Posts with «raspberry pi» label

Raspberry Pi Project

Hey guys,

I'm starting out a project in which I want to build a Raspberry Pi Self Driving Robot. The basic tasks the robot will perform are:

  • Lane tracking using RPi Camera and OpenCV3 + Python
  • Obstacle detection with Ultrasonic sensor + input from RPi Camera(if possible)

The materials I currently plan to use in this project are:

read more

Let's Make Robots 01 Jan 15:42

Raspberry Pi Project

Hey guys,

I'm starting out a project in which I want to build a Raspberry Pi Self Driving Robot. The basic tasks the robot will perform are:

  • Lane tracking using RPi Camera and OpenCV3 + Python
  • Obstacle detection with Ultrasonic sensor + input from RPi Camera(if possible)

The materials I currently plan to use in this project are:

read more

Let's Make Robots 01 Jan 15:42

Raspberry Pi Project

Hey guys,

I'm starting out a project in which I want to build a Raspberry Pi Self Driving Robot. The basic tasks the robot will perform are:

  • Lane tracking using RPi Camera and OpenCV3 + Python
  • Obstacle detection with Ultrasonic sensor + input from RPi Camera(if possible)

The materials I currently plan to use in this project are:

read more

Let's Make Robots 01 Jan 15:42

Raspberry Pi Project

Hey guys,

I'm starting out a project in which I want to build a Raspberry Pi Self Driving Robot. The basic tasks the robot will perform are:

  • Lane tracking using RPi Camera and OpenCV3 + Python
  • Obstacle detection with Ultrasonic sensor + input from RPi Camera(if possible)

The materials I currently plan to use in this project are:

read more

Let's Make Robots 01 Jan 15:42

8 Festive Projects to Ring in the New Year

Ring in 2017 with some DIY projects made in the spirit of New Year's Eve.

Read more on MAKE

The post 8 Festive Projects to Ring in the New Year appeared first on Make: DIY Projects and Ideas for Makers.

Raspberry Pi and Alexa Make Teddy Ruxpin Smarter than the Average Bear

Behold the unholy union of Amazon’s Alexa and that feature-limited animatronic bear from the 80s, Teddy Ruxpin. Alexa Ruxpin?

As if stuffing Alexa inside a talking fish weren’t bad enough, now Amazon’s virtual assistant can talk to you through the creepy retro plush thanks to [Tinkernut]’s trip down memory lane. Having located a Teddy Ruxpin on eBay for far less than the original $70 that priced it out from under his childhood Christmas tree, [Tinkernut] quickly learned that major surgery would be necessary to revive the Ruxpin. The first video below shows the original servos being gutted and modern micro servos grafted in, allowing control of the mouth, eyes, and nose via an Arduino.

With the bear once again in control of its faculties, [Tinkernut] embarked on giving it something to talk about. A Raspberry Pi running AlexaPi joined the bear’s recently vacated thorax with the audio output split between the bear’s speaker and the analog input on the Arduino. The result is a reasonable animation, although we’d say a little tweaking of the Arduino script might help the syncing. And those eyes and that nose really need to get into the game as well. But not a bad start at all.

This isn’t the first time that Teddy Ruxpin has gone under the knife in the name of hacks, and it likely won’t be the last. And the way toy manufacturers are going, they might just beat us hackers to the punch.


Filed under: toy hacks

Hack your Teddy Ruxpin with Alexa, Arduino and Raspberry Pi

If you had a Teddy Ruxpin in the ’80s and ’90s, you probably remember inserting special tapes and hearing him read stories to you. Whether you loved or hated the little bear, it was hard to forget his weirdly moving mouth and eyes. Today though, with small and cheap development boards readily available, this mechanical system is just begging for a retrofit.

In this project, hacker “Tinkernut” employed an Arduino to sense the intensity of a sound input, and in turn used it to allow Ruxpin to lip sync to any audio source. This could be a song, story, or even output from a virtual assistant.

He chose the latter option, and after installing Alexa on a Raspberry Pi, used the two boards in tandem to control the retro toy. With this setup, he can ask it such questions as “how tall is the empire state building?” and have it answer back with audio and a semi-synced bear mouth.

Have an old Ruxpin lying around? Give new life to it by following Tinkernut’s instructions here.

10 Merry Circuits to Illuminate Your Holiday

This holiday season there are so many ways to customize your lights with DIY electronics.

Read more on MAKE

The post 10 Merry Circuits to Illuminate Your Holiday appeared first on Make: DIY Projects and Ideas for Makers.

Raspberry Pi Radio Makes the Sweet Music of Bacteria

We’ve noticed a lot of musical groups are named after insects. Probably has something to do with the Beatles. (If you study that for a while you’ll spot the homophonic pun, and yes we know that the Crickets inspired the name.) There’s also Iron Butterfly, Adam Ant, and quite a few more. A recent art project by a Mexican team — Micro-ritmos — might inspire some musical groups to be named after bacteria.

The group used geobacter — a kind of bacteria found in soil — a Raspberry Pi, an Arduino, and a camera to build an interesting device. As it looks at the bacteria and uses SuperCollider to create music and lighting from the patterns. You can see a video of Micro-ritmos, below.

Music is a bit subjective, of course. We thought the music sounded a little oppressive. Not sure how much of that is the code and how much is the characteristics of the bacteria itself.

We’ve seen SuperCollider in a banana piano, before (these are popular because for most people bananas have appeal). We’ve also seen other natural processes generating sound like this project for presenting the sunset to the blind.


Filed under: Android Hacks, musical hacks, Raspberry Pi

A Trove Of Arcade Projects

[Ryan Bates] loves arcade games, any arcade games. Which is why you can find claw machines, coin pushers, video games, and more on his website.

We’ve covered his work before with his Venduino project. We also really enjoyed his 3D printed arcade joystick based off the design of a commercial variant. His coin pushing machine could help some us finally live our dream of getting a big win out of the most insidious gambling machine at arcades meant for children.

Speaking of frustrating gambling machines for children, he also built his own claw machine. Nothing like enabling test mode and winning a fluffy teddy bear or an Arduino!

It’s quite a large site and there’s good content hidden in nooks and crannys, so explore. He also sells kits, but it’s well balanced against a lot of open source files if you’d like to do it yourself. If you’re wondering how he gets it all done, his energy drink review might provide a clue.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, misc hacks, Raspberry Pi