Posts with «libraries» label

What’s New, ESP-32? Testing the Arduino Library

In case you missed it, the big news is that a minimal Arduino core is up and working on the ESP32. There’s still lots left to do, but the core functionality — GPIO, UART, SPI, I2C, and WiFi — are all up and ready to be tested out. Installing the library is as easy as checking out the code from GitHub into your Arduino install, so that’s exactly what I did.

I then spent a couple days playing around with it. It’s a work in progress, but it’s getting to the point of being useful, and the codebase itself contains some hidden gems. Come on along and take a sneak peek.

The Core

An Arduino isn’t worth very much unless it can talk to the outside world, and making the familiar Arduino commands work with the ESP32’s peripheral hardware is the job of the core firmware. As of this writing, GPIO, WiFi, SPI and I2C were ready to test out. GPIO means basically digitalWrite() and digitalRead() and there’s not much to say — they work. WiFi is very similar to the ESP8266 version, and aside from getting the ESP32 onto our home WiFi network, I didn’t push it hard yet. When other libraries come online that use WiFi, I’ll give it a second look.

SPI

The SPI routines in the ESP32 Arduino port both work just fine. I tested it out by connecting a 25LC256 SPI EEPROM to the chip. The ESP’s extremely flexible hardware peripheral routing matrix allows it to assign the SPI functions to any pins, but the Arduino implementation is preset to a default pinout, so you just need to look it up, and hook up MOSI to MOSI and so on. As of now, it only uses one of the ESP32’s two free SPI units.

With SPI, some of the weirdness of using Arduino on a powerful chip like the ESP32 start to poke through. To set the speed of the SPI peripheral, you can use the familiar SPI_CLOCK_DIV_XX macros, only they’re scaled up to match the ESP32’s faster CPU clock speed. The end result is that SPI_CLOCK_DIV_16 gives you a 1 MHz SPI bus on either the 16 MHz Uno or the 240 MHz ESP32, which is probably what you want for compatibility with old code. But 240 divided by 16 is not 1. In retrospect, the macros would be better defined in terms of the desired frequency rather than the division factor, but you can’t go back in time.

There were also two extra definitions that I had to add to the program to make it run, but they’ve both been streamlined into the mainline in the last eighteen hours. That’s the deal with quickly evolving, openly developed software. One day you write that the macro MSBFIRST isn’t defined, and before you can go to press, it’s defined right there in Arduino.h. Great stuff!

I2C: The Wire

The I2C (“Wire”) library has also gotten the ESP32 treatment, and worked just as it should with an LM75 temperature sensor. This is my standard I2C test device, because it lets you read a few registers by default, but you can also send the sensor a few configuration options and read them back out. It’s not a particularly demanding device, but when it works you know the basics are working. And it did.

The ESP’s dedicated I2C pins are on GPIO 21 and 22 for data and clock respectively. Some I2C implementations will use the microcontroller’s pullup resistors to pull the I2C bus lines high, so I tested that out by pulling the 10 KOhm resistors out. The ESP stopped getting data back instantly, so that answers that. Don’t forget your pullup resistors on the I2C lines and all is well. Otherwise, it’s just connecting up two wires, double-checking the I2C device address, and reading in the data. That was easy.

External Libraries

More than half of the reason to use Arduino is the wide range of external, add-on libraries that make interfacing with all sorts of hardware easy and painless. Many of these libraries are built strictly on top of the Arduino core, and should “just work”. Of course, when you’re actually coding this close to the hardware, nothing is going to be as portable as it is a few layers of abstraction higher up on your desktop computer. Let’s go test this hypothesis out.

El Cheapo IL9341 TFT Display

Uno Lauging at ESP32

Since the SPI library works out of the box, the other various libraries that depend on it should as well, right? Well, kinda. I wasted an afternoon, and still failed. Why? I have a cheapo ILI9341 screen that only works with an old TFTLCD library, rather than with the nice Adafruit_ILI9341 libs. The former is so full of AVR-specific voodoo that it completely fails to compile, and is probably easier to re-write from scratch for the ESP32 than make work in its present form. The Adafruit library compiles fine, because it only depends on the SPI library, but it doesn’t work with my lousy screen.

Going repeatedly back and forth between these two libraries, my LCD experiment ended in tears and frustration: I couldn’t make either of them work. I scoped out the SPI data on a logic analyser, and it looked good, but it wasn’t drawing on the screen. At this point, a full line-by-line protocol analysis would have been needed, and that’s a few days worth of work. If I just wanted a running ILI9341 driver, I would go grab [Sprite_tm]’s NES emulator demo and use the one there, but it’s not Arduinified yet, so it’s out of bounds for the scope of this article.

DHT22 Humidity and Temperature Sensor

The Way It Should Work: Three Wires and Ten Lines of Code

Seeking a quick-and-dirty success, and beaten down by hours of hacking away for naught, I pulled a DHT22 sensor out of the eBay bin, and cloned Adafruit’s DHT library. Of course it didn’t compile straight out of the box, but there were only a couple of things that were wrong, and both turned out to be easily fixable.

ESP32’s Arduino didn’t have a microsecondsToClockCycles() function yet so I commented it out, multiplied by 240 MHz, and left a hard-coded constant in my code. This value was just used for a timeout anyway, so I wasn’t too worried. There are also some timing-critical code sections during which the Adafruit code uses an InterruptLock() function to globally enable and disable interrupts, but these functions weren’t yet implemented, so I just commented it all out and crossed my fingers.

After reassigning the data pin to one of the ESP32’s free ones (GPIO 27, FWIW), it compiled, uploaded, and ran just fine. I now know exactly how hot and humid it is up here in my office, but moreover have had a quick success with an Arduino external library, and my faith is restored.

Lessons from the Libraries

I suspect that these two examples are going to be representative of the ESP32-Arduino experience for a little while. Oddball hardware is going to take some time to get supported. Highly optimized libraries with cycle-correct timings or other microcontroller-architecture specific code in them will need to be ported over as well, despite being “Arduino” code. If you’re a code consumer, you’ll just have to wait while the wizards work their behind-the-scenes magic.

But there will also be a broad group of libraries that are written in a more-or-less device-independent way, and these should be easy enough to get working within fifteen minutes or so, as with the DHT sensor library. If you’re willing to compile, read the errors, and comment out or fix whatever shows up, some codebases will work in short order.

What’s Next? Turning Servos

Given that the Arduino-ESP32 port is brand new, indeed it’s still in progress, there is a lot of work for the community to do in getting it up to speed. Suppose that you need to drive a lot of servos, but the “Servo” library isn’t implemented yet. You’re an impatient coder. What to do? Get hacking!

The good news is that the Arduino-ESP32 libraries themselves are full of hints and examples for getting started. Open up the ESP32-specific directory that you cloned from GitHub. The usual *.cpp files provide the standard Arduino core functionality. The esp32-hal-xxx.h and esp32-hal-xxx.c files are chip-specific, and a tremendous help in taking advantage of the chip’s stranger options. For instance, esp32-hal-matrix.* gives you nice and easy access to the pin-routing matrix, which is a daunting task if you’re starting just from the datasheet.

Spot-On and Jitter-Free

But let’s get back to servos. The ESP32 chip has an intriguing hardware LED PWM peripheral that lets you assign up to sixteen channels to individual LEDS, specify the PWM frequency and bit-depth, and then control them by appropriately setting bits in hardware registers. If you think this would be hard to do by hand, you’d be right. The esp32-hal-ledc.* files provide helper functions to set up the hardware PWM generator, and with these libraries, getting a 16-bit LED fade in straight C or “Arduino” is easy. But our sights are set on servos.

To drive a hobby servo, one needs pulses between 1,000 and 2,000 microseconds each, repeated every twenty milliseconds or so. Setting the repetition rate to 50 Hz takes care of the first part, and each count is 20 ms / 65,635 ticks long, or roughly 0.3 microseconds. Setting the PWM width value to something between 3,300 and 6,500 generates pulses in the right ballpark, and my servo ran jitter-free (and a clean signal was confirmed on the oscilloscope). Here’s all it took:

#include "esp32-hal-ledc.h"
void setup() {
   ledcSetup(1, 50, 16); // channel 1, 50 Hz, 16-bit depth
   ledcAttachPin(22, 1);   // GPIO 22 on channel 1
}

void loop() {
   for (int i=3300 ; i < 6500 ; i=i+100){
    ledcWrite(1, i);       // sweep the servo
    delay(100);
   }
}

That wasn’t so hard, was it? It’s not “Arduino”-style — there’s no objects or classes or methods anywhere in sight — but thanks to a straightforward and well-written hardware abstraction layer, using the very complicated peripherals is made pretty simple. Kudos to [me-no-dev] for his work on the back-end here. The HAL inside the Arduino libraries is currently the best source of code examples on many of the chip’s more esoteric and interesting peripherals.

Conclusion?

The short version of my dive into Arduino-esp32 is that there’s a lot here, even though it’s not done yet. Blinking LEDs and other simple GPIO is a given, and the core communication libraries that are already implemented worked for me: GPIO, WiFi, SPI, and I2C are up and running.

Non-core libraries are hit and miss. I suspect that a lot of them will work with just a little bit of tweaking. Others, especially those that are architecture-dependent, may not be worth the effort to port and will need to be re-written. The ESP32 has a bunch of interesting and innovative hardware peripherals onboard and there’s certainly no Arduino libraries written for them yet, but there’s some great HAL code hidden away in the Arduino-ESP32 codebase that’ll give you a head start. We could get lost in there for hours. Time to get hacking!

The ESP32 is still a new chip, but orders should be coming in soon. Have one? Want to see us put other libraries or languages through their paces? Let us know in the comments.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, Engineering, Featured

3 simple filtering techniques to eliminate noise

Increasing accuracy in the collection of data coming from sensors is a need that, sooner or later, Makers need to face. Paul Martinsen from MegunoLink created a tutorial to eliminate noise from sensor readings on Arduino with three simple filtering techniques.

The Averaging and Running Average techniques are easy to implement as they work by adding a number of measurements together, then dividing the total by the number of measurements. In both cases, the downside is that it can use a lot of memory.

The Exponential filter is a better solution for several reasons: it doesn’t require much memory, you can control how much filtering is applied with a single parameter, and it saves battery power because you don’t need to make many measurements at once. For this solution, they developed an Arduino filter library so you don’t need to go mad with math!

Interested? You can find the tutorial and explore the code on MegunoLing’s blog post here.

Arduino Blog 05 Sep 13:39

Intel releases an improved version of the Arduino 101 core!

A few weeks ago, an announcement was posted on the Arduino Forum mentioning new improvements on the software side of the Arduino/Genuino 101. With this release, the board–which was developed in collaboration with Intel–is reaching its full potential, with not only better code generation but unlocking useful features to make your sketches even more interactive as well.

You can easily upgrade the core using the Arduino IDE’s Board Manager (pictured below), while Arduino Create users will be automatically updated, so no action is required–the cool thing about the cloud!

In more detail:

  • The GCC compiler has been updated to support hardware extensions to the ARC EM core in the Intel® Curie™ module. This provides significant improvements in floating point operations, bit shifting, and other operations to enhance Sketch performance.
  • The Arduino/Genuino 101 platform offers 2MB Flash storage onboard, which is now enabled for user sketches.
  • An experimental driver has been implemented to enable the I2S interface via the CurieI2S library. Connecting the I2S bus to an external DAC (digital to analog converter) allows users to play high-quality music (HiFi).

Other improvements and bug fixes:

  • Motion Sensor: Several sample sketches, like MotionDetection, have been implemented to demonstrate the application of the IMU data
  • Bluetooth LE: Several new examples for BLE peripheral library added
  • IMU: Correct motion detection setting implemented
  • Library CurieTimerOne APIs are now compatible with the TimerOne library

For comprehensive release notes refer to the Intel Open Source Technology Center on GitHub.

Installing Libraries and how to write a Library for Arduino

Libraries are files written in C or C++ which provide sketches with extra functionality, for example the ability to control an LED matrix, read an encoder, connect to a sensor, display, or module, etc. They are very useful to lower the barriers for creating amazing interactive projects and use a wide range of components.  Libraries can be created by everyone and shared with the open source community!

To use an existing library in a sketch you can use the Library Manager (available from IDE version 1.6.2), open the IDE and click to the “Sketch” menu and then Include Library > Manage Libraries and follow the Guide on this page.

 

If you want contribute with a new library for an Arduino or a Genuino board, you are welcome to do so. The best way to start is to learn how to turn a sketch into a library and when you are good at it, learn how to code with basic Arduino principles in mind in order to allow beginners to get started with Arduino easily. Follow the Guidelines at this page, here’s a preview of what you’ve find:

Be kind to the end user. Assume you are writing an API for an intelligent person who has not programmed before. Come up with a clear mental model of the concept you’re working with, and the terms and functions you will use.

Use full, everyday words. Don’t be terse with your function names or variables. Use everyday terms instead of technical ones. Pick terms that correspond to popular perception of the concept at hand. Don’t assume specialized knowledge. For example, this is why we used analogWrite() rather than pwm(). Abbreviations are acceptable, though, if they’re in common use or are the primary name for something.For example, “HTML” is relatively common and “SPI” is effectively the name of that protocol (“serial-peripheral interface” is probably too long). (“Wire” was probably a mistake, as the protocol it uses is typically called “TWI” or “I2C”.)

Avoid words that have different meanings to the general public. For example, to programmers, an error is a notification that something happened. To the general public, errors are bad things.

When you are ready, you can share your new library and documentation on this dedicated area of the Forum.

Arduino Blog 26 Oct 20:29
arduino  featured  forum  genuino  ide  libraries  

Keeping the Arduino website in motion

We never rest, even during summer, to serve our community and we announce today that we’ve refreshed over 150 example pages and redesigned the Examples area, offering an updated support to the current Arduino Software (IDE) Built-in and Libraries examples

Our website is a living entity that everyday hosts a huge number of visitors. They are looking for software, information, guidelines, ideas and also the right tutorial to start tinkering with their new board on a specific issue or project.

The Reference is the place where everything is documented and explained, with dry and essential information that is also included locally with every Arduino Software (IDE) installation.

Our software also includes a number of built-in sketches that help our users to quickly understand how the various functions and libraries may be used and applied to specific projects and tasks. We all started with the famous Blink and at the end of this tutorial we all felt the power and the excitement of having tamed our board with the upload of our first sketch. Keeping all these examples in good shape and updated is essential to keep you users safe from troubles or difficulties.

These examples evolve, as the libraries also evolve, therefore the sketches may be updated, amended or added. Each of these examples is commented and has an introductory part that gives a description of the purpose of the sketch and – if necessary – the instructions to put together the circuit. We know that the information provided inside the IDE and the sketches is not enough and therefore we made an area of our website where each sketch is explained and documented.

Year after year, board after board and library after library, many “hands” contributed to this area, filling gaps and amending things to reflect the Arduino Software (IDE) status. It has been an ongoing process that inevitably brought the Tutorials area in a state where many styles and ways of explaining things merged. We have big plans for our www.arduino.cc website and it is important to clean and fix the existing areas before we add new contents. This is why my first task – as editorial manager – has been the refresh and overall alignment of our Examples and Examples from Libraries pages.

We have roughly 150 pages documenting our Examples for the current products and libraries and going through them all wasn’t exactly a piece of cake: many things were checked for each example and sometimes things were outdated or missing. We also have our sister brand Genuino that got its space in all the relevant example pages. Now contents, style, look and feel and links in this area are ready for new and fresh developments.

I would like to end this post adding that this task was also a very good opportunity to refresh my knowledge about the powerful capabilities of Arduino programming language and its libraries. I had a few doubts on how to do a few things in my own sketches and going through all the examples gave me the hints I was missing.

The plain list of examples available in the Arduino Software (IDE) is just made of the sketch names, conversely in our pages you find a brief description of each of them. I suggest that you wander through these descriptions: let them excite your curiosity and inspire you!

Arduino Blog 11 Sep 10:00

Arduino IDE 1.6.1 released

A new version of the Arduino IDE (1.6.1) is available at the download page!
A month ago we released the version 1.6.0 of the Arduino IDE. We then received lots of feedback: issues on Github, emails on the developers mailing list and, most important, forum messages. We fixed a lot of issues, here is a brief list:

  • Better Yún discovery mechanism (thanks Ron Guest)
  • Better SoftwareSerial library (thanks Matthijs Kooijman)
  • Native dialogs on MacOSX on the Java 7+ experimental version
  • Improved library name matching, so IRemote library won’t conflict with RobotIRremote library (thanks Paul Stoffregen)
  • Fixed bug on Windows when attempting to open a sketch by double clicking it

As usual, the complete list of fixes and credits is available here.

Don’t forget to report any issue you find, either on Github or on the Arduino forum: your help is very much appreciated. It doesn’t matter if you are not a tech specialist: every feedback adds value.

We are already working on release 1.6.2, with some very useful features and user experience improvements. Stay tuned!

Arduino Blog 10 Mar 15:18

APDuino Project – Custom Monitoring without Coding

 

[srejbi] shares a new, programming-free, API-based way to programming Arduino: the APDuino project (minimum hw requirements: Arduino Mega 2560 + W5100 EtherShield). The Apduino relates to a peculiar approach towards Arduino that I noticed in the last years: using Arduino and making things without coding. This is a good thing for people that can’t code, but has to be simpler than learning code itself.

The APDuino Project provides a turn-key software solution for building custom monitoring and automation systems with custom rulesets (featuring expression evaluator with access to sensor and control arrays), cron-like scheduler, remote access and management via HTTP, SD and online logging and more…

All *without* programming (if using supported hardware components) … allowing DIY’ers to build their own automation systems much quicker and easier.

– The image collage attached is showing parts of 1 realization I built (I have 4 completely different systems running, all using the same software ) — This one pictures an aquaponics monitoring system with 16 physical sensors (lots of 1-wire DS18B20′s chained, DHT-11, photoresistors, HY-SRF05 with mechanically inverted reading surface providing tank level monitoring, radio-controlled sockets allow pump and fan controls).

Other systems feature components such as vibration detector, pH probe, BMP085,DS1307 RTC.

via [apduino.org], [Apduino on github]

Arduino Blog 15 Nov 12:42

Drive a DC Motor With Arduino DUE

 

We are proud to show you a tutorial about using an Arduino Motor Shield with the  Arduino Due. This example shows the simplest thing you can do: driving a DC motor forward and backwards.

Read on the [tutorial]

Arduino Blog 31 Oct 18:59

Vertical Plotter Prototype

Nice Grasshopper-to-Arduino plotter hack from FablabTorino maker Pietro Leoni, a collabotator at Carlo Ratti Associati studio in Turin. We’d love to see code & sketches online soon, as much as a second edition of the plotter.

 

Portable and cloud-based heart rate tracker

In his blog, Charalampos describes his experience with SeeedStudio’s Grove Ear-clip Heart Rate sensor and Cosm (former Pachube) cloud service. The employed sensor is quite cheap and can detect heart pulses from the ear lobe, by measuring the infra-red light reflected by the tissue and by checking for intensity variations.

By connecting this sensor with an ADK board and, in turn, with an Android smartphone, Charalampos implemented a portable heart-rate tracker, which is used to send the recorded data to Cosm cloud service.

For more information and sample code, see here.

[Via: Building Internet of Things]