Posts with «atmega328» label

Arduino Robot with coil gun / gauss gun drone

Primary image

What does it do?

Arduino robot with coilgun

12V-220V inverter, 2*680uF capacitors, coil, laser sight, 2servo, 4mm projectile

If YOU want more info please write in comments.

www.youtube.com/embed/4z0Dn_AkVM0

www.youtube.com/embed/BeFJ_vmmldg

Cost to build

$150,00

Embedded video

Finished project

Complete

Number

Time to build

Type

URL to more information

Weight

1600 grams

Roboter Board

Mich hat es manchmal genervt, dass sobald ich einen neuen Roboter bauen möchte oder einfach nur mal auf die Schnelle was ausprobieren möchte, muss ein Arduino UND ein Motor Shield her und so wird man schnell 50€ los. Ok, Arduino ist nicht das einzige Board auf dieser Welt, aber irgendwie habe ich mich damit ziemlich gut anfreunden können :) Den ganzen Schnick-Schnack auf den Arduino Boards brauche ich ja auch nicht wirklich. Stattdessen brauche ich anderen Schnick-Schnack :D

Weiterlesen

Let's Make Robots 16 Jan 19:06
arduino  atmega328  l293d  

Homemade Arduino board not in sync with Arduino IDE

Hi,

I flashed a blank Atmega328 chip with an AVR dragon lended.

That chip was running nicely on the breadboad it had been flashed on.

I could program it with arduino IDE, through a uno board without it's chip.

Then I built a small board for that chip.

The program (blinking LED) is working properly, but I can't reprogram it with arduino IDE anymore.

I got the message :

"avrdude: stk500_getsync(): not in sync: resp=0x00"

 

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Furbies Sing Queen at Fresher’s Faire

The University of Kent has their own hacker space, called  [Maker Society]. Every year the school holds an orientation for new students called the Fresher’s Faire. The [Maker Society] display at this year’s Fresher’s Faire included a group of partially clothed Furbies singing the classic Bohemian Rhapsody by Queen. This isn’t our first run in with Bohemian Rhapsody and hacked hardware.

The [Maker Society] started by doing some internet research and reverse engineering a first generation Furby.  The Furby itself is a marvel of cost reduction. All the doll’s functions run from a single motor and a cam system. A limit switch tells the on-board microcontroller when the cam is at the zero position. An optical encoder keeps track of the cam as it moves. The [Society] replaced Furby’s internal microcontroller with an Atmel ATMega328. This allowed them to use the Arduino programming environment.

Many classic Animatronic systems use an audio recording for motion. Typically a stereo recorder would perform double duty. The first track would contain the audio for the animation. A second track would contain audio tones corresponding to movement of each of the degrees of freedom of the doll being animated. Because the two tracks were on the same strip of magnetic tape, the audio and movement would always be in sync. Multitrack tape record and playback systems added even more flexibility to this type of system.

The [Maker Society] used a computerized twist on this classic system for their Furbies. A set of positions and times were stored in Comma Separated Variable (CSV) format. A java program would play the song and read the file, dispatching the movement commands to the Furbies at their appointed times. The result is quite nice. Unfortunately the Faire was so loud that we can’t hear too much of the Furbies’ singing.


Filed under: misc hacks

HackEDA hits Kickstarter, makes Arduino board design a drag-and-drop affair (video)

Writing code for an Arduino-friendly board is relatively easy; creating the board is the hard part, unless you live and breathe electrical engineering. If HackEDA has its way, however, the design process could be almost as easy as window shopping. Its new Kickstarter-backed project lets tinkerers choose from a list of parts and get a made-to-order board without knowing a lick about PCB assembly -- algorithms sort out the finer details. While the initial effort includes just 36 combos based around an Atmega328 processor, contributors who want tangible hardware can pay anything from $30 for a bare board through to $10,000 for the first stages of mass production. The truly committed will have to wait until December for the finished goods, but those willing to try HackEDA can use its existing web tool for free.

Filed under: Misc

Comments

Source: Kickstarter, HackEDA

Engadget 20 Jun 13:00

HackEDA hits Kickstarter, makes Arduino board design a drag-and-drop affair (video)

Writing code for an Arduino-friendly board is relatively easy; creating the board is the hard part, unless you live and breathe electrical engineering. If HackEDA has its way, however, the design process could be almost as easy as window shopping. Its new Kickstarter-backed project lets tinkerers choose from a list of parts and get a made-to-order board without knowing a lick about PCB assembly -- algorithms sort out the finer details. While the initial effort includes just 36 combos based around an Atmega328 processor, contributors who want tangible hardware can pay anything from $30 for a bare board through to $10,000 for the first stages of mass production. The truly committed will have to wait until December for the finished goods, but those willing to try HackEDA can use its existing web tool for free.

Filed under: Misc

Comments

Source: Kickstarter, HackEDA

Engadget 20 Jun 13:00

Pocket Serial Host acts as an Apple II disk drive

[Osgeld] is showing off what he calls a sanity check. It’s the first non-breadboard version of his Pocket Serial Host. He’s been working on the project as a way to simplify getting programs onto the Apple II he has on his “retro bench”. When plugged in, the computer sees it as a disk drive.

The storage is provided by an SD card which is hidden on the underside of that protoboard. This makes it dead simple to hack away at your programs using a modern computer, then transfer them over to the retro hardware. The components used (starting at the far side of the board) are a DB9 serial connector next to a level converter to make it talk to the ATmega328 chip being pointed at with a tool. The chip below that is a level converter to get the microcontroller talking to the RTC chip seen to the right. The battery keeps that clock running when there’s no power from the 5V and 3.3V regulators mounted in the upper right.

The video after the break shows off this prototype, the breadboard circuit, and a demonstration with the Apple II.

[Thanks Brendan]


Filed under: classic hacks, computer hacks

Engine start button with fingerprint and remote webasto control

Engine start button with fingerprint and remote webasto control with original key from factory. Board based on the ATmega328, it controls engine start function, climate control, battery voltage, coolant fluid temperature, and so on. Fingerprint scanner BIOCODE Auto M10.

Arduino based Cybot

Primary image

What does it do?

Navigate around via ultrasound but will eventually do more

I recently recieved lots of Cybot parts from my friend who collected the parts of eBay, no longer wanting them he kindly gave them to me, my plan was to convert it to an Arduino based robot.

If you are not aware what a Cybot looks like here is a picture I took before the dismantling process:

The Cybot had some good features; line following, IR remote control, speech recognition and even the ability to find its IR ball and shoot goals into an IR goal.

Cost to build

Embedded video

Finished project

Number

Time to build

12 hours

Type

wheels

URL to more information

Weight

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Obstacle avoidance robot (made from drift car)

Primary image

What does it do?

Navigate around via ultrasound

Hello again everybody my name is chickenparmi, and I like robots.

Today I would like to show you my obstacle avoidance bot, with a difference. The difference with this bot is that it has been build onto an RC drift car, meaning it goes very fast and is very dangerous.

Cost to build

Embedded video

Finished project

Complete

Number

Time to build

Type

URL to more information

Weight

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