Posts with «raspberry pi» label

Arduino and Pi Breathe New Life into Jukebox

What do you do when someone gives you a Wurlitzer 3100 jukebox from 1969, but keeps all the records? If you are like [Tijuana Rick], you grab an Arduino and a Rasberry Pi and turn it into a really awesome digital music player.

We’ll grant you, making a music player out of a Raspberry Pi isn’t all that cutting edge, but restoration and integration work is really impressive. The machine had many broken switches that had been hastily repaired, so [Rick] had to learn to create silicone molds and cast resin to create replacements. You can see and hear the end result in the video below.

[Rick] was frustrated with jukebox software he could find, until he found some Python code from [Thomas Sprinkmeier]. [Rick] used that code as a base and customized it for his needs.

There’s not much “how to” detail about the castings for the switches, but there are lots of photos and the results were great. We wondered if he considered putting fake 45s in the machine so it at least looked like it was playing vinyl.

Of course, you don’t need an old piece of hardware to make a jukebox. Or, you can compromise and build out a replica.

 

 


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, Raspberry Pi

Maker Spotlight: Daniel Zimmerman

An engineering manager, Daniel Zimmerman enjoys tinkering on basement tech projects that further automate his home.

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The post Maker Spotlight: Daniel Zimmerman appeared first on Make: DIY Projects and Ideas for Makers.

Latskap Semi-Automatic Liquor Cabinet

A well-stocked liquor cabinet is a necessity for the classy gentleman or gentlelady who likes to entertain. Having the proper spirits and mixers on hand to make anything from a martini to a sidecar is always a solid way to ensure guests have a good time at your cocktail party. In the past, a beautifully crafted cherry or walnut liquor cabinet was enough to impress visitors with your affluence. These days, if you don’t want to look like a pauper, you have to take it a step further.

[Elias Bakken] and his uncle [Mike Moulton] have decided to take liquor cabinets into the 21st century with a semi-automatic liquor cabinet called Latskap. The project is still in progress, and in the prototyping stage, but their build log on Hackaday.io is showing a lot of potential. It shouldn’t be long before they have a fully functional prototype finished.

Latskap has a few primary functions: the first is that it automatically opens when someone approaches it. Then the thirsty guest can use the touchscreen to choose the drink they’d like from the menu. The bottles inside the cabinet are resting on NeoPixels, and the system lights up the liquor and mixer bottles needed for that drink. Finally, a scale at the front of the cabinet weighs the glass as ingredients are poured, and tells the parched patron when they’ve poured the correct amount for their drink.

We’ve seen liquor dispensers in the past that are designed to mix a cocktail all on their own, but the Latskap takes an interesting new approach. The main benefit of this design is that the number of bottles is limited only by how much room is available. There are no complex pumping systems necessary. We’re definitely looking forward to seeing the finished product!


Filed under: Beer Hacks
Hack a Day 18 Aug 16:30

Visual Development with XOD

Early programmers had to represent code using binary, octal, or hex numbers. This gave way quickly to representing programs as text to be assembled, compiled, or interpreted by the computer. Even today, this remains the most common way to program, but there have been attempts to develop more visual ways to create programs graphically. If you program microcontrollers like the Arduino, you should check out XOD and see how you like visually creating software. The software is open source and currently, can target the Arduino or Raspberry Pi.

You can launch the IDE in a web browser or download a local copy. You transfer nodes from a palette into a grid-like workspace. These nodes might be inputs, outputs, processing blocks, or represent real-world I/O devices. Nodes have inputs and outputs of specific types and you connect them together, connecting like types only, although there are blocks that can convert.

For example, to the right is a simple set of nodes that forms the prototypical flashing LED program. A clock node creates a pulse that toggles a memory element and a digital output accepts both the signal and a constant value indicating which port it represents.

This is a simple example, but it does show the intuitive flow of joining nodes. There is a reasonable array of node types and sufficient documentation.

There are out-of-the-box nodes for ultrasonic sensors, temperature sensors, servos, LCDs, buttons, and H-bridges. You can create your own super-nodes (patches) and you also can make multiple disjointed flows to execute more than one task at a time.

When you generate the code you get a lot of boilerplate that sets up the run time system and the nodes you use. Your main code appears to be in an evaluate function. For example, here’s a snippet of the code that corresponds to the simple graphical blink program:

void evaluate(Context ctx) {
State* state = getState(ctx);
TimeMs tNow = transactionTime();
TimeMs dt = getValue<input_IVAL>(ctx) * 1000;
TimeMs tNext = tNow + dt;

if (isInputDirty<input_RST>(ctx)) {
if (dt == 0) {
state->nextTrig = 0;
clearTimeout(ctx);
} else if (state->nextTrig < tNow || state->nextTrig > tNext) {
state->nextTrig = tNext;
setTimeout(ctx, dt);
}
} else {
// It was a scheduled tick
emitValue<output_TICK>(ctx, 1);
state->nextTrig = tNext;
setTimeout(ctx, dt);
}
}

There are a few rough edges, which isn’t surprising for new software. For one thing, nodes have fixed numbers of inputs and outputs. So if you want, for example, a ten-input AND gate, you’ll have to build it. Another apparent issue is there is no way we found to select a lot of items at once. If you decide you want to move a whole bunch of nodes down to make room for something new, you are going to be in for a lot of work.

There are other drag-and-drop programming languages, of course. We’ve covered Scratch for the Arduino and the Raspberry Pi, before. However, this is a dead simple way to try flow-based programming with minimal setup.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, Raspberry Pi

Maker Pro News: Hardware is Still Hard, The Rise of Re-Kickstarting, and More

Maker pros showcase exactly how difficult it is to make hardware, but promote how much easier it is to become a Kickstarter star.

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The post Maker Pro News: Hardware is Still Hard, The Rise of Re-Kickstarting, and More appeared first on Make: DIY Projects and Ideas for Makers.

From the New Issue of Make: Our 8 Standout Dev Boards

These eight boards stand out for their advanced specs, built-in offerings, and, in some cases, their innovative interface options.

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The post From the New Issue of Make: Our 8 Standout Dev Boards appeared first on Make: DIY Projects and Ideas for Makers.

This Week in Making: ChickTech Meetup, Dark Souls Props, and Robotic Arms

This Week in Making saw the reveal of the Two Bit Circus Foundation, hand-made Dark Souls rings, some new crowd funding campaigns, and more.

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The post This Week in Making: ChickTech Meetup, Dark Souls Props, and Robotic Arms appeared first on Make: DIY Projects and Ideas for Makers.

WinchBot is a robotic arm composed of 3 winches and 5 servos

Using an Arduino Uno along with a Raspberry Pi for control, hacker “HomoFaciens” came up with this clever delta-style robot.

If you were going to make a robot with five servos, many Makers would make a robot arm with them and call it a day. HomoFaciens, however, who is known for making amazing machines with minimal tools and improvised materials, instead made something that seems to be a cross between a delta robot and a Skycam.

His device, called “WinchBot,” uses three winches attached to an equilateral triangle frame to move a slider on a central pivoting square rod. This allows the robot’s 5-axis “hand” to be positioned within the robot’s work area. The servos are then tasked with keeping everything in the correct orientation, as well as opening and closing the gripper as needed.

If you’d like more details than given in the very entertaining video seen here, be sure to check out the project’s write-up.

Interactive Game Board Helps Toddler Learn Colors and Shapes

Most parents would do anything to enrich their kids’ worlds and teach them what they need to know. Hacker parents often take it one step further by modifying the kid’s world to allow them to work past a disability. To wit we have an interactive game board to help a toddler learn her shapes and colors.

The toddler in question is [Becca], and her needs are special because of the progressive nature of the blindness that will result from her Usher Syndrome. [Becca] will need visual acuity testing much earlier than most toddlers, but a standard eye chart is meaningless to kids before they get their letters. This is where Lea shapes come in – a set of four shapes that are used to make visual testing a game and help practitioners assess what a child can and cannot see.

[Jake] and his wife [Beth] were advised to familiarize [Becca] with the shapes, but all she wanted to do was eat the printed sheet. In order to make the task more entertaining, [Jake] built an interactive board where brightly colored Lea shapes trigger the room lights to change to the same color as the block when it’s inserted into the correct spot on the board, as a visual reward. Reed switches, magnets, and an Arduino comprise the game logic, and the board communicates to the Philips Hue smart bulbs over an NRF24L01. The video below also shows some cool under-bed lights and a very engaged [Becca] learning her shapes and colors.

As we expected when we last covered his efforts to help [Rebecca], [Jake] has leveraged the Raspberry Pi he used as a hub for the stairwell lighting project. We’re looking forward to seeing what else he comes up with, and to see how [Becca] is thriving.


Filed under: Medical hacks, misc hacks

The Peeqo Robot Communicates Using Only Animated GIFs

animated GIFs work great and are very expressive

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The post The Peeqo Robot Communicates Using Only Animated GIFs appeared first on Make: DIY Projects and Ideas for Makers.