaps in my knowledge. I’d never turned negative voltages into positive before. It sounded simple enough. Searching online didn’t help though. The closest I got was in two old posts in forums where the answers were “It’s easy to do. I can do it with a single resistor.” But there was no further explanation and I didn’t ask my own question anywhere at that point.

Using a transistor

Instead I came up with my own approach with just one set of wires from the RC receiver first. The wires coming from the receiver were blue and brown and could have either polarity depending on which way the receiver is being told to rotate the motor: clockwise or counterclockwise. That meant I needed two diodes to create two possible paths for the different polarities the brown wire could be: positive or negative. I then added a battery for the one path that was negative, to turn it into a positive.

Next, I put a PNP transistor between the positive of the battery and the receiver. With no signal from the RC transmitter, the transistor’s base is negative with respect to the emitter, but not enough to turn the transistor on. That’s because the battery’s negative is connected to the receiver’s blue wire and since there’s no signal from the transmitter, the brown wire is also at the same potential as the blue wire, and with battery negative.

The idea was that when the transmitter sent a signal to make that brown wire negative with respect to the blue wire, it would become even more negative and turn on the PNP transistor. A positive signal would then go from the battery, through the transistor to the Arduino.

The most obvious problem was that the Arduino wanted to see 3 volts to register as a HIGH input, meaning the battery would have to be at least 3 volts and so even with no signal from the transmitter, that would be -3 volts to the transistor, turning it on when it wasn’t supposed to be on.

Using A Relay Instead

Using a relay

And so I immediately thought of using a relay instead. I’d use the current running through the negative path to energize the relay, closing a switch that was completely independent of the RC receiver. The Arduino has a 5V output pin, so I made that switch close a circuit between the 5V pin and the Arduino’s pin 7, giving pin 7 the needed positive voltage.

The 1 in the circle in the schematic shows where I wanted to put a resistor in order to limit the current going through the relay’s coil. However, I tried with resistors all the way down to 4.7 ohms but the coil didn’t have enough current to close the switch. With no resistor, it worked and the current was 70mA. The relay’s coil was rated for 3V/120mA so I left it.

Using a relay did seem very heavy-handed, but it was the only solution I could come up with and I already had the relay in stock.

The next step was to add a second relay, doing the same for the second set of wires coming from the RC receiver for the second motor.

No Common In The Receiver

Schematic with common blue RC wires

But the behavior was seemingly sporadic. And keep in mind that there was a whole dual H-bridge circuit that was also connected to the Arduino’s ground. I’d worked with relays a lot before, and the RC receiver came from a commercially made and functional toy so I had no reason to suspect that. On the other hand, I’d made the H-bridge circuit from scratch since I already had most of the parts, and I was new to H-bridges and MOSFETs. So at first I spent a good two weeks of spare time thinking my problem was with the H-bridge and drill motor side. I’m sure we’ve all experienced the same blindness, thinking the most likely culprit is the part you had a hand in.

But at some point I disconnected the H-bridge and tested just the RC receiver circuit, watching the voltages at the Arduino pins while I remotely turned on both “motors” in both directions in all combinations (no motors were connected at the time though). The only odd behavior I saw was when I turned the motors on in opposite directions.

Notice in the schematic that I’d connected together both blue wires coming from the RC receiver. Up to that point I’d been assuming that the blue wires were common inside the receiver and that it was only the brown wires that switched from positive to negative with respect to the blue wires. From the behavior I was seeing it looked like both wires were switching polarity, possibly around some other internal common reference.

Finished RC-to-Arduino converter schematic

So I added a third relay on one of the positive paths of one of the sets of wires. That meant the corresponding blue wire no longer needed to be grounded, keeping both of the receiver’s blue wires separate. Note that I didn’t bother putting in a fourth relay for the remaining positive path, and it turned out to not be necessary. At that point the circuits worked great and continue to do so.

The Ask

And so I ask, is there a better way to convert the RC receiver output to something the Arduino can use? Relays require power, so it would be nice if there was a solution that didn’t require any extra power. My relay solution seems very early 1900s. Or maybe it’s a good solution after all, but just one of many. Let us know in the comments below.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, Ask Hackaday

Control DC motors with a Grove H-Bridge and DynamixShield

I just uploaded a new video tutorial on how to use the Grove dual H-Bridge module with the DynamixShield and an Arduino Due to control DC motors. 


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Hardware Store CNC Machine is Remarkably Precise

A vise, a hacksaw and file, some wrenches – the fanciest tools [HomoFaciens] uses while building his DIY hardware store CNC machine (YouTube link) are a drill press and some taps. And the bill of materials for this surprisingly precise build is similarly modest: the X- and Y-axes ride on cheap bearings that roll on steel tube stock and aluminum angles; drives are threaded rods with homemade encoders and powered by small brushed DC gear motors; and the base plate appears to be a scrap of ping-pong table. The whole thing is controlled by an Arduino and four H-bridges.

The first accuracy tests using a ball point pen for tooling are quite impressive. [HomoFaciens] was able to draw concentric circles eyeball-accurate to within a few tenths of a millimeter, and was able to show good repeatability in returning to a point from both directions on both the X- and Y-axis. After the pen tests, he shows off a couple of other hardware store tooling options for the Z-axis – a Proxxon rotary tool with a burr for engraving glass; a soldering iron for cutting styrofoam; and a mini-router that works well enough to cut some acrylic gears.

We’re impressed by this build, which demonstrates that you don’t need a fancy shop to build a CNC machine. If you’re getting the itch to jump into the shallow end of the CNC pool, check out some of the builds we’ve featured before, like this PVC CNC machine, or this $250 build.

[Thanks, ThunderSqueak]


Filed under: cnc hacks

H-Bridge only drives motor one direction:What am I missing?

(Perhaps I should preface this with the notation that NOTHING is working right today and I may just have gremlins.  That said...)

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bi-directional speed controller

Hi all.

I am really new to robotics, and only just recently got my arduino uno. i've played around a bit here and there to learn how to control servo's and such, so i figured it's time for me to build my first robot. but in the design, i've come across a few problems:

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GOduino II = Arduino + L293D Variable Speed Motor Controller

NTRODUCTION

The GOduino II is a self-contained

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Let's Make Robots 06 Apr 15:00

Underwater ROV again this year

Last year I blogged about MATE ‘s Monterey Bay Regional underwater ROV competition in Underwater ROV contest.  I coached a robotics club at my son’s high school, and they built a small vehicle which they barely got into the water the day before the contest, because we started so late.

Although my son is being home-schooled this year, we have kept the team going, losing one member and picking up another (so we still have only 3).  The robotics club is no longer affiliated with a school, but that makes no difference, as all the school provided us was an inconvenient time to meet (lunch on Tuesdays) and 15 minutes in the pool once.  We meet for 3 hours on Sundays at my house, which gives them enough time to get something done.

I’m still paying the expenses out of my own pocket, and we now have the construction of the vehicle taking up about a third of our living room (the benchtop drill press is the first thing you see on entering the house, unless it is on the floor to make room on the robotics table for the scroll saw).

The students have made considerable progress since last year, having replaced the high-resistance tether and switch box with a low-resistance power wire and a dry box that will house an Arduino microprocessor with H-bridge chips.  They’ve made the tether with a waterproof disconnect and have tested everything for water tightness (though only at bathtub depth, not 10 feet deep).  I think that they’ll have the basic vehicle and electronics finished by the end of January, leaving some time for designing and building mission-specific tools, programming the Arduino and the laptop GUI, and learning to pilot the vehicle.  Now we just have to find a pool to practice in.

The club members have gotten much more independent this year, so my coaching involves my making some suggestions about what they should work on at the beginning of the meeting, checking to see how they are doing about once an hour, and having a discussion with them about what they’ll need to design or build next over snacks near the end of the meeting.  I also try to get them to give me specific parts to buy, but I usually end up having to find and select parts for them.  If the group were bigger (and my wallet more able to tolerate mistakes), I could have the students doing more of the purchasing.

The challenges for this year have been published, and they are in the usual verbose style.  I may have a hard time getting all the students to read the specs carefully, since the specs go on and on with irrelevant “color” hiding the nuggets of critical information.  I’m not looking forward to making the items needed for practicing the missions this year, since they are described in the same wordy way as last year (which I found difficult to follow in several places), and they haven’t even released photos or drawings of what the objects are supposed to look like.  Trying to re-create the objects from the turgid assembly directions without pictures is going to be a nightmare.

The contest does not have any tasks this year that need a depth gauge (but I bought a pressure sensor, so the students will measure depth!), but they will need to determine compass headings, so we’re trying to decide whether to get a cheap compass and put it in the camera view, or add an electronic compass module to the electronics in the dry box.  An electronic compass is definitely cooler, but we may be running out of pins on the Arduino.

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Tagged: Arduino, contests, electronic compass, H-bridge, remotely operated underwater vehicle, robotics, ROV

New board designed

I’ve just sent a new set of boards for fab.  The HexMotor rev2.3 boards have several new features: LEDs for +5v and +6.25v, a reset button, 16-bit shift register instead of 8-bit, servo outputs connected to pins 13, 7, 2, 9, 10 (rather than to the pins used for PWM).  The new board should be able to do either 6 PWM motors or 4 PWM motors, 5 servos, and 2 non-modulated reversible motors.

I’m also making some breakout boards for the MPXHZ6250A pressure sensors from Freescale Semiconductor, which will require doing some SMD soldering.  At least the design uses gull-wing pins, which can (supposedly) be hand soldered.  One of the breakout boards also has a place for mounting an ADXL335 accelerometer, which may be more difficult to solder.  I don’t think I want to spend the money for a hot-air rework station, and I’m a bit dubious about my ability to solder using a toaster oven.

The pressure sensors are tiny!  My original suggestion to the robotics club was to drill a hole in the dry box and superglue the pressure sensor to the inside of the box (after the pressure sensor had been attached to the breakout board, of course).  Now I’m not so sure that there will be enough glue area to hold firmly enough.  Perhaps a dab of some sealant on the outside of the box might help, if we can keep from plugging the hole in the sensor.

The breakout board that I think that the robotics club will end up using puts a pressure sensor on one side and headers for a piggyback ADXL335 breakout board on the back.  that way there only need to be one set of wires for connecting the analog inputs and power to the sensors.

One limitation of the Arduino for use with this combination of sensors is that the accelerometer is a 3v part and the pressure sensor is a 5v part. We’ll have to set up the analog-to-digital converter on the Arduino to have a 5v range, which reduces the precision of the acceleration readings.

I’ve also bought some other sensors (not for the underwater vehicle, but for physics class and dry robotics): a couple of ultrasonic rangefinders.  More on those in a separate post, after I’ve had a chance to play with them.


Tagged: accelerometer, Arduino, H-bridge, motor controller, pressure sensor, Printed circuit board

Board fully populated and tested

Top view of the HexMotor rev 1.3 board fully populated.

I got the board fully populated yesterday, plus I made a heat sink out of a piece of ¼” × ¾” aluminum bar stock.  The heat sink makes an enormous difference.  Before using it, running a small motor at low power for 20–30 seconds was enough to make the H-bridge uncomfortably hot.  Now running the same 12v motor stalled at full current (3A) for a full minute raises the temperature only to 100ºF.

The motor got warmer than that, and I think I burned it out, since it no longer runs and has a 400kΩ resistance.  I’m not really surprised—it was a cheap door-lock actuator, and only intended to be used with fraction of a second pulses.  Further testing will require a more robust motor.

As you can see from the photo, the screw terminal for motor 4 (second from the bottom) is a bit crooked—I’ll have to unsolder it and straighten it.  For the HexMotor 2 board, I’ll use slightly smaller holes so alignment is easier.

The thermal grease I used (Cooler Master IceFusion High Performance Thermal Compound 40G RG-ICF-CWR2-GP) was more liquid than I expected, especially since it comes with a little spatula for applying it.  I had to put on a fairly thick layer, because the aluminum extrusion was not very smooth, and when I tightened the bolts the stuff oozed out making a sticky mess. Next time, I’ll sand the aluminum smooth first and use much less thermal grease.

Closeup, showing the excess thermal grease puddling under the H-bridges, where it is very difficult to wipe off.

This closeup photo, in addition to showing the pooled excess thermal grease, shows the header pins with shorting jumpers to configure the H-bridges for either lock antiphase or sign-magnitude control.  (Because of the last-minute change from TLE-5205 to TLE-5206 chips, the silk-screen labeling of the header pins is wrong—this board is actually configured for sign-magnitude throughout not lock antiphase.

The photos also show that I did not leave room for the heat sink between the electrolytic capacitors.  The HexMotor 2.0 board will fix this problem also.

The HexMotor software now can handle 3 different boards: the HexMotor rev 1.3 board shown here, the Adafruit Motor Shield, and the HexMotor rev 2 board, which I am just about done fussing with the design for.  I’ve only tested with an Arduino Duemilanove board, but the software should work with an Arduino Mega as well.


Tagged: Arduino, H-bridge, heat sink, motor controller, Printed circuit board, thermal grease