Posts with «stepper motor» label

Music Box Plays “Still Alive” Thanks to Automated Hole Puncher

Custom hole punch and feed system

Most projects have one or two significant aspects in which custom work or clever execution is showcased, but this Music Box Hole Punching Machine by [Josh Sheldon] and his roommate [Matt] is a delight on many levels. Not only was custom hardware made to automate punching holes in long spools of paper for feeding through a music box, but a software front end to process MIDI files means that in a way, this project is really a MIDI-to-hand-cranked-music-box converter. What a time to be alive.

The hole punch is an entirely custom-made assembly, and as [Josh] observes, making a reliable hole punch turns out to be extremely challenging. Plenty of trial and error was involved, and the project’s documentation as well as an overview video go into plenty of detail. Don’t miss the music box version of “Still Alive”, either. Both are embedded below.

As [Josh] mentioned on his project page, he was inspired by a tutorial video showing how to punch music by hand. It led to this tool to take a MIDI file and cut the music paper out on a laser cutter, whereas [Josh] and [Matt] were inspired to automate the entire process in their own way.

For those of you who don’t think science should stop there, why not automate the creation of the music itself with the output of this Bach-emulating Recurring Neural Network?

Thanks to [Tim Trzepacz] for giving us a heads up on this delightful project!


Filed under: musical hacks

Nextion Enhanced Stepper Motor Piano Project

Introduction

Nextion is a programmable human machine interface (HMI) that can be customized and designed to simplify the interaction between you and your project.

This Nextion Enhanced module (NX4827K043) with a resistive touch screen display, has some additional features not seen in previous traditional versions of the Nextion series.

  • A built in real time clock (RTC)
  • Accessible flash memory (32MB)
  • GPIO functionality
  • Faster clock speed

Before you connect the Nextion Enhanced module to your project, you need to design your interface with the free Nextion Editor. The editor can be downloaded here.

In this project, I will be designing a simple dynamic interface, which will allow me to interact with a stepper motor in two different ways.

The first interface will let me control the direction and speed of the stepper motor through the use of a simple GUI. I will have left and right arrows for the direction, and up and down arrows for the speed. I will also map the Expansion board to this interface for a more tactile experience.

The second interface will be more musical in nature. I will design a functional “Stepper motor piano” that will allow me to play simple songs using the rotational sounds of the stepper motor. This concept is not new, but I will show you how easy it is to make.


 
 
 
 

Project Scope

My project will show a splash screen when the project is powered up. After 3 seconds, the first interface will display.

The first interface will have 4 arrows:

  1. Left and Right arrows for the stepper motor direction of rotation
  2. Up and down arrows to increase/decrease stepper motor rotational speed
  3. Next Page button – to jump to the next interface

Each arrow/button on the first interface will be mapped to a specific button on the expansion board. Eg.

  1. Left/Right arrow is mapped to Left/Right button
  2. Up/Down arrow is mapped to Up/Down button
  3. Next page button is mapped to Enter button on the expansion board

The second interface will look like a piano on the Nextion Enhanced display. Each key on the piano will transmit a specific and unique number to the Arduino.

The specific number received by the Arduino will allow it to set the speed of stepper motor which will ultimately affect the frequency of sound it produces. Therefore when the “C” key is pressed on the Nextion display, the stepper motor will rotate at a frequency that sounds like a “C” note.


The stepper motor speeds can be determined by tuning the motor to specific notes using the first interface and an iPhone app called Tuner T1 Free".

If you plan to replicate this project, you will need to determine the relevant speeds of your own stepper motor, and substitute your values into the Arduino code later on in this tutorial.


 
 

Create a New Project

The first step is to create the interfaces in the Nextion Editor on your PC. You can download the Nextion Editor here.. Load up the Nextion Editor and create a new project.

When you start a new project, you need to make sure that you select the correct Nextion device from the available options.

I am using the “Nextion Enhanced NX4827K043” device.

  1. Select File → New
  2. Select a name for the project and save it to a suitable place on the hard drive
  3. Select the appropriate Nextion device from the available options
    1. My device has a screen size of 480 x 272 pixels


 
 

Project Resources

You need to import all of the resources (eg. pictures and fonts) into your project, and then design the interface to suit your specific needs.

Fonts

I will not be using any fonts in my project, but if you wanted to write any text to the display, you will need to generate a font in the Nextion Editor.

  1. Tools → Font Generator
    1. Select the Height of the Font (eg. 16)
    2. Select the Font code type (eg. iso-8859-2)
    3. Select if you want it to be in Bold or not
    4. Choose the Font you want to use (eg. Arial)
    5. Choose the spacing (eg. 0)
    6. And finally give this Font a unique name (e.g. Arial_16)
    7. Push the “Generate Font” button on the bottom right of the window

Once you press the Generate Font button, it will get you to save the font using a *.zi extension, and will automatically ask you if you would like to “Add the generated font?” to the project. If you are happy with the font, and would like to use this font in your project, then select “Yes”, otherwise select “No” and start again.

You cannot add any text to your project until you have imported or added a font. All of your project fonts will be displayed in the fonts window.

Each font will automatically be indexed, so that you can reference the font programmatically if required. In fact all resources that you add to your project are assigned a number and incremented by one for every resource added. For some resources, you can see this number to the left of the item. E.g. In the picture above, the Courier Font has an index of 0, whereas the Arial font has an index of 1. If you delete a resource, the index number may change for that item.


 

Pictures

As I said before, I will not be using any fonts for my project because the words on the screen will not be changing in any way. I can get away with designing a “Picture” and importing that into the project. I will need 3 pictures for my project.

  1. Splash screen
  2. Stepper Motor Controller
  3. Stepper Motor Piano

On the Nextion Enhanced NX4827K043 device, each picture must be

  • 480 x 272 pixels in size

We will now import the following pictures into the Nextion Editor so that we can use them in the project.

In the bottom left hand corner of the Nextion editor is the “Fonts and Picture” resource window:

  1. Select the Picture tab
  2. Then select the “+” icon
  3. This will open a dialog box to allow you to select the picture(s) to add to the project. You can select more than one picture to import.

I imported the following pictures from my computer:


 
 

Splash Screen


 
 

Interface 1: Stepper Motor Controller


 
 

Interface 2: Stepper Motor Piano


 
 

Creating the GUI

Pages

Every resource will get an ID based on the order it is added, and each resource will automatically get a name. You can change the name of the resource or object, but you cannot edit the ID.

Three pages will be designed to meet the criteria described above.

To add a page, you simply select the “Add” icon from the “page window”. And keep adding pages until you have a total of 3 pages (page0, page1 and page2).


 
 

Page 0 - Splash Screen

When the Nextion is powered up, the splash screen will be displayed for 3 seconds before it shows the Stepper Motor Controller screen. I used the following steps to create the splash screen.

  1. Add the splash screen picture to page0
    1. Select “page0” from the Page window
    2. Select “Picture” from the Toolbox window
    3. Double-click the “pic” attribute from the Attribute window
    4. Select the splash screen image from the list
    5. Press the OK button
  2. Add a Timer to page0
    1. Select Timer from the Toolbox window
    2. Change the “tim” attribute from 400 to 3000 in the Attribute window
    3. Enter “page page1” in the User code section of the Timer Event(0)

This timer event will make the Nextion jump to page1 after 3 seconds.


 
 

Page 1 - Stepper Motor Controller

This page is designed to control the direction and speed of the stepper motor.

There will be two buttons for the direction (Left and Right), and two buttons for the speed (Faster and Slower). And one more button to jump to the next page (i.e. the Stepper Motor Piano page). These buttons will also be mapped to the Nextion expansion board. The tactile buttons of the expansion board will provide an alternative method of controlling the motor.

  1. Add the Stepper Motor Controller picture to page1
    1. Select “page1” from the Page window
    2. Select “Picture” from the Toolbox window
    3. Double-click the “pic” attribute from the Attribute window
    4. Select the “Stepper Motor Controller” image from the list
    5. Press the OK button
  2. Add Hotspots over each button on the Stepper Motor Controller image
    1. Select “Hotspot” from the Toolbox window
    2. Drag and resize the Hotspot so that it covers the “Left” button
      1. This is the area that will respond to “Left button” presses.
      2. It will be transparent when uploaded to the Nextion board
    3. Select the “Touch Press Event” tab in the Event window
    4. Un-Check the “Send Component ID” checkbox
    5. Type the following code into the “User Code” Section of the Event window:
      • print “L”
    6. Change the object name of the hotspot to “Left” using the following process:
      1. Select objname from the attribute window and change the text from “m0” to “Left”
      2. It is not compulsory to change the hotspot object name; however it will help later on.
    7. Repeat steps 2a-2f for each of the other buttons in the following order and as per the table below
      1. Right
      2. Faster
      3. Slower
      4. Next

The decimal ASCII code for the letter “L” is 76, hence when the Nextion Enhanced display sends the letter L to the Arduino using the print “L” command, the Arduino will receive the number 76. When the right button is pressed, it will receive the number 82, and so on.

The “Next” button does not transmit anything to the Arduino, it is simply there to jump to the next interface on the Nextion Enhanced display, hence the reason why the user code is different for that button.

  1. Map the buttons to the Expansion board
    1. Select “page0” and then “page1” from the Page window
    2. Select the “Preinitialize Event” tab from the Event window
    3. Enter the following code into the “User Code” field of the Preinitialize Event tab:
      • cfgpio 5,1,Left
      • cfgpio 2,1,Right
      • cfgpio 4,1,Faster
      • cfgpio 3,1,Slower
      • cfgpio 1,1,Next

Please note: There is one space between cfgpio and the number next to it, but there are no other spaces on each line. If you introduce extra spaces, it will not compile.

This code maps the buttons on the expansion board to the hotspot objects on page1. For example, when the Left button (IO5) on the expansion board is pressed, it simulates the actions or events associated with hotspot m0/Left. In this case it will send a value of “L” (76) to the Arduino.

The IO number is marked within brackets on the expansion board.


 
 

Page 2 - Stepper Motor Piano

This interface will be designed to look like a piano, and will allow me to control the stepper motor such that it produces a note in the same key as the one I press on the Nextion display. The stepper motor will produce the note by rotating at a specific frequency.

  1. Add the Stepper Motor Piano picture to page2
    1. Select “page2” from the Page window
    2. Select “Picture” from the Toolbox window
    3. Double-click the “pic” attribute from the Attribute window
    4. Select the “Stepper Motor Piano” image from the list
    5. Press the OK button
  2. Add Hotspots over each key on the Stepper Motor Piano image
    1. Select “Hotspot” from the Toolbox window
    2. Drag and resize the Hotspot so that it covers the the “A” key.
      1. This is the area that will respond to “A-key” presses.
      2. It will be transparent when uploaded to the Nextion board
    3. Select the “Touch Press Event” tab in the Event window
    4. Type the following into the “User Code” section
      • print 1
    5. Repeat steps 2a-2d for each of the other keys as per the table below

When the specific key is pressed, the Nextion Enhanced board will transmit the printed number, followed by three 0x00 values. The terminating values can be ignored.

  1. The “Back” button will allow me to jump back to the previous interface on the Nextion Enhanced board.
    1. Create a hotspot for the back button using the following process:
      1. Select Hotspot from the Toolbox window
      2. Move/Resize the hotspot over the “Back” button
    2. Select the Event window
    3. Make sure the “Touch press event” tab is selected
    4. Type:   page page1   into the User Code section

 
 

Debugging

The good thing about the Nextion Editor, is that you can test out the interface functionality before uploading it to the board.

  1. Save the project by pressing the save button on the task bar
  2. Then press the compile button
  3. Then press the debug button.

A Nextion emulator window will appear. This window should respond in the same manner as Nextion module after the Nextion file is uploaded to the board. This emulator is a great way to test out your interface and to make sure it looks and works as expected. Once I was happy with the interface(s), I transferred the compiled Nextion file onto an SD card:

  1. Press the compile button
  2. File → Open Build Folder
  3. Select the *.tft file with the same name as that of the project
  4. Copy it to a micro SDHC card
  5. Insert the SDHC card into the SD card slot on the Nextion display
  6. Power up the Nextion board

Wait for the file to flash the Nextion board, and you should see a message that looks like this:

The next step is to power off the Nextion board, and remove the SDHC card.


 
 

ARDUINO SETUP

The Nextion Enhanced display is ready, and now it is the Arduino’s turn. The Arduino is programmed to receive Serial messages from the Nextion Enhanced display and control the stepper motor based on the letters or numbers received. The unique letters or numbers being transmitted from the Nextion board, allow the Arduino to understand what button is being pressed, and it uses those numbers or letters to control the flow of code in order to perform specific stepper motor actions.


 

Arduino Libraries and IDE

The Arduino IDE can be downloaded from this site.

The SoftwareSerial library is used to enable Serial communication between the Arduino and the Nextion Enhanced display.

The AccelStepper library is used to simplify the process of stepper motor control.


 
 

ARDUINO CODE:

Here is the Arduino Code for this project:

I set up a maximum and minimum speed for the motors, and some pre-defined keys. It is possible to “tune” the motor using the first interface of the Nextion display. You can do this by making the motor turn faster or slower until you reach the desired key.

I used the “Tuner T1 Free” app from the iTunes app store to identify WHEN the motor was producing a note in key.

When the motor was producing a specific note, I would write down the stepper motor speed that was printed to the Serial monitor window. Every time the motor speed is increased or decreased, the Arduino code prints the speed to the serial monitor window. I then use these speeds to update the notes[] array in the Arduino code.

The notes[] array holds the stepper motor speeds that correspond to the individual notes on the piano. The Nextion display essentially sends the index number of the note to play from the notes array on the Arduino, thereby simplifying the code required to spin the motor at 16 different speeds.


 
 

Hooking it up:

With all boards powered off, the next step is to make all of the necessary hardware connections to the Arduino. There are two major sections to consider,

  1. The Stepper motor driver and motor
  2. The Nextion Enhanced board

You need to ensure that you use an external power source to power both the stepper motor and the Nextion Enhanced board. The stepper motor driver board itself was powered by the Arduino without any problems, but the actual stepper motor will need an external power supply. The Nextion Enhanced board also needs an external power supply because it requires more current than the Arduino can safely provide.

Here is how you would connect the Arduino to the Stepper motor driver board and associated stepper motor.





 
 

And this is how you would connect the Arduino to the Nextion Enhanced display





 
 

And this is what it looked like when I put it all together:



Make note of the external power supply used. I made sure that I had a large enough power supply to handle the power requirements of the project, and utilized the relevant datasheets to help me identify those requirements. If you plan to replicate this project, make sure you take into consideration the specific power requirements of your motor, your motor driver and your Nextion display. The Arduino can only supply 400mA of current from the 5V pin.

With everything hooked up, I powered up the Nextion display, then powered up the Arduino. The stepper motor starts spinning automatically. I used the first interface to change the direction and/or speed of the motor. Please note the maximum and minimum speeds set up in the Arduino code.

I then used the Next button to jump to the second interface on the Nextion Enhanced display. The second interface looks like a piano. And when I press a key on the piano display, the motor changes speed to match the note I pressed.

Voila !! The stepper motor piano is born !!

I played a number of simple tunes on the Stepper motor piano and was surprised how well it worked. Very clever !!


 
 

Concluding comments

This project is relatively simple, but stepper motors can be tricky to set up and tune. Nothing a bit of determination cannot fix.

This project was a lot of fun. If you plan to replicate this project, I would be interested to see your versions, or just knowing if this helped you in any way.


 


This project would not have been possible without the collaborative efforts of iTead Studio. Their Nextion Enhanced display has a lot more to offer than what I have shown you here. But hopefully this tutorial gives you some insight into the power of such a display, and perhaps how it could improve the project you are currently working on. The only thing I did not like was the power requirements. I would have preferred something within Arduino power supply limits. Nevertheless, I am very happy with the Nextion Enhanced display, and would recommend it to anyone looking for a Human Machine interface to include in their project. You can see how simple it was to create TWO interfaces for my project, and I only scratched the surface.

A Command-Line Stepper Library with All the Frills

When you already know exactly where and how you’d like your motor to behave, a code-compile-flash-run-debug cycle can work just fine. But if you want to play around with a stepper motor, there’s nothing like a live interface. [BrendaEM]’s RDL is a generic stepper motor driver environment that you can flash into an Arduino. RDL talks to your computer or cell phone over serial, and can command a stepper-driver IC to move the motor in three modes: rotary, divisions of a circle, and linear. (Hence the acronumical name.) Best of all, the entire system is interactive. Have a peek at the video below.

The software has quite a range of capabilities. Typing “?” gets you a list of commands, typing “@” tells you where the motor thinks it is, and “h” moves the motor back to its home position. Rotating by turns, degrees, or to a particular position are simple. It can also read from an analog joystick, which will control the rotation speed forward and backward in real time.

Division mode carves the pie up into a number of slices, and the motor spins to these particular locations. Twelve, or sixty, divisions gives you a clock, for instance. Acceleration and deceleration profiles are built in, but tweakable. You can change microstepping on the fly, and tweak many parameters of the drive, and then save all of the results to EEPROM. If you’re playing around with a new motor, and don’t know how quickly it can accelerate, or what speeds it’s capable of, nothing beats playing around with it interactively.

Right now, there’s not much documentation aside from the code itself and the attached video, but actually that looks like all you’d need to get started. So if you’re looking to replicate Hackaday’s [Moritz Walter]’s excellent stepper-driver shootout, a tool like this is just the ticket.


Filed under: misc hacks

Cheap Dual Mirror Laser Projector

[Stanley] wanted to make a laser projector but all he could find online were one’s using expensive galvanometer scanners. So instead he came up with his own solution that is to be admired for its simplicity and its adaptation of what he could find.

At its heart is an Arduino Uno and an Adafruit Motor Shield v2. The green laser is turned on and off by the Arduino through a transistor. But the part that makes this really a fun machine to watch at work are the two stepper motors and two mirrors that reflect the laser in the X and Y directions. The mirrors are rectangles cut from a hard disk platter, which if you’ve ever seen one, is very reflective. The servos tilt the mirrors at high speed, fast enough to make the resulting projection on the wall appear almost a solid shape, depending on the image.

He’s even written a Windows application (in C#) for remotely controlling the projector through bluetooth. From its interface you can select from around sixteen predefined shapes, including a what looks like a cat head, a heart, a person and various geometric objects and line configurations.

There is a sort of curving of the lines wherever the image consists of two lines forming an angle, as if the steppers are having trouble with momentum, but that’s probably to be expected given that they’re steppers controlling relatively large mirrors. Or maybe it’s due to twist in the connection between motor shaft and mirror? Check out the video after the break and let us know what you think.

The video’s in three parts: looking at the laser beams in action as you’d see them on a dance floor, then watching the projected images while looking at an insert of the Windows application, and then watching the steppers and mirror doing their rapid movements.

As for the expensive galvanometer scanners we mentioned above, check out this impressive laser projector that uses them. Another method is to use a spinning wheel with mirrors set to different angles, like this one that draws a marquee using a pill box as the wheel. And how about one with no mirrors at all, instead attaching the laser directly to servo motors, though that one does take longer to draw.

 


Filed under: laser hacks

Litter Basket Automation

Sometimes the technology part of a project isn’t the hard part. It is having an idea for something both useful and doable. Sure, a robot butler that would do your cleaning and laundry would be useful, but might be out of reach for most of us. On the other hand, there’s only so many use cases for another blinking LED.

[Martinhui] knows how to use an ultrasonic sensor with an Arduino. Driving a motor isn’t that hard, either. The question is: what do you do with that? [Martin’s] answer: Automate a trash can. You can see a video of the result, below.

You can find commercial versions of this, of course, but what fun is that? The can is a bit small, but a larger motor or a different mechanical design could scale it up easily.

As robotic trash cans go, this isn’t that ambitious, but it is highly doable. If only it connected to the Internet.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks

Scissors Make Great Automatic Cable Cutters

The team at [2PrintBeta] required a bunch of cables, heat shrink, and braid to be cut for their customers. They looked into an industrial cable cutter, but decided the price was a little too high, so they decided to make their own. They had a bunch of ideas for cutting: Using a razor blade?  Or a Dremel with a cutting wheel? What they came up with was a DIY cable cutter that uses a pair of scissors, a pair of stepper motors, a pair of 3D printed wheels and an Arduino.

The first thing the team had to do was to mount the scissors so they would cut reliably. One of the stepper motors was attached to a drive wheel that had a bolt mounted on it. This went through one of the scissors’ handles, the other handle was held in place on the machine using screws. The second stepper motor was used to rotate the wheels that drives the cable through to the correct length. [2PrintBeta] used a BAM&DICE shield and two DICE-STK stepper motor drivers on an Arduino Mega to control the cutter.

The [2PrintBeta] team are pretty good at doing things themselves, as we’ve seen previously with their DIY plastic bender. And again, with this automatic cable cutter, they’ve seen a need and resolved it using the things at their disposal and some DIY ingenuity.


Filed under: Microcontrollers, tool hacks

Simple Clock is Great Stepper Motor Project

You’d think that we’ve posted every possible clock here at Hackaday. It turns out that we haven’t. But we have seen enough that we’ve started to categorize clock builds in our minds. There are the accuracy clocks which strive to get every microsecond just right, the bizzaro clocks that aim for most unique mechanism, and then there are “hello world” clocks that make a great introduction to building stuff.

Today, we’re looking at a nice “hello world” clock. [electronics for everyone]’s build uses a stepper motor and a large labelled wheel that rotates relative to a fixed pointer. Roll the wheel, and the time changes. It looks tidy, it’s cyclical by design, and it’s a no-stress way to get your feet wet driving stepper motors. And it comes with a video, embedded below.

The clock is driven by the ubiquitous 28BYJ-48 stepper motors that can be found on eBay for a few bucks. They don’t have much torque, but all they have to do here is turn a cardboard disk. It’s the perfect match.

There is one caveat with these motors, though: they don’t have an integral number of steps per turn. If you have the “1:64” geared version, it’s actually geared 8910:567424. The upshot? Instead of 2,048 steps per turn, you need 2,037.8864. Get this wrong and you’re losing 14 minutes per day with a 12-hour wheel.

So between just driving the motors, and the low torque and the non-integral gearing, there’s more to learn here than you’d think. You can add a real-time-clock circuit if you want it precise. With all this room to expand, you can get it built and running in a weekend for a few bucks. And that makes it the perfect “hello world”.


Filed under: clock hacks

Hackaday Prize Entry: Cheap, Open LiDAR

[adam] is a caver, meaning that he likes to explore caves and map their inner structure. This is still commonly done using traditional tools, such as notebooks (the paper ones), tape measure, compasses, and inclinometers. [adam] wanted to upgrade his equipment, but found that industrial LiDAR 3D scanners are quite expensive. His Hackaday Prize entry, the Open LIDAR, is an affordable alternative to the expensive industrial 3D scanning solutions out there.

The 3D scan of a small cave near Louisville from [caver.adam’s] Sketchfab repository
LiDAR — Light Detection And Ranging —  is the technology that senses the distance between a sensor and an object by reflectively measuring the time of flight of a light beam between the two. By acquiring a two-dimensional array of multiple distance readings, this can be used for 3D scanning. Looking at how the industrial LiDAR scanners capture the environment using fast spinning mirrors, [adam] realized that he could basically achieve the same by using a cheap laser range finder strapped to a pan and tilt gimbal.

The gimbal he designed for this task uses stepper motors to aim an SF30-B laser rangefinder. An Arduino controls the movement and lets the eye of the sensor scan an object or an entire environment. By sampling the distance readings returned by the sensor, a point cloud is created which then can be converted into a 3D model. [adam] plans to drive the stepper motors in microstepping mode to increase the resolution of his scanner. We’re looking forwards to see the first renderings of 3D cave maps captured with the Open LIDAR.

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Filed under: The Hackaday Prize

Circuit Bender Artist bends Fresnel Lens for Art

Give some mundane, old gear to an artist with a liking for technology, and he can turn it into a mesmerizing piece of art. [dmitry] created “red, an optic-sound electronic object” which uses simple light sources and optical elements to create an audio-visual performance installation. The project was the result of his collaboration with the Prometheus Special Design Bureau in Kazan, Russia. The inspiration for this project was Crystall, a reconstruction of an earlier project dating back to 1966. The idea behind “red” was to recreate the ideas and concepts from the 60’s ~ 80’s using modern solutions and materials.

The main part of the art installation consists of a ruby red crystal glass and a large piece of flexible Fresnel lens, positioned in front of a bright LED light source. The light source, the crystal and the Fresnel lens all move linearly, constantly changing the optical properties of the system. A pair of servos flexes and distorts the Fresnel lens while another one flips the crystal glass. A lot of recycled materials were used for the actuators – CD-ROM drive, an old scanner mechanism and old electric motors. Its got a Raspberry-Pi running Pure Data and Python scripts, with an Arduino connected to the sensors and actuators. The sensors define the position of various mechanical elements in relation to the range of their movement. There’s a couple of big speakers, which means there’s a beefy amplifier thrown in too. The sounds are correlated to the movement of the various elements, the intensity of the light and probably the color. There’s two mechanical paddle levers hanging in there, if you folks want to hazard some guesses on what they do.

Check out some of [dmitry]’s earlier works which we featured. Here’s him Spinning a Pyrite Record for Art, and making Art from Brainwaves, Antifreeze, and Ferrofluid.


Filed under: hardware, musical hacks

Precision CNC Drawing with EtchABot

Turning the classic toy Etch-A-Sketch into a CNC drawing tablet intrigues a large number of hackers. This version by [GeekMom] certainly takes the award for precision and utility. Once you build something like this, you can hardly stop writing firmware for it; [GeekMom] produced an entire Arduino library of code to allow joystick doodling, drawing web images, and a self-erasing spirograph mode. The topper is the version that runs as a clock!

The major hassle with making a CNC version of this toy is the slop in the drawing mechanism. There is a large amount of backlash when you reverse the drawing direction. If that isn’t bad enough, the backlash is different in the vertical or horizontal directions. Part of [GeekMom’s] presentation is on how to measure and correct for this backlash.

The EtchABot uses three small stepper motors. Two drive the drawing controls and the third flips the device forward to erase the previous drawing. The motors are each controlled by a ULN2003 stepper motor drivers. An Arduino Uno provides the intelligence. Optional components are a DS3231 Real Time Clock and a dual axis X-Y joystick for the clock and doodling capability. Laser cut wood creates a base for holding the Etch-A-Sketch and the electronics.

The write up and details for this project are impressive. Be sure to check out the other entries in [GeekMom’s] blog. Watch the complete spirograph video after the break.



Filed under: Arduino Hacks, toy hacks