Posts with «ar(t)duino» label

Teleknitting: TV-based string art

Have you ever wondered what television would look like if transposed onto string and wrapped around another object? If so, you’re not the only one, as shown in this teleknitting sculpture.

Although it’s hard to say where the idea for this piece came from, Moscow-based artist ::vtol::’s teleknitting installation resolves a TV signal down into one pixel by lowering its resolution in eight steps. This process is displayed as video on an Android tablet, and the results are transferred to thread via a unique dying mechanism involving “dye arms.”

This multi-colored string is then wrapped around an object (or objects) rotating on a pedestal, the height of the string being controlled by the TV signal’s volume.

As you can see below, the character Bender from Futurama along with an alligator bearing an accordion act as the items being wrapped in TV-string. You can find more details of this build on ::vtol::’s website, along with a number of his other Arduino-based interactive projects.

The Orbitalochka is a solar-powered satellite synth

This model satellite is both strange and mesmerizing with folding solar panels and a FM transmitter.

Media artist Dmitry Morozov, aka ::vtol::, is back with his latest kinetic sound object, this one resembling a satellite. The Orbitalochka hangs from the ceiling and broadcasts sound via an FM transmitter and a built-in speaker. These noises are based on the position of the satellite in space, and it can even transmit a pre-recorded lecture by Sergev Kasich, who appears to reside in the satellite’s clear bubble.

::vtol:: bases the sound signals on the generative sound processes created with Patchblocks, a modular mini-synth kit. The signals also react to a light intensity sensor, which responds to how the satellite’s position in space changes.

This happens due to mass redistribution as the solar cell changes location. The solar cells operate as sensors and produce CV (control voltage) to change sound program parameters.

Aside from its unusual sounds, what is really interesting about this synthesizer are the solar panels, which autonomously move around via four servo motors. The Orbitalochka is equipped with an Arduino Nano as well.

You can see the apparatus in action below, and read all about it on ::vtol::’s page here.

(Photos: ::vtol::)

Interactive instrument turns brainwaves into art

Moscow-based hacker artist ::vtol::, a.k.a. Dmitry Morozov, is back with another impressive project. His latest, called 2ch, is an interactive, pyramid-shaped instrument that enables two people to communicate via mind activity.

2ch consists of two NeuroSky EEG interfaces worn by both users, as well as two servo motors with a hall sensor and magnet, a two-channel sound system, a couple screens, and an Arduino. In terms of software, the instrument uses Pure Data and Max/MSP.

As Morozov explains:

The project is an instrument for communication between two people by means of visualising the electroencephalograms of two members, which are translated into sound, mechanical motion, and video images. Two participants should try to synchronize their minds, guided by the pitch of the tone, visualisation and movements of mechanical parts.

You can read more about the brain-to-brain interface on Co.Design, and see how it works below!

Make masterpieces with a homemade CNC painting machine

Longtime artist Jeff Leonard has built a pair of Arduino-driven CNC painting machines with the motivation to grow his toolbox and expand the kinds of marks he could make simply by hand. By pairing the formal elements of painting with modern-day computing, the Brooklyn-based Maker now has the ability to create things that otherwise would’ve never been possible.

Machine #1 consists of a 5’ x 7’ table and is capable of producing pieces of art up to 4’ x 5’ in size. The device features a variety of tools, including a Beugler pinstriping paint wheel, a brush with a peristaltic pump syringe feed, an airbrush with a five-color paint feed system and five peristaltic pumps from Adafruit, a squeegee, and pencils, pens, markers and other utensils.

In terms of hardware, it’s equipped with three NEMA 23 stepper motors, three Big Easy Drivers, as well as an Arduino Mega and an Uno. There are two servos and five peristaltic pumps on the carriage–the first servo raises and lowers the tool, while the second presses the trigger on the airbrush. An Adafruit motor shield on the Uno controls the pumps, and the AccelStepper library is used for the Big Easy Drivers.

According to Leonard:

I am coding directly into the Arduino. There are many different codes that I call and overlap and use as a painter overlaps techniques and ideas. There is a lot of random built into the code, I don’t know what the end result will be when I start. Typically on any kind of CNC machining the end result has been made in the computer and the machine executes the instructions. I am building a kind of visual synthesizer that I can control in real-time. There are many buttons and potentiometers that I am controlling while the routines are running. I take any marks or accidents that happen and learn how to incorporate them into a painting.

I am learning Processing now and how to incorporate it into the image making.

Machine #2, however, is a bit different. This one is actually a standup XY unit that was made as a concept project. It paints using water on magic paper that becomes black when wet and disappears as it dries, used mainly as a way to practice calligraphy or Chinese brush painting. Not only does it look great, there’s no clean up either!

In terms of tools, the machine has a brush and an airbrush. Two NEMA 17 stepper motors are tasked with the XY motion. There are also three servos–one servo lifts and lowers the armature away from the paper since there is no Z-axis, another controls the angle of the brush, and the third presses the trigger of the airbrush. A peristaltic pump helps to refill the water cup, along with a small fan. The system is powered by an Arduino Uno with an Adafruit Motor Shield using the Adafruit Motor Shield Library v2.

As awesome as it all sounds, you really have to see these gadgets in action and their finished works (many of which can be found on Instagram).

Workshop on “Physical and Wearable Computing”: projects and outcomes

Last July 23-27 2012, the workshop on “Physical and Wearable Computing”, organized by SUPSI within the summer school in “Digital Fabrication and Interaction Design”, has took place involving about 20 participants. This workshop has proved to be a very good approach to introduce future makers to the concepts of digital fabrication, prototyping and design of interactive objects.
On the workshop’s homepage, several prototypes and artifacts manufactured during the workshop are presented. Among them, it’s worth to mention Poetry Zoo, a set of laser-cut and RFID-equipped animals that generate poetries, The Sound of a Line, where simple melodies can be performed by using a ball with conductive ink in combination with a special glove, and Superfluo Shoes, a pair of shoes that react based on movement.
The complete list of projects developed during the workshop can be found on its official home page, while a personal view of this experience by Zoe Romano, who has taught at the summer school together with Massimo Banzi, can be found here.

[Via: homepage of the workshop and Zoe Romano's blog]

An Arduino-enhanced espresso machine: the “Naked Espresso”

Reborn is an australian digital creative agency whose mission is to design smart and innovative ideas.
Among their works, a very nice one regards a hack consisting in the re-engineering of a sofisticated espresso machine, to show its peculiar features in the process of coffee making.
By means of an Arduino board, the team can collect real-time information such as flow rate, temperature and pressure; then, a Processing sketch graphically presents this data to the user in an artistic fashion.
Finally, each cup of coffee made this way is decorated with an artwork summarizing this information in its own “personal identity”.
More information can be found here.

[Via: The Naked Espresso]

Variations II Of Variations II

Variations II of Variations II is a kinetic sculpture inspired by John Cage’s Variations series.

Cage’s Variations II is a graphical composition that generates musical events using measurements of distance between dots and lines on a piece of paper.

The instructions for the piece determine the behavior of rotating panels and images synchronized to be projected onto the sculpture. Motors drive the rotation of the panels, and are used as a sound source for the audio portion of this piece.

 

The artist Jay Kim has used C/C++,  Arduino,  MaxMSP/Jitter and some stepper motor to create his sculpture.

Watch the video.

Via:[Synthopia]

 

Toccata for ultra-conservative book organ

In an article on the New York Times Nick Bilton report us an impressive sentence pronounced by Paola Antonelli, senior curator in the Department of Architecture and Design at the Museum of Modern Art.  She said: “The two most important introductions for art  in the past 20 years have been the Arduino and Processing”.

Not all art projects we come across have precisely the characteristics of avant-garde art, but many are able to attract our attention and at least snatch us a smile.

That’s the case of  “Crush Limbaugh”.

 

The ultra-conservative book organ includes the autobiography of Sarah Palin, a thriller by Glenn Beck, the memoirs of Dan Quayle and a book-length rant by Rush Limbaugh, each repurposed into electronic triggers hooked up to a central Arduino microcontroller. The Arduino is programmed with a music-generating algorithm, and each hit of a book triggers a single note, or some other type of instruction within the program. Toccata for ultra-conservative book organ (“Crush Limbaugh”) is the name of both the program which generates the music and the interactive, semi-improvisational performance on this instrument.

The performers are Sangbong Nam, Charles Peck, and Benjamin Martinson.

 

 

Journalism #2 Typewriter: generative stories about killed journalists

“On Journalism #2 Typewriter” is a typewriter installation of Julian Koschwitz, which purpouse is to remember journalists who got killed in the past 20 years. The installation writes generative stories about all journalist who have been killed worldwide between 1992 and today based on the existing data on their life as well as their published work. The individual stories are connected through common fields of coverage, places, professions and the story is written endlessly on one endless piece of paper.Besides the text the typewriter creates flags which are distorted the more journalists got killed in that particular country.
The installation makes use of Arduino Nano, Arduino and Processing software, 32 solenoids and shift-registers.

For more information: http://koschwitz.org/studio/?page_id=627

Missed the Maker Faire? Catch the pictures!

Missed the maker-faire? No worries! Catch awesome pictures and works of Arduino, Ana Araujo, Ella Smith, Greg Klein, William Martin and likes right here.

What interested you the most? Do write to us, we would love to hear!

Via:[patch.com]

Arduino Blog 26 May 19:34