Posts with «alarm» label

Tiny UV Alarm

 

So as commented my son (4) has a rare condition so he can't be exposed to UV light (the Sun, halogen and some other artificial lights). There are other issues but UV exposition is a high risk.

At the moment the sensitive device to measures the ambient UV light:

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Let's Make Robots 05 Apr 23:24
alarm  arduino  cheapduino  uv  

Maker Spotlight: Cynthia Cho

Arduino based Security Project Using Cayenne


 

Description

This is an Arduino based home security project that uses the power of "Cayenne" for extraordinary capabilities.

Cayenne Beta

Cayenne is a new IoT drag and drop platform originally released for the Raspberry Pi, but now available for Arduino. Cayenne makes the task of connecting your Arduino to the internet as simple as possible. All of the complexity of internet connectivity is hidden within the Cayenne library.

You can easily create a Network of Arduinos and build an IoT system which can be managed and operated within the Cayenne dashboard. This dashboard is accessible through your browser or via the Cayenne smart phone app (on IOS or Android).

The feature I liked the most, was the ability to change the position of sensors or actuators on the Arduino without having to re-upload Arduino code. I could manage the changed position from within the Cayenne platform. The other feature that I liked was the ability to setup actions based on custom triggers. You can use Cayenne to trigger a whole range of functions, for example: play a sound, move a motor, light up an LED, or to send alert notifications via email or SMS.

Cayenne is in Beta at the moment, so there are a few minor bugs here and there, but overall - I give it a thumbs up - it is definitely worth checking out.
 

Here is a link to the Cayenne Beta Program:
**Cayenne Beta Link**



              Source: myDevices Media Kit

 

Home Security Project Summary

In order to fully experience this new IoT platform, I decided to create a project to really put it through its paces. This is what my Security Project will need:

  1. It will use two Arduinos, one connected to the internet via an Ethernet shield, and the other via WIFI.
  2. Two detectors - a PIR sensor and a laser trip wire.
  3. If the sensors are tripped, the person has 10 seconds to present an RFID tag to the Grove RFID reader:
    • If a valid RFID tag is SUCCESSFULLY presented within the time limit, a nice personalised greeting will be played to that person using a Grove - Serial MP3 player
    • If a valid RFID FAILS to be presented within the time limit, an Alarm will sound, and I will be notified of the intrusion via an SMS alert.
  4. The Cayenne dashboard will show the status of the sensors, and I will have full control over my security system via the web interface (or smartphone app).
  5. The sensors will be attached to a different Arduino to that of the Grove MP3 player and the RFID tag reader, which means that there will have to be some level of communication between the two Arduinos. In fact, the cross communication will be vital to the success of this project.


 
 
 

Project Video



 
 
 
 

 

Flow Diagrams:

Main Flow Diagram

The following flow diagram shows the Security project process. It is a high level view of the decisions being made by each Arduino in response to various events.  


 

Triggers Flow Diagram

The following flow diagram aims to highlight the various triggers set up within Cayenne to get this Security system to work.  

 
 
 

Arduino IDE and Library Downloads

You will need an Arduino IDE to upload code to the Arduino and the Seeeduino Cloud.
Here is the link to the Arduino IDE: Arduino IDE - download location

The Cayenne service requires that you download and install the Cayenne Library into your Arduino IDE.
You can get the Cayenne Library from here: Cayenne Library File - Download


 

Cayenne Connectivity Setup

The Seeeduino Cloud needs to be prepared for use with Cayenne.
Normal operating/setup instructions can be found here: Seeeduino Cloud WIKI page
 
Once you have successfully connected Seeeduino Cloud to your WIFI network, you can add it to the Cayenne Dashboard by making the following selections from within the Cayenne Web application:

  1. Add New
  2. Device/Widget
  3. Microcontrollers
  4. Arduino
  5. Ensure Seeeduino Cloud is connected to WIFI network - the select the NEXT button
  6. Select - Arduino Yun: Built-in Ethernet - ticked
  7. Providing you have already installed the Cayenne library as described above - you should be able to copy and paste the code to the Arduino IDE and upload to the Seeeduino Cloud.
  8. If successful, you should see the Arduino Yun board appear within the Cayenne Dashboard. If not, then seek help within the Cayenne forum.


 

The Arduino UNO with WIZNET 5100 - Ethernet Shield
also needs to be prepared with Cayenne

  1. Add New
  2. Device/Widget
  3. Microcontrollers
  4. Arduino
  5. Ensure Arduino is powered, and Ethernet shield is connected to your internet router via an Ethernet cable
  6. Select - Arduino Uno: Ethernet Shield W5100 - ticked
  7. Copy and paste the code to the Arduino IDE and upload to the Arduino UNO.
  8. If successful, you should see the Arduino Uno board appear within the Cayenne Dashboard. If not, then seek help within the Cayenne forum.

 


 
If you have the Ethernet shield with the WIZNET 5200 chip, then you may need to download a specific Ethernet library in addition to the Cayenne library.
 
Just follow the instructions within the Automatically generated sketch provided - when you select your specific Arduino/Ethernet/WIFI shield combination. If you need further instructions on connecting your device to Cayenne - then please visit the myDevices website for the online documentation.
 


 
 
 
 

ARDUINO CODE (1)


Code for Arduino UNO with Ethernet Shield:

The following code will need to be uploaded to the Arduino UNO:


 
 
 
 
 

ARDUINO CODE (2)


Code for Seeeduino Cloud:

The following code will need to be uploaded to the Seeeduino Cloud:


 
 
 
 

Fritzing diagram (1)


Fritzing diagram for Arduino UNO with Ethernet

Please click on the picture below for an enlarged version of this fritzing diagram


 
 
 
 

Fritzing diagram (2)


Fritzing diagram for Seeeduino Cloud

Please click on the picture below for an enlarged version of this fritzing diagram


 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Cayenne Dashboard Setup - GUI


The Arduino code only provides half of the functionality of this project. The Cayenne Dashboard needs to be setup to provide the rest of the functionality. The following instructions will show you how to add each of the widgets required for this Home Security project.


Arduino Ethernet - Master Switch

The master switch allows me to turn the security system on and off. When I turn the MASTER SWITCH ON, the laser beam will turn on, and the sensors will start monitoring the area for intruders. This widget is NOT associated with a physical switch/sensor on the Arduino - it uses virtual channel 0. We need to add the Master switch to the dashboard:


  1. Add New
  2. Device/Widget
  3. Actuators
  4. Generic
  5. Digital Output - Control a Digital Output
  6. Widget Name: Master On Off Switch
  7. Select Device: Arduino Ethernet
  8. Connectivity: Virtual
  9. Pin: V0
  10. Choose Widget: Button
  11. Choose Icon: Valve
  12. Step2: Add Actuator
We will add a trigger later to get this button to automatically turn the Laser beam on.


 
 
 

Arduino Ethernet - PIR Sensor

This sensor will be used to detect movement in the room. If a person walks into the room, this sensor will detect movement, and will trigger a message to be played on the Grove Serial MP3 player. The message will aim to get the person to identify themselves. They identify themselves by placing their RFID tag in close proximity to the Grove RFID reader. If the tag is valid, a "Welcome home" message is played on the Grove MP3 player. If a valid tag is not presented to the reader within 10 seconds, an Alarm will go off ("Alarm sound" played on Grove MP3 player.)

The PIR sensor is connected to digital Pin 6 of the Arduino, however, it is mapped to virtual pin 1 for better synchronisation with the Cayenne dashboard. This was done to capture ALL detections - as the PIR sensor could change from a LOW to HIGH and back to LOW state in between a Cayenne state check - and therefore, Cayenne could miss this motion detection.. Therefore we need to assign the PIR sensor to a virtual channel in the following way:
  1. Add New
  2. Device/Widget
  3. Sensors
  4. Motion
  5. Digital Motion Sensor - Motion Detector
  6. Widget Name: PIR sensor
  7. Select Device: Arduino Ethernet
  8. Connectivity: Virtual
  9. Pin: V1
  10. Choose Widget: 2-State Display
  11. Choose Icon: Light
  12. Step2: Add Sensor
  13. Select Settings from the PhotoResistor
  14. Choose Display: Value
  15. Save

 
 
 

Arduino Ethernet - Photoresistor

This sensor will be used with the laser beam to create a laser tripwire. If the sensor detects a change in light levels (drops below the threshold), it will activate the laser trigger button on the dashboard. The person will then be required to identify themselves etc etc (similar to the motion detection by the PIR sensor). The photoresistor widget will display the raw analog reading from the sensor (connected to A2), but is associated with virtual channel 2. I used a virtual channel for more control over this sensor. To add the Photoresistor to the dashboard:

  1. Add New
  2. Device/Widget
  3. Sensors
  4. Luminosity
  5. Photoresistor - Luminosity sensor
  6. Widget Name: PhotoResistor
  7. Select Device: Arduino Ethernet
  8. Connectivity: Virtual
  9. Pin: V2
  10. Choose Widget: Value
  11. Choose Icon: Light
  12. Step2: Add Sensor


 
 
 

Arduino Ethernet - Laser Trigger

The laser trigger is just an indicator that someone tripped the laser beam. The state of this widget is used to notify the Seeeduino that a presence has been detected. This widget is associated with virtual pin 4 on the Arduino UNO with Ethernet.

  1. Add New
  2. Device/Widget
  3. Actuators
  4. Generic
  5. Digital Output - Control a Digital Output
  6. Widget Name: Laser Trigger
  7. Select Device: Arduino Ethernet
  8. Connectivity: Virtual
  9. Pin: V4
  10. Choose Widget: Button
  11. Choose Icon: Lock
  12. Step2: Add Actuator


 
 
 

Arduino Ethernet - Laser Threshold

The laser threshold is used to manually configure the light level at which the laser trigger will trip. When the photoresistor value drops below the threshold value, the laser trigger icon will activate. This allows the threshold value to be updated from the Cayenne dashboard, rather than having to manually adjust the value in the Arduino code. Also, this threshold can be set remotely, in that you don't have to be near the Arduino to change this value. A very useful feature of this Security system. This widget is associated with virtual pin 5 on the Arduino UNO with Ethernet.

  1. Add New
  2. Device/Widget
  3. Actuators
  4. Generic
  5. PWM Output - Control a PWM Output
  6. Widget Name: Laser Threshold
  7. Select Device: Arduino Ethernet
  8. Connectivity: Virtual
  9. Pin: V5
  10. Choose Widget: Slider
  11. Slider Min Value: 0
  12. Slider Max Value: 10
  13. Step2: Add Actuator
The max value of the slider is 10 - due to a current bug in the Cayenne software. Once resolved, this value (as well as the relevant Arduino code) will need to be updated.


 
 
 

Seeeduino Cloud - Presence Detected

The presence detected widget is there to notify the Seeeduino Cloud that a presence has been detected on the Arduino Uno with Ethernet shield. When the PIR sensor detects movement or if the laser tripwire is tripped, Cayenne will change the state of the Presence Detected widget from LOW to HIGH. This is used within the Seeeduino Cloud to trigger the message "Place your keys on the Mat"
. If a valid RFID tag is read by the Grove RFID reader, then this widget's state will change back from HIGH to LOW, and the MasterSwitch will be deactivated - turning the Security system off. This widget is associated with Virtual pin 6 on the Seeeduino Cloud.

  1. Add New
  2. Device/Widget
  3. Actuators
  4. Generic
  5. Digital Output - Control a Digital Output
  6. Widget Name: Presence Detected
  7. Select Device: Seeeduino Cloud
  8. Connectivity: Virtual
  9. Pin: V6
  10. Choose Widget: Button
  11. Choose Icon: Lock
  12. Step2: Add Actuator


 
 
 

Seeeduino Cloud - Intruder Alert

If a valid RFID tag is not read by the Grove RFID reader within 10 seconds of a presence detection event, an alarm will sound, and this widget will be activated. This will trigger a notification event - to notify me of the unauthorised intrusion - via SMS or email. I will also have a visual indicator on the Cayenne dashboard that an intrusion has taken place. This widget is associated with Virtual pin 7 on the Seeeduino Cloud.

  1. Add New
  2. Device/Widget
  3. Actuators
  4. Generic
  5. Digital Output - Control a Digital Output
  6. Widget Name: Laser Trigger
  7. Select Device: Seeeduino Cloud
  8. Connectivity: Virtual
  9. Pin: V7
  10. Choose Widget: Button
  11. Choose Icon: Thermometer
  12. Step2: Add Actuator


 
 
 

Seeeduino Cloud - Laser Beam

The laser beam widget was created to allow for full control over the laser beam. The laser beam can be turned on or off from the Cayenne dashboard, and a connected to digital pin 7 on the Seeeduino Cloud.


  1. Add New
  2. Device/Widget
  3. Actuators
  4. Light
  5. Light Switch - Turn On/Off a Light
  6. Widget Name: xLaser Beam
  7. Select Device: Seeeduino Cloud
  8. Connectivity: Digital
  9. Pin: D7
  10. Choose Widget: Button
  11. Choose Icon: Light
  12. Step2: Add Actuator


 
 
 
 

Cayenne Triggers

Now that all of the widgets have been added to the Dashboard, there is just one more step to complete the Security System. We need to setup the triggers. These triggers provide a level of automation that is easy to create within Cayenne, but would be very complicated otherwise. I set my triggers up as per the table below. Each row represents one of the triggers within my Cayenne dashboard. If you would like to see an example of how to add a trigger - please have a look at the video at the top of this tutorial.  


 
 
 
 
 
 

Concluding comments

I used many different elements to put this home/office security project together - Multiple Arduinos were connected to the internet, both controlled by a web/smart phone app, cross-communication/synchronisation between the Arduinos, and the use of multiple sensors and modules including a laser beam !
 
This was way more than just a simple PIR sense and alarm project. I now have a personalised greeting and reminder system when I walk in the door. Everyone else has their own personalised greeting. I can enable my Security System remotely, from two blocks away, and if I wanted to - I could enable it from the other side of the world. I know instantly when someone has entered my house/office.... with an SMS alert straight to my phone.
 
This project could easily be extended:

  1. Press a button on my phone to manually trigger/play a specific message/sound/song
  2. Take a picture of the intruder
  3. Introduce fire or leak detection aswell
  4. Add other environmental sensors - Temperature / Humidity
  5. Connect it to lamp/light - creating a security light
I am sure you can think of more things I could do with this system. In fact, why don't you mention your ideas in the comments below.
 
Cayenne was instrumental in getting this project to work. I don't think I would know where to start if I had to do this project without this cool IoT platform. I think I will definitely be trying out a few more projects using Cayenne, and should you want to do the same, then please make sure to join Cayenne Beta:
 
Here is the link you need to get to the right place: Cayenne Beta Link

 

If you like this page, please do me a favour and show your appreciation :

 
Visit my ArduinoBasics Google + page.
Follow me on Twitter by looking for ScottC @ArduinoBasics.
I can also be found on Pinterest and Instagram.
Have a look at my videos on my YouTube channel.

             

ScottC 30 Aug 15:42
alarm  arduino  arduinobasics  cayenne  laser  mp3  mydevices  pir  rfid  security  sms  tutorial  

Slap Yourself Awake with This Ridiculous “Wake-Up Machine” Alarm Clock

Swedish tech artist and comedienne Simone Giertz tries her hand at creating the most annoying alarm clock possible

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The post Slap Yourself Awake with This Ridiculous “Wake-Up Machine” Alarm Clock appeared first on Make: DIY Projects, How-Tos, Electronics, Crafts and Ideas for Makers.

A DIY Seizure Alarm based on Arduino Micro

Chad Herbert’s son Daniel was diagnosed with Benign Rolandic Epilepsy in 2014. It’s a type of epilepsy the Epilepsy Foundation says accounts for about 15 percent of all Epilepsies in children and the good news is that most children grow out of it.

The bad news is that Daniel’s most affected by his condition at night or early morning while he sleeps. That’s why Chad invested in a sleep monitor/alarm for his bed that detects when he’s having a full tonic-clonic seizure.

At the same time though, he decided to work on a DIY version of a seizure alarm  running on Arduino Micro. The starting point was Arduino’s “Knock” example project with the sketch code originally created in 2007 by David Cuartielles and modified by Tom Igoe in 2011:

While shopping around for the exact type of monitor/alarm my wife and I wanted, I found out a few things:

  • They are hard to find. I believe the one we ended up with was manufactured by a company in Great Britain.
  • They are expensive. The one we ended up getting cost in the $400-$500 range.
  • The one we have isn’t totally cumbersome, but it’s not easy to pack up and take with you somewhere.

Figuring these things out, I decided to search for a way to build a simple seizure alam that’s both relatively inexpensive and easy to transport. I’m sure there are people out there who have children that suffer from seizures that simply cannot afford equipment such as this even though they truly need it. Thanks to the folks in the Arduino community, I was able to accomplish both things I was setting out to do.

Discover how it was made on his blog.

 

New Project: Build a Motion Sensing Alarm You Can Disable with a Resistor

I designed a DIY motion-sensing alarm that is controlled by a resistor. When an intruder is detected, a siren sounds that can be deactivated by touch.

Read more on MAKE

The post Build a Motion Sensing Alarm You Can Disable with a Resistor appeared first on Make:.

New Project: Build a Motion Sensing Alarm You Can Disable with a Resistor

I designed a DIY motion-sensing alarm that is controlled by a resistor. When an intruder is detected, a siren sounds that can be deactivated by touch.

Read more on MAKE

The post Build a Motion Sensing Alarm You Can Disable with a Resistor appeared first on Make:.

Adding WiFi and SMS to an Alarm System

[Don] wanted to bring his alarm system into the modern age. He figured that making it more connected would do the trick. Specifically, he wanted his alarm system to send him an SMS message whenever the alarm was tripped.

[Don] first had to figure out a way to trigger an event when the alarm sounds. He found a screw terminal that lead to the siren. When the alarm is tripped, this screw terminal outputs 12V to enable the siren. This would be a good place to monitor for an alarm trip.

[Don] is using an Arduino nano to monitor the alarm signal. This meant that the 12V signal needed to be stepped down. He ran it through a resistor and a Zener diode to lower the voltage to something the Arduino can handle. Once the Arduino detects a signal, it uses an ESP8266 WiFi module to send an email. The address [Don] used is the email-to-SMS address which results in a text message hitting his phone over the cell network.

The Arduino also needed power. [Don] found a screw terminal on the alarm system circuit board that provided a regulated 12V output. He ran this to another power regulator board to lower the voltage to a steady 5V. This provides just the amount of juice the Arduino needs to run, and it doesn’t rely on batteries. [Don] provides a good explanation of the system in the video below.


Filed under: Android Hacks, security hacks
Hack a Day 17 Jan 00:01

Arduino-Powered Alarm System Has All The Bells And Whistles

Put aside all of the projects that use an Arduino to blink a few LEDs or drive one servo motor. [IngGaro]‘s latest project uses the full range of features available in this versatile microcontroller and has turned an Arduino Mega into a fully-functional home alarm system.

The alarm can read RFID cards for activation and control of the device. It communicates with the front panel via an I2C bus, and it can control the opening and closing of windows or blinds. There is also an integrated GSM antenna for communicating any emergencies over the cell network. The device also keeps track of temperature and humidity.

The entire system can be controlled via a web interface. The Arduino serves a web page that allows the user full control over the alarm. With all of that, it’s hard to think of any more functionality to get out of this tiny microcontroller, unless you wanted to add a frickin’ laser to REALLY trip up the burglars!


Filed under: security hacks
Hack a Day 03 Sep 06:00

Never Forget to Set an Alarm. Because This Alarm Clock Sets Itself!

Built with the Arduino Yún and using Temboo's online services, the SMART Alarm Clock automatically sets alarms based on Google Calendar events. And if you act quick and design an enclosure for this project you could win a Maker's Notebook!

Read more on MAKE