Posts with «c++» label

Demystifying The ESP8266 With A Series Of Tutorials

If your interest has been piqued by the inexpensive wireless-enabled goodness of the ESP8266 microcontroller, but you have been intimidated by the slightly Wild-West nature of the ecosystem that surrounds it, help is at hand. [Alexander] is creating a series of ESP8266 tutorials designed to demystify the component and lead even the most timid would-be developer to a successful first piece of code.

If you cast your mind back to 2014 when the ESP8266 first emerged, it caused great excitement but had almost no information surrounding it. You could buy it on a selection of modules, but there were no English instructions and no tools to speak of. A community of software and hardware hackers set to work, resulting in a variety of routes into development including the required add-ons to use the ever-popular Arduino framework. Four years later we have a mature and reliable platform, with a selection of higher-quality and well supported boards to choose from alongside that original selection.

The tutorials cover the Arduino and the ESP, as well as Lua and the official SDK. They are written for a complete newcomer, but the style is accessible enough that anyone requiring a quick intro to each platform should be able to gain something.

Our community never ceases to amaze us with the quality of the work that emerges from it. We’ve seen plenty of very high quality projects over the years, and it’s especially pleasing to see someone such as [Alexander] giving something back in this way. We look forward to future installments in this series, and you should keep an eye out for them.

Hack a Day 26 Aug 18:01

Arduino and Pidgin C++

What do you program the Arduino in? C? Actually, the Arduino’s byzantine build processes uses C++. All the features you get from the normal libraries are actually C++ classes. The problem is many people write C and ignore the C++ features other than using object already made for them. Just like traders often used pidgin English as a simplified language to talk to non-English speakers, many Arduino coders use pidgin C++ to effectively code C in a C++ environment. [Bert Hubert] has a two-part post that isn’t about the Arduino in particular, but is about moving from C to a more modern C++.

Even those of us who use C++ often use what we think of as “classic” C++. More or less the C++ that started life as a preprocessor in front of the C compiler. C++ has changed a lot since then, though. [Bert] looks mostly at useful features from the C++ 2014 standard which is widely available in compilers now. He only talks a little about some 2017 features. He doesn’t, however, talk about super new features or very specialized features that probably won’t be your first stop in a transition from C.

In particular, [Bert] doesn’t cover multiple inheritance, template metaprogramming, a big chunk of iostreams, C++ locales, user-defined literals, or exotics. Just to motivate you, he shows an example where calling the C library to sort a large array is slower than the code using C++ templates that take advantage of parallelism. While this is a special case, it does show that C++ isn’t just “another way to write the same thing.” You could write a faster sort in C, but you’d be writing a lot of code, not just pulling in a library.

What he does cover is strings, namespaces, classes, smart pointers, threads and error handling. Some of these will be more useful on the Arduino than others, but if you are writing for other platforms like a PC or a Raspberry Pi you could use all of them. He’s planning on adding more items in future installments of the series.

Meanwhile, we had our own story about modern C++ and the Arduino last year. If you want to know more about templates, we’ve talked about that, too.

New automatic parachute system, for a water rocket

Primary image

What does it do?

Detects rocket launch, apogee and descend to open a parachute

Hello!

After the previous successful but heavy automatic parachute system*

*(If you didn't see the previous article please visit it here, as it has all the explanations about the electronics and way of working. All improvements are based on that one)

Cost to build

$100, 00

Embedded video

Finished project

Number

Time to build

20 hours

Type

URL to more information

Weight

500 grams

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GO-4 SMART HOME ARDUINO BOT

Primary image

What does it do?

IOT Robot

In this project I will

Cost to build

$50, 00

Embedded video

Finished project

Number

Time to build

24 hours

Type

URL to more information

Weight

150 grams

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Arduino Sumo Robot

Primary image

What does it do?

sumo robot

 

Before we start

What is the sumo robot?

It is a self-control robots with specific dimensions and features, it is also designed in a Hostile shape which qualify it to participate in the contests and competitions with other robots.

Cost to build

Embedded video

Finished project

Number

Time to build

Type

URL to more information

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Fire Fighting Robot

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What does it do?

Navigate a Maze, extinguish a flame, track position

I'm currently a sophomore at Worcester Polytechnic Institute studying Robotics Engineering. The third course in the series, RBE 2002, focusing on sensors. In a group of 4 students, we built a robot that could autonomously navigate a maze, locate a flame, put it out and report its X,Y, and Z position relative to its starting position. The robot was required to use an IMU and a flame sensor provided to us. All other sensors and parts are up to the group to use to complete the challenge.

Cost to build

Embedded video

Finished project

Complete

Number

Time to build

Type

URL to more information

Weight

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Fire Fighting Robot

Primary image

What does it do?

Navigate a Maze, extinguish a flame, track position

I'm currently a sophomore at Worcester Polytechnic Institute studying Robotics Engineering. The third course in the series, RBE 2002, focusing on sensors. In a group of 4 students, we built a robot that could autonomously navigate a maze, locate a flame, put it out and report its X,Y, and Z position relative to its starting position. The robot was required to use an IMU and a flame sensor provided to us. All other sensors and parts are up to the group to use to complete the challenge.

Cost to build

Embedded video

Finished project

Complete

Number

Time to build

Type

URL to more information

Weight

read more

Tertiarm - low cost, 3d printed robot arm based on Ikea lamp

Primary image

What does it do?

Move things, push buttons, etc.

Cost to build

Embedded video

Finished project

Complete

Number

Time to build

Type

URL to more information

Weight

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Let's Make Robots 07 Feb 15:54

Tertiarm - low cost, 3d printed robot arm based on Ikea lamp

Primary image

What does it do?

Move things, push buttons, etc.

Cost to build

Embedded video

Finished project

Complete

Number

Time to build

Type

URL to more information

Weight

read more

Let's Make Robots 07 Feb 15:54

Tertiarm - low cost, 3d printed robot arm based on Ikea lamp

Primary image

What does it do?

Move things, push buttons, etc.

Cost to build

Embedded video

Finished project

Complete

Number

Time to build

Type

URL to more information

Weight

read more

Let's Make Robots 07 Feb 15:54