Posts with «atmega328» label

Hard Drive Clock is Simple and Elegant

[Aaron] has been wanting to build his own binary desk clock for a while now. This was his first clock project, so he decided to keep it simple and have it simply display the time. No alarms, bells, or whistles.

The electronics are relatively simple. [Aaron] decided to use on of the ATMega328 chips he had lying around that already had the Arduino boot loader burned into them. He first built his own Arduino board on a breadboard and then re-built it on a piece of protoboard as a more permanent solution. The Arduino gets the time from a real-time clock (RTC) module and then displays it using an array of blue and green LED’s. The whole thing is powered using a spare 9V wall wort power supply.

[Aaron] chose to use the DS1307 RTC module to keep time. This will ensure that the time is kept accurately over along period of time. The RTC module has its own built-in battery, which means that if [Aaron's] clock should ever lose power the clock will still remember the time. The RTC battery can theoretically last for up to ten years.

[Aaron] got creative for his clock enclosure, upcycling an old hard drive. All of the hard drive guts were removed and replaced with his own electronics. The front cover had 13 holes drilled out for the LED’s. There are six green LED’s to display the hour, and seven blue LED’s for the minute. The LED’s were wired up as common cathode. Since the hard drive cover is conductive, [Aaron] covered both sides of his circuit board with electrical tape and hot glue to prevent any short circuits. The end result is an elegant binary clock that any geek would be proud of.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks

HackEDA hits Kickstarter, makes Arduino board design a drag-and-drop affair (video)

Writing code for an Arduino-friendly board is relatively easy; creating the board is the hard part, unless you live and breathe electrical engineering. If HackEDA has its way, however, the design process could be almost as easy as window shopping. Its new Kickstarter-backed project lets tinkerers choose from a list of parts and get a made-to-order board without knowing a lick about PCB assembly -- algorithms sort out the finer details. While the initial effort includes just 36 combos based around an Atmega328 processor, contributors who want tangible hardware can pay anything from $30 for a bare board through to $10,000 for the first stages of mass production. The truly committed will have to wait until December for the finished goods, but those willing to try HackEDA can use its existing web tool for free.

Filed under: Misc

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Source: Kickstarter, HackEDA

Engadget 20 Jun 13:00

Pocket Serial Host acts as an Apple II disk drive

[Osgeld] is showing off what he calls a sanity check. It’s the first non-breadboard version of his Pocket Serial Host. He’s been working on the project as a way to simplify getting programs onto the Apple II he has on his “retro bench”. When plugged in, the computer sees it as a disk drive.

The storage is provided by an SD card which is hidden on the underside of that protoboard. This makes it dead simple to hack away at your programs using a modern computer, then transfer them over to the retro hardware. The components used (starting at the far side of the board) are a DB9 serial connector next to a level converter to make it talk to the ATmega328 chip being pointed at with a tool. The chip below that is a level converter to get the microcontroller talking to the RTC chip seen to the right. The battery keeps that clock running when there’s no power from the 5V and 3.3V regulators mounted in the upper right.

The video after the break shows off this prototype, the breadboard circuit, and a demonstration with the Apple II.

[Thanks Brendan]


Filed under: classic hacks, computer hacks

Engine start button with fingerprint and remote webasto control

Engine start button with fingerprint and remote webasto control with original key from factory. Board based on the ATmega328, it controls engine start function, climate control, battery voltage, coolant fluid temperature, and so on. Fingerprint scanner BIOCODE Auto M10.

Arduino based Cybot

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What does it do?

Navigate around via ultrasound but will eventually do more

I recently recieved lots of Cybot parts from my friend who collected the parts of eBay, no longer wanting them he kindly gave them to me, my plan was to convert it to an Arduino based robot.

If you are not aware what a Cybot looks like here is a picture I took before the dismantling process:

The Cybot had some good features; line following, IR remote control, speech recognition and even the ability to find its IR ball and shoot goals into an IR goal.

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12 hours

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wheels

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Obstacle avoidance robot (made from drift car)

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What does it do?

Navigate around via ultrasound

Hello again everybody my name is chickenparmi, and I like robots.

Today I would like to show you my obstacle avoidance bot, with a difference. The difference with this bot is that it has been build onto an RC drift car, meaning it goes very fast and is very dangerous.

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Ebay-bot (my version of the start here robot)

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What does it do?

Avoid obstacles

This is my version of the "start here" robot. For me this was a programming exercise. I had written an obstacle avoiding sketch for my Rover 5. It worked but I was never really happy with it. Most code that I've seen online uses lots of delays in the code. Some time ago I swore to myself to never use the delay function in void loop ever again. There are various reasons for it, once you start writing more advanced code the delay function can cause lots of trouble. I also use a library (RF24network) in another project where I can not use the delay function.

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$50,00

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MechBass robot nails bass guitar sounds with Arduino and a stone cold groove (video)

End-of-year engineering school projects often pique our interest for their creativity. It's not every day that they can carry a bassline, however. James McVay's robot project for his honors year at the Victoria University of Wellington, the supremely well-named MechBass, wouldn't have much trouble keeping up with a favorite band. It centers on a custom, Arduino-compatible board that controls the plucking, fretting and damping of four strings to faithfully recreate bass guitar sounds from MIDI input. The design even accounts for the unwanted noises of actuators and motors, while virtually everything was either 3D-printed or laser-cut just for the task at hand. Sounds good? There's more in the pipeline: an upcoming Swivel robot will experiment with different playing techniques, and McVay ultimately sees his work teaching us about robotic music's interaction with human performers. For now, we'll be happy with the video after the break and hope that MechBass takes requests.

Continue reading MechBass robot nails bass guitar sounds with Arduino and a stone cold groove (video)

Filed under: Robots, Alt

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Source: Hack A Day

Light Seeking Car (Moth Car)

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What does it do?

Navigate around according to ambient light

Let me introduce you to my Moth Car! The Moth Car is made from the chassis of an old RC car I found out in the shed. Forgotten and deteriorating away I decided to give it a new life.

I carefully de-soldered the wires from the battery pack and DC motors and kept the receiver for another day. Using the Adafruit motor shield for the Arduino Uno I connected the cables. Making sure that everything was connected properly and operational I uploaded some test code and thankfully it all worked.

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Nebulophone microcontroller synthesizer project sounds great

Judging from the video (found after the break) the Nebulophone is one of the best sounding DIY synthesizers we’ve seen. Especially when you consider the simplicity of the hardware design. It uses an AVR chip and an OpAmp. The rest of the parts are just a few handfuls of inexpensive components.

The device was developed by Bleep Labs, and they sell the synthesizer kit seen on the left. But since it’s an open source project you can follow their design to fabricate your own, which is what [BlinkyBlinky] did with his offering seen to the right.

An ATmega328 drives the device, which is the chip often used in the Arduino Duemilanove. The keyboard is a set of traces hooked to the microcontroller. These are tinned pads on the kit PCB, but the DIY version simply uses some adhesive copper foil with a jumper wire soldered to it. The keys are played with a probe that makes the electrical connection, a common practice on these stylophone type designs. Chances are you have everything on hand to make this happen so keep it in mind for that next cold winter weekend that’s making everyone a bit stir crazy.

[Thanks Wybren]


Filed under: arduino hacks, musical hacks