Posts with «cellphones» label

Control the 'GTA V' cellphone with an iPhone, Arduino and a hack

Grand Theft Auto V has a few mobile apps of its own, but one enterprising modder has taken the idea to its natural conclusion: an application that lets you control the in-game cellphone with an iPhone. With the application you can scroll through text messages on-screen, peep your current list of objectives and, among other things, even control the in-game phone's camera. The YouTube video's description (spotted by former Joystiq'r Dave Hinkle) does't offer much by way of details other than it's running on an Arduino Leonardo with an Ethernet shield connected to a PC, sadly.

Via: Dave Hinkle (Twitter)

Source: DIY Projects Planetleak (YouTube)

Control the 'GTA V' cellphone with an iPhone, Arduino and a hack

Grand Theft Auto V has a few mobile apps of its own, but one enterprising modder has taken the idea to its natural conclusion: an application that lets you control the in-game cellphone with an iPhone. With the application you can scroll through text messages on-screen, peep your current list of objectives and, among other things, even control the in-game phone's camera. The YouTube video's description (spotted by former Joystiq'r Dave Hinkle) does't offer much by way of details other than it's running on an Arduino Leonardo with an Ethernet shield connected to a PC, sadly.

Filed under: Cellphones, Gaming, Home Entertainment, HD, Mobile

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Via: Dave Hinkle (Twitter)

Source: DIY Projects Planetleak (YouTube)

Control the 'GTA V' cellphone with an iPhone, Arduino and a hack

Grand Theft Auto V has a few mobile apps of its own, but one enterprising modder has taken the idea to its natural conclusion: an application that lets you control the in-game cellphone with an iPhone. With the application you can scroll through text messages on-screen, peep your current list of objectives and, among other things, even control the in-game phone's camera. The YouTube video's description (spotted by former Joystiq'r Dave Hinkle) does't offer much by way of details other than it's running on an Arduino Leonardo with an Ethernet shield connected to a PC, sadly.

Filed under: Cellphones, Gaming, Home Entertainment, HD, Mobile

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Via: Dave Hinkle (Twitter)

Source: DIY Projects Planetleak (YouTube)

Tags: Arduino, ArduinoLeonardo, davehinkle, gaming, GrandTheftAuto, gta5, GtaV, hack, hd, hdpostcross, mobilepostcross, pc, PcGaming, RockstarGames, video

Engadget 02 May 00:33

Control the 'GTA V' cellphone with an iPhone, Arduino and a hack

Grand Theft Auto V has a few mobile apps of its own, but one enterprising modder has taken the idea to its natural conclusion: an application that lets you control the in-game cellphone with an iPhone. With the application you can scroll through text messages on-screen, peep your current list of objectives and, among other things, even control the in-game phone's camera. The YouTube video's description (spotted by former Joystiq'r Dave Hinkle) does't offer much by way of details other than it's running on an Arduino Leonardo with an Ethernet shield connected to a PC, sadly.

Filed under: Cellphones, Gaming, Home Entertainment, HD, Mobile

Comments

Via: Dave Hinkle (Twitter)

Source: DIY Projects Planetleak (YouTube)

Tags: Arduino, ArduinoLeonardo, davehinkle, gaming, GrandTheftAuto, gta5, GtaV, hack, hd, hdpostcross, mobilepostcross, pc, PcGaming, RockstarGames, video

Engadget 02 May 00:33

Watch an iPhone sort M&Ms by color

Not everyone has Minecraft-creator Markus "Notch" Persson's money (or candy room) so the rest of us have to devise our own methods of sorting M&Ms by color. The English blogger behind reviewmylife has an idea that combines, among other things, an iPhone 5s, an Arduino and an eBay-sourced 12V 80RPM motor to do the menial task. Oh, and an awful lot of ingenuity, foam-board and hot glue was involved too -- but you kind of figured that already, right? Unlike the Lego-powered contraption we've seen before, this one takes advantage of the Cupertino smartphone lens' color sensor to ID the candy's hue during free-fall after it leaves the hopper. The author has a step-by-step breakdown replete with his or her hardships (apparently finding the right motors and magnets took some experimenting) and photos detailing each part of the process, in case you're curious. Or, because maybe you'd just like to spend Christmas building your own.

Filed under: Cellphones, Apple

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Via: Physorg

Source: reviewmylife

Tags: apple, Arduino, candy, hack, iphone, Iphone5s, maker, mms, mobile

Engadget 24 Dec 07:54
apple  cellphones  

Watch an iPhone sort M&Ms by color

Not everyone has Minecraft-creator Markus "Notch" Persson's money (or candy room) so the rest of us have to devise our own methods of sorting M&Ms by color. The English blogger behind reviewmylife has an idea that combines, among other things, an iPhone 5s, an Arduino and an eBay-sourced 12V 80RPM motor to do the menial task. Oh, and an awful lot of ingenuity, foam-board and hot glue was involved too -- but you kind of figured that already, right? Unlike the Lego-powered contraption we've seen before, this one takes advantage of the Cupertino smartphone lens' color sensor to ID the candy's hue during free-fall after it leaves the hopper. The author has a step-by-step breakdown replete with his or her hardships (apparently finding the right motors and magnets took some experimenting) and photos detailing each part of the process, in case you're curious. Or, because maybe you'd just like to spend Christmas building your own.

Filed under: Cellphones, Apple

Comments

Via: Physorg

Source: reviewmylife

Tags: apple, Arduino, candy, hack, iphone, Iphone5s, maker, mms, mobile

Engadget 24 Dec 07:54
apple  cellphones  

Watch an iPhone sort M&Ms by color

Not everyone has Minecraft-creator Markus "Notch" Persson's money (or candy room) so the rest of us have to devise our own methods of sorting M&Ms by color. The English blogger behind reviewmylife has an idea that combines, among other things, an iPhone 5s, an Arduino and an eBay-sourced 12V 80RPM motor to do the menial task. Oh, and an awful lot of ingenuity, foam-board and hot glue was involved too -- but you kind of figured that already, right? Unlike the Lego-powered contraption we've seen before, this one takes advantage of the Cupertino smartphone lens' color sensor to ID the candy's hue during free-fall after it leaves the hopper. The author has a step-by-step breakdown replete with his or her hardships (apparently finding the right motors and magnets took some experimenting) and photos detailing each part of the process, in case you're curious. Or, because maybe you'd just like to spend Christmas building your own.

Filed under: Cellphones, Apple

Comments

Via: Physorg

Source: reviewmylife

Engadget 24 Dec 07:54
apple  arduino  candy  cellphones  hack  iphone  iphone5s  maker  mms  mobile  

This Arduino hackaphone was never going to be pretty, but it does the job

Okay, we'll admit that it looks a bit like a baby monitor. But in contrast to those over-engineered pieces of parenting paraphernalia, this DIY cellphone can actually make calls and send texts over GPRS. More importantly, Hackaday claims it was put together by a lone hacker ("Victorzie") from an assortment of off-the-shelf and modded parts, including a TFT touchscreen, lithium ion battery, charging circuit, GPRS module and shield. These components were hooked up to an Arduino Uno microcontroller running a barebones UI and then jammed into a 3D printed case, which makes the device look far more pocketable than some previous hackaphone efforts. The end result inspires big respect for the creator, but also, more grudgingly, for the pro engineers at places like Nokia, who can pull all this stuff together and even get it FCC-approved for just a few dollars.

Filed under: Cellphones, Mobile

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Source: Hackaday

New in the Maker Shed: NFC Shield and Tags

You’ve probably heard about NFC but what is it, you ask? NFC (Near Field Communication) is an extension of RFID (Radio Frequency Identification) but with a purposefully decreased range. I know, why would you want LESS range? Mostly for security. You see, it’s common to think that RFID tags need to be right next to a reader before they register. In lots of cases this is true, but you can “shoot” a radio signal at an RFID tag or purchase a long range scanner to read it if from a distance. Since NFC is limited to a maximum of around 4 inches, it’s much more difficult for anyone to get your information without you knowing. This makes it a great technology to use for touch-less payment, door entry, or anywhere else that security is a consideration.

This NFC Shield for Arduino (available in the Maker Shed) is a great way to experiment with NFC and other 13.56MHZ RFID applications. The shield can be used it to not only read tags, but to write them as well. It can even “act” as an NFC tag for bi-directional communication with NFC equipped cell phones and tablets. The NFC Shield uses I2C or SPI for communication to minimize pin usage, and the antenna design improves reception and allows you to stack shields on top of it. The kit includes header pins (a little soldering required) and one writable MiFare 1k 13.56 MHZ NFC card. Since one card isn’t too much fun, we also have an assortment pack of 6 writable, 1KB tags available.


Filed under: Arduino, Cellphones, Maker Shed
MAKE » Arduino 12 Sep 16:00