Posts with «c++» label

Fire Fighting Robot

Primary image

What does it do?

Navigate a Maze, extinguish a flame, track position

I'm currently a sophomore at Worcester Polytechnic Institute studying Robotics Engineering. The third course in the series, RBE 2002, focusing on sensors. In a group of 4 students, we built a robot that could autonomously navigate a maze, locate a flame, put it out and report its X,Y, and Z position relative to its starting position. The robot was required to use an IMU and a flame sensor provided to us. All other sensors and parts are up to the group to use to complete the challenge.

Cost to build

Embedded video

Finished project

Complete

Number

Time to build

Type

URL to more information

Weight

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Fire Fighting Robot

Primary image

What does it do?

Navigate a Maze, extinguish a flame, track position

I'm currently a sophomore at Worcester Polytechnic Institute studying Robotics Engineering. The third course in the series, RBE 2002, focusing on sensors. In a group of 4 students, we built a robot that could autonomously navigate a maze, locate a flame, put it out and report its X,Y, and Z position relative to its starting position. The robot was required to use an IMU and a flame sensor provided to us. All other sensors and parts are up to the group to use to complete the challenge.

Cost to build

Embedded video

Finished project

Complete

Number

Time to build

Type

URL to more information

Weight

read more

Tertiarm - low cost, 3d printed robot arm based on Ikea lamp

Primary image

What does it do?

Move things, push buttons, etc.

Cost to build

Embedded video

Finished project

Complete

Number

Time to build

Type

URL to more information

Weight

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Let's Make Robots 07 Feb 15:54

Tertiarm - low cost, 3d printed robot arm based on Ikea lamp

Primary image

What does it do?

Move things, push buttons, etc.

Cost to build

Embedded video

Finished project

Complete

Number

Time to build

Type

URL to more information

Weight

read more

Let's Make Robots 07 Feb 15:54

Tertiarm - low cost, 3d printed robot arm based on Ikea lamp

Primary image

What does it do?

Move things, push buttons, etc.

Cost to build

Embedded video

Finished project

Complete

Number

Time to build

Type

URL to more information

Weight

read more

Let's Make Robots 07 Feb 15:54

WALTER - The Arduino Photovore Insect Robot

Primary image

What does it do?

Navigate around and seeking light

[Please excuse my English]

Cost to build

Embedded video

Finished project

Complete

Number

Time to build

Type

URL to more information

Weight

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WALTER - The Arduino Photovore Insect Robot

Primary image

What does it do?

Navigate around and seeking light

[Please excuse my English]

Cost to build

Embedded video

Finished project

Complete

Number

Time to build

Type

URL to more information

Weight

read more

WALTER - The Arduino Photovore Insect Robot

Primary image

What does it do?

Navigate around and seeking light

[Please excuse my English]

Cost to build

Embedded video

Finished project

Complete

Number

Time to build

Type

URL to more information

Weight

read more

WALTER - The Arduino Photovore Insect Robot

Primary image

What does it do?

Navigate around and seeking light

[Please excuse my English]

Cost to build

Embedded video

Finished project

Complete

Number

Time to build

Type

URL to more information

Weight

read more

Simple Clock from Tiny Chip

If you haven’t jumped on the ESP8266 bandwagon yet, it might be a good time to get started. If you can program an Arduino you have pretty much all of the skills you’ll need to get an ESP8266 up and running. And, if you need a good idea for a project to build with one of these WiFi miracle chips, look no further than [Ben Buxton]’s dated, but awesome, NTP clock.

While the ESP8266 started out as an inexpensive, reliable way to get WiFi capability on essentially anything (and paving the way for a plethora of Internet of Things projects), it was quickly hacked to become a fully programmable development board that can stand on its own. To that end, [Ben] has recognized its capability to run a very minimalistic NTP clock. The standard C++/Arduino environment is available, so he didn’t have to learn any new skills. The parts list is stripped down as well: besides the ESP8266, there’s little more than the four-part seven-segment display. There’s even an Arudino library for these chips that [Ben] made great use of. From there, it’s just a matter of wiring it all up and syncing it with an NTP server.

While it’s not the most involved hack ever, it’s good to be reminded that these chips are cheap and readily available for literally anything that you could imagine. If you haven’t started yet, there’s no reason not to. You can use them to control something like an irrigation system, or if you’re even more adventurous, they can run a 3D printer, too.

Thanks [Itay] for the tip!


Filed under: clock hacks
Hack a Day 11 Sep 15:00