Posts with «quadruped» label

Quad Walker

Primary image

What does it do?

Been working on a building a quad walker probably for a year now. What started of a coding project has now ended up with me learning how to 3d model and building a kit 3d printer.

Along with scope of the project, the size of walker also grew. It was originally planned to use small 9g servers and probably end up 20cm across in total. Though I moved to using standard r/c card servos and as a result each leg will be around 20cm. No idea how big the body will need to be to house everything else.

Cost to build

Embedded video

Finished project

Number

Time to build

Type

legs

URL to more information

Weight

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Quad Walker

Primary image

What does it do?

Been working on a building a quad walker probably for a year now. What started of a coding project has now ended up with me learning how to 3d model and building a kit 3d printer.

Along with scope of the project, the size of walker also grew. It was originally planned to use small 9g servers and probably end up 20cm across in total. Though I moved to using standard r/c card servos and as a result each leg will be around 20cm. No idea how big the body will need to be to house everything else.

Cost to build

Embedded video

Finished project

Number

Time to build

Type

legs

URL to more information

Weight

read more

Quad Walker

Primary image

What does it do?

Been working on a building a quad walker probably for a year now. What started of a coding project has now ended up with me learning how to 3d model and building a kit 3d printer.

Along with scope of the project, the size of walker also grew. It was originally planned to use small 9g servers and probably end up 20cm across in total. Though I moved to using standard r/c card servos and as a result each leg will be around 20cm. No idea how big the body will need to be to house everything else.

Cost to build

Embedded video

Finished project

Number

Time to build

Type

legs

URL to more information

Weight

read more

Quad Walker

Primary image

What does it do?

Been working on a building a quad walker probably for a year now. What started of a coding project has now ended up with me learning how to 3d model and building a kit 3d printer.

The size of walker also grew, it started of using little 9g servos and now using full-size r/c car servos.

At moment, I’ve only modelled the leg at the moment, though I’m reasonable confident this will be the near final version before starting the body.

Will post more soon

Cost to build

Embedded video

Finished project

Number

Time to build

Type

legs

URL to more information

Weight

Making a Vintage Star Wars AT-AT toy walk with an Arduino

Dave Stein is a software engineer during the day and a tinkerer on Arduino projects in his free time after work. He submitted on the blog his first Arduino project with the goal of powering his old AT-AT Walker toy (mid 1980s) with Arduino Uno and make it walk and perform some of the functions we see in the Star Wars movies.

AT-AT (All Terrain Armored Transport) are four-legged combat walkers 22.5mt (73.8ft) tall of the Galactic Empire, one of its most famous military symbols introduced  in “Star Wars V: The Empire strikes back”, and we may see them again in the next weeks on “Star Wars: The Force Awakens” the upcoming episode of the saga opening December 18th.

The AT-AT walker toy updated by Dave is controlled by a wired Xbox 360 controller that interfaces with a computer and transports a signal to the Arduino Uno for walker movement:

The left and right triggers move the walker forward and backward while the right stick moves the head horizontally. If you have ever played with this toy you may remember it was clumsy and difficult to move. In my project I wanted to learn about and conquer the difficulties of quadrupedal movement. The realization process for my project involved a massive amount of trial and error, research, and failures. I have to say that I failed many more times than I succeeded with configuring the servos with the Arduino. I went down many long roads to learn about prototyping with the breadboard, soldering, and redesigns of the final product. The most difficult part of the project aside from adjusting the gait of the walker for balance and movement was providing enough power to the servos without frying the microcontroller or any of the components. I was finally able to overcome these difficulties by implementing the Adafruit servo shield.

Check AtAt Project website for all info, parts list and upcoming tutorial!

Pico-Kubik Quadruped Fits in the Palm of your Hand

Most of the legged robots we see here are of the hexapod variety, and with good reason. Hexapods are very stable and can easily move even if one or more of the legs has been disabled. [Radomir] has taken this a step farther and has become somewhat of an expert on the more technically difficult quadruped robot, building smaller and smaller ones each time. He has been hard at work on his latest four-legged creation called the Pico-Kubik, and this one will fit in the palm of your hand.

The Pico-Kubik runs Micropython on a VoCore board, which allows for it to have a small software footprint to complement its small hardware footprint. It accomplishes the latter primarily through the use of HK-282A Ultra-Micro Servos, an Arduino Pro Mini, and a tiny lithium ion battery. It’s still a work in progress, but the robot can already crawl across the tabletop.

This isn’t [Radomir]’s first time at the tiny quadruped rodeo, either. He has already built the Nano-Kubik and the µKubik, all of which followed the first (aptly-named) Kubik quadruped. Based on the use of SI prefixes, we can only assume the next one will be the hella-Kubik!


Filed under: robots hacks

quadruped > awaiting rebuild :)

Primary image

What does it do?

navigated around ultrasonic

My first attempt to build and run a quadruped. Parts of laser cut acrylic. Powered with an arduino uno and sensorshield. Total of 12 micro- servo's, partially metal geared. It proved very difficult to align the servo's right. It walked, it turned. But was abandoned after I blew up most of the servo's by feeding them 7,4 Volts instead of 5 :P

Anyway, it's pretty much a copy of this one: http://letsmakerobots.com/node/34412

I had to use 3mm acrylic, because the lasercut firm had no 4 mm available.

Cost to build

$70,00

Embedded video

Finished project

Complete

Number

Time to build

30 hours

Type

URL to more information

Weight

450 grams

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Small Quadruped Robot

Primary image

What does it do?

Navigate around via ultrasound

Hi, I'm new to LMR as a member. But I've been browsing around LMR to learn robotics. First, sorry for my bad English. I finished making my quadruped robot a couple weeks ago. It was my first robotic project using microcontroller. In fact, it was my first microcontroller project. Unfortunately it wasn't well documented during the making process since I didn't plan to publish it before. :( So here is what I can collect from scattered file in my PC..

 

 

Cost to build

$150,00

Embedded video

Finished project

Complete

Number

Time to build

Type

URL to more information

Weight

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3d Printed Quadruped

Primary image

What does it do?

Obstacle avoidance via ping, hand tracking (eventually)

Still lots to do, but I finally got this guy printed and assembled. He has 3DOF per leg using cheap 9g servos :( I'm using Inverse kinematics for his movement. I just started programming him and got the IK working for one leg. The ping((( is just stuck in the mega2560 for now. I'll be adding a tilt/pan head when I get more servos, and the wiring needs some cleaning up :p I just found out about LMR last week and so far it's awesome! Hopefully by the end of next weekend I'll have some walk sequence video to show off.

Cost to build

$120,00

Embedded video

Finished project

Number

Time to build

20 hours

Type

legs

URL to more information

Weight

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An Arduino Based Quadruped Robot

Sure, we see hexapods all the time at [HAD], but moving around with four legs can be more tricky kinematics-wise. This Instructable shows you how to make one out of balsa wood.

Although one might not think of balsa to make their robot out of [vexedpheonix] explains that this was chosen because it’s extremely light and easy to work with. Since he was trying to keep costs down, the cheapest servos available were used. These weren’t all that powerful, so the lighter the body the better! According to the included bill of materials, he was able to keep the entire robot build under $100.

According to the article, the hardest part was making four copies of the same leg. We might suggest using a CNC router, but building one would obviously add a huge layer of complication to the project!

Thanks for the tip on this one [SteveT]! Be sure to check out the video of this little robot waving one of it’s legs or trying to walk after the break!


If you’d rather see a hexapod in action, why not check out this one!


Filed under: arduino hacks, robots hacks