Posts with «iphone» label

Create polarized pictures with your iPhone and Arduino

Taking great pictures means making them more vibrant enhancing saturation and contrast. Ynformatic has published some tips to help you do that by creating a DIY device to control a polarizer using an Arduino Pro Mini, an iPhone, and a screen from an auto-darkening welder’s mask.

A phototransistor located facing the iPhone’s flashlight LED is connected to both an external interrupt pin and an analog pin. Short pulses on the LED cause interrupts in the Arduino code which are used to synchronize the polarizer. Long pulses on the LED cause the Arduino to enter calibration mode. The time interval between syncrhonization pulses is continuously measured and divided into three equal parts. On receiving a synchronization pulse the voltage is set to 0V for one part, to the 45 degree voltage for one part and finally to 5V for one part. Voltage for the polarizer is supplied from an Arduino PWM output pin. To get a reasonably stable output the PWM frequency was increased to 32 kHz and smoothed with a second order RC filter. The liquid crystal display will be damaged by a constant DC voltage so a CMOS switch is used to alternate the polarity. A 2 kHz square wave generated from a free running Arduino timer is used to drive the switching.

An iPhone app written in Swift is responsible for the user interface and image processing.

Explore the schematic in the picture below, while the full source code for the Arduino and iPhone can be downloaded from here.

 

App Control With Ease Using Blynk

App development is not fun for everyone, and sometimes you just want to control a device from your phone with minimal work. Blynk appears to be a fairly put-together library for not only hooking up any Arduino or esp8266 to a phone through WiFi, but also through the net if desired.

Install the app onto your iPhone or Android device. Install the libraries on your computer. Next, modify your Arduino source to either pass direct control of a pin to Blynk, or connect Blynk to a virtual pin inside your code for more advanced control. If you want to go the easy route, create an account, log into the app, and drag and drop the interface you’d like. If the idea of letting some corporation host your Arduino project sends shivers down your spine, there is also an option to host your own server. (Editorial snark: Yes, it requires a server. That’s the cost of “simplicity”.)

There have been a few times where we’ve wished we could add app control to our projects, but installing all the libraries and learning a new language just to see a button on a screen didn’t seem worth it. This is a great solution. Have any of you had experience using it?


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, Cellphone Hacks

1Sheeld Turns your iPhone into a platform of Arduino shields

Have you ever thought of turning your iPhone and iPad into a platform of more than 40 Arduino shields? Now it’s possible!

The team of 1Sheeld have officially released the new 1Sheeld for iOS and it’s available for pre-orders for $39 instead of it’s original price $55 (shipping on May 2016).

You can  control robots, actuators, display sensors’ data and much more.  Take a look at the demo video:

MIT’s Reality Editor Controls IoT Devices via Augmented Reality

Augmented reality has yet to find a foothold in widespread applications, but MIT has just released an AR app that allows you to control IoT devices.

Read more on MAKE

The post MIT’s Reality Editor Controls IoT Devices via Augmented Reality appeared first on Make: DIY Projects, How-Tos, Electronics, Crafts and Ideas for Makers.

New Project: Make an Apple Watch Door Unlocker

Use an Apple Watch to automagically open doors at home or at work with a tap on your wrist.

Read more on MAKE

The post Make an Apple Watch Door Unlocker appeared first on Make: DIY Projects, How-Tos, Electronics, Crafts and Ideas for Makers.

Control an Arduino with Your Smartphone via Blynk

Blynk is a new platform that allows you to build interfaces for controlling and monitoring your projects from your iOS and Android device.

Read more on MAKE

The post Control an Arduino with Your Smartphone via Blynk appeared first on Make: DIY Projects, How-Tos, Electronics, Crafts and Ideas for Makers.

Watch an iPhone sort M&Ms by color

Not everyone has Minecraft-creator Markus "Notch" Persson's money (or candy room) so the rest of us have to devise our own methods of sorting M&Ms by color. The English blogger behind reviewmylife has an idea that combines, among other things, an iPhone 5s, an Arduino and an eBay-sourced 12V 80RPM motor to do the menial task. Oh, and an awful lot of ingenuity, foam-board and hot glue was involved too -- but you kind of figured that already, right? Unlike the Lego-powered contraption we've seen before, this one takes advantage of the Cupertino smartphone lens' color sensor to ID the candy's hue during free-fall after it leaves the hopper. The author has a step-by-step breakdown replete with his or her hardships (apparently finding the right motors and magnets took some experimenting) and photos detailing each part of the process, in case you're curious. Or, because maybe you'd just like to spend Christmas building your own.

Filed under: Cellphones, Apple

Comments

Via: Physorg

Source: reviewmylife

Engadget 24 Dec 07:54
apple  arduino  candy  cellphones  hack  iphone  iphone5s  maker  mms  mobile  

Arduino Plays Timberman or how to cheat in video games

Playing addictive and repetitive video games is a pleasure for some people but not so engaging for others. Valentin Haun found the solution to reach high score without getting bored: he made an Arduino Uno playing Timberman for him.

You can find the code and the circuit example for this program on Github

Take a look at the older and slower version made for iPhone

Arduino Blog 25 Jul 10:55

Arduino RobotVision Facetime


 

[IgorAraujo] has pubblihed another interesting project about robot and Arduino. This time it involves a camera and a bluetooth module.

Appointed to be able to develop a robot communication activity and locomotion guided control with several purposes: conference distance, safety inspection and access to local human presence will unaviable. The intention is to promote environmental inspection, receiving and sending information (image and voice) as well as allow for the visualization of environment and the sensor signals to control the movement of the robot using the Arduino.

As usually, you can find more on his [website] , full post with videos and pictures, thanks for submit again!

Arduino Blog 30 Nov 17:04

Arduino, GPS and Display i2C…

 

En este nuevo tutorial Arduino by ARDUTEKA, estudiamos a fondo los módulos GPS, en concreto los módulos diseñados por LIBELIUM, para aprender a extraer y comprender todas las tramadas de datos que recibimos de los GPS y posteriormente, tratar esa información para mostrar en un display con bus i2C datos como la latitud, longitud, altura y hora UTC…

 

 

[Via: Arduteka]