Posts with «raspberry pi» label

The Peeqo Robot Communicates Using Only Animated GIFs

animated GIFs work great and are very expressive

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The post The Peeqo Robot Communicates Using Only Animated GIFs appeared first on Make: DIY Projects and Ideas for Makers.

Play digital music on this analog interface

“I’m a big fan of digital music, especially Spotify. The ability to dial-up a much loved song I’ve not heard for ages or discover new music are just some of the benefits I never tire of,” writes UK-based designer Brendan Dawes. “Yet the lack of physicality to this digital medium has always left me wanting. I still own vinyl and a turntable and I love the ritual of physically flicking through what to place on the platter and then wait for the needle to drop on the spinning vinyl.”

To bridge the gap between the digital and analog worlds, Dawes decided to create what he calls the “Plastic Player.” The playful interface features a Raspberry Pi running Pi MusicBox connected to his 50-year-old B&O stereo, and an Arduino Yún with an NFC shield.

The “albums” themselves are made from a box of slide mounts with tiny NFC stickers on the back. When Dawes drops one in place, the Arduino identifies the tag, matches it to a specific record, turns on a backlight, and then communicates via WiFi with the Pi MusicBox API to play the tunes.

Removing the cartridge from the device pauses the track. But that’s not all. There are also three buttons on top, which can be used to skip, go back, or stop a song.

It’s often easy to romanticise the past, convincing ourselves that things were better back then when really I think that’s just not the case. I’ve discovered way more music since moving to Spotify then I ever did in record shops. What I do like though is the physicality of choosing an album to play and this system is an attempt to blend the good parts of both worlds. The future will continue to be digitised and I embrace that, but I think there’s a space in between the digital and the analog to create interactions that are filled with the inconvenience of what it is to be human.

You can read more about the Plastic Player on Dawes’ website, and see it in action below!

(Photos: Brendan Dawes)

Raspberry Pi Project

Hey guys,

I'm starting out a project in which I want to build a Raspberry Pi Self Driving Robot. The basic tasks the robot will perform are:

  • Lane tracking using RPi Camera and OpenCV3 + Python
  • Obstacle detection with Ultrasonic sensor + input from RPi Camera(if possible)

The materials I currently plan to use in this project are:

read more

Let's Make Robots 01 Jan 15:42

Raspberry Pi Project

Hey guys,

I'm starting out a project in which I want to build a Raspberry Pi Self Driving Robot. The basic tasks the robot will perform are:

  • Lane tracking using RPi Camera and OpenCV3 + Python
  • Obstacle detection with Ultrasonic sensor + input from RPi Camera(if possible)

The materials I currently plan to use in this project are:

read more

Let's Make Robots 01 Jan 15:42

Raspberry Pi Project

Hey guys,

I'm starting out a project in which I want to build a Raspberry Pi Self Driving Robot. The basic tasks the robot will perform are:

  • Lane tracking using RPi Camera and OpenCV3 + Python
  • Obstacle detection with Ultrasonic sensor + input from RPi Camera(if possible)

The materials I currently plan to use in this project are:

read more

Let's Make Robots 01 Jan 15:42

Raspberry Pi Project

Hey guys,

I'm starting out a project in which I want to build a Raspberry Pi Self Driving Robot. The basic tasks the robot will perform are:

  • Lane tracking using RPi Camera and OpenCV3 + Python
  • Obstacle detection with Ultrasonic sensor + input from RPi Camera(if possible)

The materials I currently plan to use in this project are:

read more

Let's Make Robots 01 Jan 15:42

8 Festive Projects to Ring in the New Year

Ring in 2017 with some DIY projects made in the spirit of New Year's Eve.

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The post 8 Festive Projects to Ring in the New Year appeared first on Make: DIY Projects and Ideas for Makers.

Raspberry Pi and Alexa Make Teddy Ruxpin Smarter than the Average Bear

Behold the unholy union of Amazon’s Alexa and that feature-limited animatronic bear from the 80s, Teddy Ruxpin. Alexa Ruxpin?

As if stuffing Alexa inside a talking fish weren’t bad enough, now Amazon’s virtual assistant can talk to you through the creepy retro plush thanks to [Tinkernut]’s trip down memory lane. Having located a Teddy Ruxpin on eBay for far less than the original $70 that priced it out from under his childhood Christmas tree, [Tinkernut] quickly learned that major surgery would be necessary to revive the Ruxpin. The first video below shows the original servos being gutted and modern micro servos grafted in, allowing control of the mouth, eyes, and nose via an Arduino.

With the bear once again in control of its faculties, [Tinkernut] embarked on giving it something to talk about. A Raspberry Pi running AlexaPi joined the bear’s recently vacated thorax with the audio output split between the bear’s speaker and the analog input on the Arduino. The result is a reasonable animation, although we’d say a little tweaking of the Arduino script might help the syncing. And those eyes and that nose really need to get into the game as well. But not a bad start at all.

This isn’t the first time that Teddy Ruxpin has gone under the knife in the name of hacks, and it likely won’t be the last. And the way toy manufacturers are going, they might just beat us hackers to the punch.


Filed under: toy hacks

Hack your Teddy Ruxpin with Alexa, Arduino and Raspberry Pi

If you had a Teddy Ruxpin in the ’80s and ’90s, you probably remember inserting special tapes and hearing him read stories to you. Whether you loved or hated the little bear, it was hard to forget his weirdly moving mouth and eyes. Today though, with small and cheap development boards readily available, this mechanical system is just begging for a retrofit.

In this project, hacker “Tinkernut” employed an Arduino to sense the intensity of a sound input, and in turn used it to allow Ruxpin to lip sync to any audio source. This could be a song, story, or even output from a virtual assistant.

He chose the latter option, and after installing Alexa on a Raspberry Pi, used the two boards in tandem to control the retro toy. With this setup, he can ask it such questions as “how tall is the empire state building?” and have it answer back with audio and a semi-synced bear mouth.

Have an old Ruxpin lying around? Give new life to it by following Tinkernut’s instructions here.

10 Merry Circuits to Illuminate Your Holiday

This holiday season there are so many ways to customize your lights with DIY electronics.

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The post 10 Merry Circuits to Illuminate Your Holiday appeared first on Make: DIY Projects and Ideas for Makers.