Posts with «opencv» label

Desktop Robot Head and Arm

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What does it do?

Desktop Robot

Hi Everyone. Its been a long time since I last posted a robot project on here but I wanted to share my latest project with you all. I have always enjoyed making various types of robot but I have a particular soft spot for desktop robots. I like the idea of a little robot pal sat next to me on the desk that I can develop when I get the spare time.

Cost to build

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Finished project

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Jetsonbot

Primary image

What does it do?

Avoid obstacles with vision

Hardware overview is in the video with a better description.

Jetson TK1 processes images from the USB webcam and the two Raspberry Pi NoIR cameras then sends commands to the Arduino Mega in order to move autonomously around the environment avoiding obstacles.

The software is custom written and uses OpenCV for image processing.  No ROS, no SLAM, no neural nets or whatever.

Cost to build

Embedded video

Finished project

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Type

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Weight

Raspberry Pi Project

Hey guys,

I'm starting out a project in which I want to build a Raspberry Pi Self Driving Robot. The basic tasks the robot will perform are:

  • Lane tracking using RPi Camera and OpenCV3 + Python
  • Obstacle detection with Ultrasonic sensor + input from RPi Camera(if possible)

The materials I currently plan to use in this project are:

read more

Let's Make Robots 01 Jan 15:42

Raspberry Pi Project

Hey guys,

I'm starting out a project in which I want to build a Raspberry Pi Self Driving Robot. The basic tasks the robot will perform are:

  • Lane tracking using RPi Camera and OpenCV3 + Python
  • Obstacle detection with Ultrasonic sensor + input from RPi Camera(if possible)

The materials I currently plan to use in this project are:

read more

Let's Make Robots 01 Jan 15:42

Raspberry Pi Project

Hey guys,

I'm starting out a project in which I want to build a Raspberry Pi Self Driving Robot. The basic tasks the robot will perform are:

  • Lane tracking using RPi Camera and OpenCV3 + Python
  • Obstacle detection with Ultrasonic sensor + input from RPi Camera(if possible)

The materials I currently plan to use in this project are:

read more

Let's Make Robots 01 Jan 15:42

Raspberry Pi Project

Hey guys,

I'm starting out a project in which I want to build a Raspberry Pi Self Driving Robot. The basic tasks the robot will perform are:

  • Lane tracking using RPi Camera and OpenCV3 + Python
  • Obstacle detection with Ultrasonic sensor + input from RPi Camera(if possible)

The materials I currently plan to use in this project are:

read more

Let's Make Robots 01 Jan 15:42

The Most Immersive Pinball Machine: Project Supernova

Over at [Truthlabs], a 30 year old pinball machine was diagnosed with a major flaw in its game design: It could only entertain one person at a time. [Dan] and his colleagues set out to change this, transforming the ol’ pinball legend “Firepower” into a spectacular, immersive gaming experience worthy of the 21st century.

A major limitation they wanted to overcome was screen size. A projector mounted to the ceiling should turn the entire wall behind the machine into a massive 15-foot playfield for anyone in the room to enjoy.

 

With so much space to fill, the team assembled a visual concept tailored to blend seamlessly with the original storyline of the arcade classic, studying the machine’s artwork and digging deep into the sci-fi archives. They then translated their ideas into 3D graphics utilizing Cinema4D and WebGL along with the usual designer’s toolbox. Lasers and explosions were added, ready to be triggered by game interactions on the machine.

To hook the augmentation into the pinball machine’s own game progress, they elaborated an elegant solution, incorporating OpenCV and OCR, to read all five of the machine’s 7 segment displays from a single webcam. An Arduino inside the machine taps into the numerous mechanical switches and indicator lamps, keeping a Node.js server updated about pressed buttons, hits, the “Lange Change” and plunged balls.

The result is the impressive demonstration of both passion and skill you can see in the video below. We really like the custom shader effects. How could we ever play pinball without them?

 


Filed under: classic hacks, video hacks

Clubs in UK

I want to build an autonomous mobile robot with wheels or tracks, vision, arms and carrying ability (for example a tray area) that can navigate in a flat inside or outside domestic environment (not both).

I am UK based, have some old OO programming experience and general PC -based programming experience but no electronics expertise apart from basic school physics . 

I work full-time so this would very much be a part-time project.  From looking around I'm thinking of perhaps using ROS, OpenCV and maybe Arduino components but would like to know

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Googly Eyes Follow You Around the Room

If you’re looking to build the next creepy Halloween decoration or simply thinking about trying out OpenCV for the first time, this next project will have you covered. [Glen] made a pair of giant googly eyes that follow you around the room using some servos and some very powerful software.

The project was documented in three parts. In Part 1, [Glen] models and builds the eyes themselves, including installing the servo motors that will eventually move them around. The second part involves an Arduino and power supply that will control the servos, and the third part goes over using OpenCV to track faces.

This part of the project is arguably the most interesting if you’re new to OpenCV; [Glen] uses this software package to recognize different faces. From there, the computer picks out the most prominent face and sends commands to the Arduino to move the eyes to the appropriate position. The project goes into great detail, from Arduino code to installing Ubuntu to running OpenCV for the first time!

We’ve featured some of [Glen]’s projects before, like his FPGA-driven LED wall, and it’s good to see he’s still making great things!

 


Filed under: video hacks

Eye-Controlled Wheelchair Advances from Talented Teenage Hackers

[Myrijam Stoetzer] and her friend [Paul Foltin], 14 and 15 years old kids from Duisburg, Germany are working on a eye movement controller wheel chair. They were inspired by the Eyewriter Project which we’ve been following for a long time. Eyewriter was built for Tony Quan a.k.a Tempt1 by his friends. In 2003, Tempt1 was diagnosed with the degenerative nerve disorder ALS  and is now fully paralyzed except for his eyes, but has been able to use the EyeWriter to continue his art.

This is their first big leap moving up from Lego Mindstorms. The eye tracker part consists of a safety glass frame, a regular webcam, and IR SMD LEDs. They removed the IR blocking filter from the webcam to make it work in all lighting conditions. The image processing is handled by an Odroid U3 – a compact, low cost ARM Quad Core SBC capable of running Ubuntu, Android, and other Linux OS systems. They initially tried the Raspberry Pi which managed to do just about 3fps, compared to 13~15fps from the Odroid. The code is written in Python and uses OpenCV libraries. They are learning Python on the go. An Arduino is used to control the motor via an H-bridge controller, and also to calibrate the eye tracker. Potentiometers connected to the Arduino’s analog ports allow adjusting the tracker to individual requirements.

The web cam video stream is filtered to obtain the pupil position, and this is compared to four presets for forward, reverse, left and right. The presets can be adjusted using the potentiometers. An enable switch, manually activated at present is used to ensure the wheel chair moves only when commanded. Their plan is to later replace this switch with tongue activation or maybe cheek muscle twitch detection.

First tests were on a small mockup robotic platform. After winning a local competition, they bought a second-hand wheel chair and started all over again. This time, they tried the Raspberry Pi 2 model B, and it was able to work at about 8~9fps. Not as well as the Odroid, but at half the cost, it seemed like a workable solution since their aim is to make it as cheap as possible. They would appreciate receiving any help to improve the performance – maybe improving their code or utilising all the four cores more efficiently. For the bigger wheelchair, they used recycled car windshield wiper motors and some relays to switch them. They also used a 3D printer to print an enclosure for the camera and wheels to help turn the wheelchair. Further details are also available on [Myrijam]’s blog. They documented their build (German, pdf) and have their sights set on the German National Science Fair. The team is working on English translation of the documentation and will release all design files and source code under a CC by NC license soon.


Filed under: Medical hacks, Raspberry Pi, video hacks