Posts with «sd card» label

Chest of Drawers Stores Audio Memories

Some people collect stamps, some collect barbed wire, and some people even collect little bits of silicon and plastic. But the charmingly named [videoschmideo] collects memories, mostly of his travels around the world with his wife. Trinkets and treasures are easy to keep track of, but he found that storing the audio clips he collects a bit more challenging. Until he built this audio memory chest, that is.

Granted, you might not be a collector of something as intangible as audio files, and even if you are, it seems like Google Drive or Dropbox might be the more sensible place to store them. But the sensible way isn’t always the best way, and we really like this idea. Starting with what looks like an old card catalog file — hands up if you’ve ever greedily eyed a defunct card catalog in a library and wondered if it would fit in your shop for parts storage — [videoschmideo] outfitted 16 drawers with sensors to detect when they’re opened. Two of the drawers were replaced by speaker grilles, and an SD card stores all the audio files. When a drawer is opened, a random clip from that memory is played while you look through the seashells, postcards, and what-have-yous. Extra points for using an old-school typewriter for the drawer labels, and for using old card catalog cards for the playlists.

This is a simple idea, but a powerful one, and we really like the execution here. This one manages to simultaneous put us in the mood for some world travel and a trip to a real library.


Filed under: misc hacks
Hack a Day 18 Sep 12:00

Pocket Serial Host acts as an Apple II disk drive

[Osgeld] is showing off what he calls a sanity check. It’s the first non-breadboard version of his Pocket Serial Host. He’s been working on the project as a way to simplify getting programs onto the Apple II he has on his “retro bench”. When plugged in, the computer sees it as a disk drive.

The storage is provided by an SD card which is hidden on the underside of that protoboard. This makes it dead simple to hack away at your programs using a modern computer, then transfer them over to the retro hardware. The components used (starting at the far side of the board) are a DB9 serial connector next to a level converter to make it talk to the ATmega328 chip being pointed at with a tool. The chip below that is a level converter to get the microcontroller talking to the RTC chip seen to the right. The battery keeps that clock running when there’s no power from the 5V and 3.3V regulators mounted in the upper right.

The video after the break shows off this prototype, the breadboard circuit, and a demonstration with the Apple II.

[Thanks Brendan]


Filed under: classic hacks, computer hacks

Tracking Solar Brightness with a Homemade Sun Logger

The Sun Logger, a data logging device, combines several components we’ve used in previous Weekend Projects. You may recognize the light-sensitive photoresistor (Optical Tremolo Box) and the Arduino Uno microcontroller (Touchless 3D Tracking Interface). These parts, when combined with a 74AHC125 Level Shifter and SD card socket mounted on a homemade “shield,” will record the levels of light shining down on your project box. That data, recorded every 15 seconds to the SD card, can be exported later to any popular spreadsheet software and graphed, giving you a visual representation of light changes over time. This data could aid in knowing where best to plant a garden, or simply to understand changes of light intensity throughout the seasons in your micro-climate.

And while this project is readymade for recording levels of sunlight, the Arduino has a total of six analog inputs (labeled A0 – A5) and could easily record other variables. For example temperature, motion, or barometric pressure. Makers looking for a mid-level Arduino build, or knowledgeable coders looking to solder together their first homemade shield, the Sun Logger is a great project to build!


Filed under: Arduino, MAKE Projects, Weekend Projects

I2SDv3 - Arduino buckler with microSD

The Wyolum machine (these are the people who generously offered $3000 in innovation grants, with no strings attached) is forging ahead with a new and improved version of I2SD.
I just received their v3 prototype and it looks impressive. I must say it is the most feature-rich data logger / SD card backpack (here is the list of the competing products that I compared with).

Like its predecessor, I2SD v3 is a software-compatible Arduino (ATmega328/16MHz) with extras. It has on-board microSD card, DS3231 extremely accurate real-time-clock with backup battery, infrared receiver and 2 LED indicators for errors or status.





























I2SDv3 comes assembled (all SMD), with the bootloader burnt in. Sketches can be uploaded through the FTDI connector.

The board can be plugged directly into Arduino, using one row of headers (A0-A4-GND-RST), hence the name "buckler" (like a "semi-shield", got it?)
I2SDv3 also offers header access to D4-D7 (v2 lacked that; my complaint was heard :), and it is compatible with the ChronoDot headers.

To test it, I decided to try the OpenLog library, by Nathan Seidle of Sparkfun. Surprisingly, it worked without a glitch from the first try. Well, kind of, I had to read the documentation :), and to change HardwareSerial.cpp, a "system file" (function SIGNAL(USART_RX_vect) is redefined in OpenLog.pde).

To emulate the OpenLog board closer, I changed the code to use D2 for the status LED, as shown:

from
#define STAT1  5 //On PORTD
int statled1 = 5;  //This is the normal status LED

to
#define STAT1  2 //On PORTD
int statled1 = 2;  // status LED on I2SDv3;

Note: The second LED of OpenLog board is connected to SCK (D13), so it blinks when the SD card is active (while reading or writing). The second LED on I2SDv3, being on D3, cannot be easily re-purposed.

Following OpenLog documentation, I connected to I2SDv3 using CoolTerm, typed in some text, pressed CtrlZ three times and voila!: file LOG0001.TXT got created and it contained the characters I typed in. Cool indeed.

Note: OpenLog won't compile with Arduino 1.0 IDE without some minor changes, as follows:
1. "WProgram.h" replaced everywhere with "Arduino.h"
2. function SdFile::write(uint8_t) must return size_t now (since it is virtual function defined in Stream.h); both SdFile.cpp and SdFat.h will need to be updated to reflect that.

Reminder: The OpenLog library should work with FAT32-formatted SD cards as well as FAT16. I will test it as soon as I get a 4GB microSD card.

Wise time with Arduino 21 Jan 00:25
i2c  sd card  

I2SDv3 - Arduino buckler with microSD

The Wyolum machine (these are the people who generously offered $3000 in innovation grants, with no strings attached) is forging ahead with a new and improved version of I2SD.
I just received their v3 prototype and it looks impressive. I must say it is the most feature-rich data logger / SD card backpack (here is the list of the competing products that I compared with).

Like its predecessor, I2SD v3 is a software-compatible Arduino (ATmega328/16MHz) with extras. It has on-board microSD card, DS3231 extremely accurate real-time-clock with backup battery, infrared receiver and 2 LED indicators for errors or status.





























I2SDv3 comes assembled (all SMD), with the bootloader burnt in. Sketches can be uploaded through the FTDI connector.

The board can be plugged directly into Arduino, using one row of headers (A0-A4-GND-RST), hence the name "buckler" (like a "semi-shield", got it?)
I2SDv3 also offers header access to D4-D7 (v2 lacked that; my complaint was heard :), and it is compatible with the ChronoDot headers.

To test it, I decided to try the OpenLog library, by Nathan Seidle of Sparkfun. Surprisingly, it worked without a glitch from the first try. Well, kind of, I had to read the documentation :), and to change HardwareSerial.cpp, a "system file" (function SIGNAL(USART_RX_vect) is redefined in OpenLog.pde).

To emulate the OpenLog board closer, I changed the code to use D2 for the status LED, as shown:

from
#define STAT1  5 //On PORTD
int statled1 = 5;  //This is the normal status LED

to
#define STAT1  2 //On PORTD
int statled1 = 2;  // status LED on I2SDv3;

Note: The second LED of OpenLog board is connected to SCK (D13), so it blinks when the SD card is active (while reading or writing). The second LED on I2SDv3, being on D3, cannot be easily re-purposed.

Following OpenLog documentation, I connected to I2SDv3 using CoolTerm, typed in some text, pressed CtrlZ three times and voila!: file LOG0001.TXT got created and it contained the characters I typed in. Cool indeed.

Note: OpenLog won't compile with Arduino 1.0 IDE without some minor changes, as follows:
1. "WProgram.h" replaced everywhere with "Arduino.h"
2. function SdFile::write(uint8_t) must return size_t now (since it is virtual function defined in Stream.h); both SdFile.cpp and SdFat.h will need to be updated to reflect that.

Reminder: The OpenLog library should work with FAT32-formatted SD cards as well as FAT16. I will test it as soon as I get a 4GB microSD card.


Wise time with Arduino 21 Jan 00:25
i2c  sd card