Posts with «raspberry pi» label

Learning Microcontrollers and Robotics in the DroneBot Workshop

Discover an excellent YouTube channel for learning hobby electronics, microcontrollers, robotics, and drones.

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Vintage Sewing Machine to Computerized Embroidery Machine

It is February of 2018. Do you remember what you were doing in December of 2012? If you’re [juppiter], you were starting your CNC Embroidery Machine which would not be completed for more than half of a decade. Results speak for themselves, but this may be the last time we see a first-generation Raspberry Pi without calling it retro.

The heart of the build is a vintage Borletti sewing machine, and if you like machinery porn, you’re going to enjoy the video after the break. The brains of the machine are an Arduino UNO filled with GRBL goodness and the Pi which is running CherryPy. For muscles, there are three Postep25 stepper drivers and corresponding NEMA 17 stepper motors.

The first two axes are for an X-Y table responsible for moving the fabric through the machine. The third axis is the flywheel. The rigidity of the fabric frame comes from its brass construction which may have been soldered at the kitchen table and supervised by a big orange cat. A rigid frame is the first ingredient in reliable results, but belt tension can’t be understated. His belt tensioning trick may not be new to you, but it was new to some of us. Italian translation may be necessary.

The skills brought together for this build were vast. There was structural soldering, part machining, a microcontroller, and motion control. The first time we heard from [juppiter] was December 2012, and it was the result of a Portable CNC Mill which likely had some influence on this creation. Between then, he also shared his quarter-gobbling arcade cabinet with us.

Turn your raspberry pi robot into internet controlled telepresence robot.

Hi guys, 

My name is Jill, and I've been working on an open telepresence platform (letsrobot.tv) for any kind of robot you can think of, and i wanted to open it up to more people. It's kind of a cross between telepresence and live-streaming. You can basically hook up any robot that can run our software to the site for anyone on the internet to control. We have an API & documentation to help you get started.

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Turn your raspberry pi robot into internet controlled telepresence robot.

Hi guys, 

My name is Jill, and I've been working on an open telepresence platform (letsrobot.tv) for any kind of robot you can think of, and i wanted to open it up to more people. It's kind of a cross between telepresence and live-streaming. You can basically hook up any robot that can run our software to the site for anyone on the internet to control. We have an API & documentation to help you get started.

read more

Arduino and Pi Breathe New Life into Jukebox

What do you do when someone gives you a Wurlitzer 3100 jukebox from 1969, but keeps all the records? If you are like [Tijuana Rick], you grab an Arduino and a Rasberry Pi and turn it into a really awesome digital music player.

We’ll grant you, making a music player out of a Raspberry Pi isn’t all that cutting edge, but restoration and integration work is really impressive. The machine had many broken switches that had been hastily repaired, so [Rick] had to learn to create silicone molds and cast resin to create replacements. You can see and hear the end result in the video below.

[Rick] was frustrated with jukebox software he could find, until he found some Python code from [Thomas Sprinkmeier]. [Rick] used that code as a base and customized it for his needs.

There’s not much “how to” detail about the castings for the switches, but there are lots of photos and the results were great. We wondered if he considered putting fake 45s in the machine so it at least looked like it was playing vinyl.

Of course, you don’t need an old piece of hardware to make a jukebox. Or, you can compromise and build out a replica.

 

 


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, Raspberry Pi

Maker Spotlight: Daniel Zimmerman

An engineering manager, Daniel Zimmerman enjoys tinkering on basement tech projects that further automate his home.

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The post Maker Spotlight: Daniel Zimmerman appeared first on Make: DIY Projects and Ideas for Makers.

Latskap Semi-Automatic Liquor Cabinet

A well-stocked liquor cabinet is a necessity for the classy gentleman or gentlelady who likes to entertain. Having the proper spirits and mixers on hand to make anything from a martini to a sidecar is always a solid way to ensure guests have a good time at your cocktail party. In the past, a beautifully crafted cherry or walnut liquor cabinet was enough to impress visitors with your affluence. These days, if you don’t want to look like a pauper, you have to take it a step further.

[Elias Bakken] and his uncle [Mike Moulton] have decided to take liquor cabinets into the 21st century with a semi-automatic liquor cabinet called Latskap. The project is still in progress, and in the prototyping stage, but their build log on Hackaday.io is showing a lot of potential. It shouldn’t be long before they have a fully functional prototype finished.

Latskap has a few primary functions: the first is that it automatically opens when someone approaches it. Then the thirsty guest can use the touchscreen to choose the drink they’d like from the menu. The bottles inside the cabinet are resting on NeoPixels, and the system lights up the liquor and mixer bottles needed for that drink. Finally, a scale at the front of the cabinet weighs the glass as ingredients are poured, and tells the parched patron when they’ve poured the correct amount for their drink.

We’ve seen liquor dispensers in the past that are designed to mix a cocktail all on their own, but the Latskap takes an interesting new approach. The main benefit of this design is that the number of bottles is limited only by how much room is available. There are no complex pumping systems necessary. We’re definitely looking forward to seeing the finished product!


Filed under: Beer Hacks
Hack a Day 18 Aug 16:30

Visual Development with XOD

Early programmers had to represent code using binary, octal, or hex numbers. This gave way quickly to representing programs as text to be assembled, compiled, or interpreted by the computer. Even today, this remains the most common way to program, but there have been attempts to develop more visual ways to create programs graphically. If you program microcontrollers like the Arduino, you should check out XOD and see how you like visually creating software. The software is open source and currently, can target the Arduino or Raspberry Pi.

You can launch the IDE in a web browser or download a local copy. You transfer nodes from a palette into a grid-like workspace. These nodes might be inputs, outputs, processing blocks, or represent real-world I/O devices. Nodes have inputs and outputs of specific types and you connect them together, connecting like types only, although there are blocks that can convert.

For example, to the right is a simple set of nodes that forms the prototypical flashing LED program. A clock node creates a pulse that toggles a memory element and a digital output accepts both the signal and a constant value indicating which port it represents.

This is a simple example, but it does show the intuitive flow of joining nodes. There is a reasonable array of node types and sufficient documentation.

There are out-of-the-box nodes for ultrasonic sensors, temperature sensors, servos, LCDs, buttons, and H-bridges. You can create your own super-nodes (patches) and you also can make multiple disjointed flows to execute more than one task at a time.

When you generate the code you get a lot of boilerplate that sets up the run time system and the nodes you use. Your main code appears to be in an evaluate function. For example, here’s a snippet of the code that corresponds to the simple graphical blink program:

void evaluate(Context ctx) {
State* state = getState(ctx);
TimeMs tNow = transactionTime();
TimeMs dt = getValue<input_IVAL>(ctx) * 1000;
TimeMs tNext = tNow + dt;

if (isInputDirty<input_RST>(ctx)) {
if (dt == 0) {
state->nextTrig = 0;
clearTimeout(ctx);
} else if (state->nextTrig < tNow || state->nextTrig > tNext) {
state->nextTrig = tNext;
setTimeout(ctx, dt);
}
} else {
// It was a scheduled tick
emitValue<output_TICK>(ctx, 1);
state->nextTrig = tNext;
setTimeout(ctx, dt);
}
}

There are a few rough edges, which isn’t surprising for new software. For one thing, nodes have fixed numbers of inputs and outputs. So if you want, for example, a ten-input AND gate, you’ll have to build it. Another apparent issue is there is no way we found to select a lot of items at once. If you decide you want to move a whole bunch of nodes down to make room for something new, you are going to be in for a lot of work.

There are other drag-and-drop programming languages, of course. We’ve covered Scratch for the Arduino and the Raspberry Pi, before. However, this is a dead simple way to try flow-based programming with minimal setup.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, Raspberry Pi

Maker Pro News: Hardware is Still Hard, The Rise of Re-Kickstarting, and More

Maker pros showcase exactly how difficult it is to make hardware, but promote how much easier it is to become a Kickstarter star.

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The post Maker Pro News: Hardware is Still Hard, The Rise of Re-Kickstarting, and More appeared first on Make: DIY Projects and Ideas for Makers.

From the New Issue of Make: Our 8 Standout Dev Boards

These eight boards stand out for their advanced specs, built-in offerings, and, in some cases, their innovative interface options.

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The post From the New Issue of Make: Our 8 Standout Dev Boards appeared first on Make: DIY Projects and Ideas for Makers.