Posts with «charging» label

Open Source Electric Vehicle Charging

Electric vehicles are becoming more and more common on the road, but when they’re parked in the driveway or garage there are still some kinks to work out when getting them charged up. Sure, there are plenty of charging stations on the market, but they all have different features, capabilities, and even ports, so to really make sure that full control is maintained over charging a car’s batteries it might be necessary to reach into the parts bin and pull out a trusty Arduino.

This project comes to us from [Sebastian] who needed this level of control over charging his Leaf, and who also has the skills to implement it from the large high voltage switching contactors to the software running its network connectivity and web app. This charging station has every available feature, too. It can tell the car to charge at different rates, and can restrict it to charging at different times (if energy is cheaper at night, for example). It is able to monitor the car’s charge state and other information over the communications bus to the vehicle, and even has a front-end web app for monitoring and controlling the device.

The project is based around an Arduino Nano 33 IoT with all of the code available on the project’s GitHub page. While we would advise using extreme caution when dealing with mains voltage and when interfacing with a high-ticket item like an EV, at first blush the build looks like it has crossed all its Ts and might even make a good prototype for a production unit in the future. If you don’t need all of the features that this charging station has, though, you can always hack the car itself to add some more advanced charging features.

Programmable Lithium Charger Shield for Arduino

Surely you need yet another way to charge your lithium batteries—perhaps you can sate your desperation with this programmable multi (or single) cell lithium charger shield for the Arduino<! Okay, so you’re not><em>hurting</em> for another method of juicing up your batteries. If you’re a regular around these parts of the interwebs, you’ll recall the <a href="http://hackaday.com/2014/09/21/a-li-ion-battery-charging-guide/">lithium charging guide</a> and that <a href="http://hackaday.com/2014/09/05/an-obsessively-thorough-battery-and-more-showdown/">rather incredible, near-encyclopedic rundown of both batteries and chargers</a>, which likely kept your charging needs under control.</p> <p>That said, this shield by Electro-Labs might be the perfect transition for the die-hard-’duino fanatic looking to migrate to tougher projects. The build features an LCD and four-button interface to fiddle with settings, and is based around an LT1510 constant current/constant voltage charger IC. You can find the schematic, bill of materials, code, and PCB design on the Electro-Labs webpage, as well as a brief rundown explaining how the circuit works. Still want to add on the design? Throw in <a href="http://hackaday.com/2014/07/16/finally-an-easy-to-make-holder-for-lithium-ion-batteries/">one of these Li-ion holders</a> for quick battery swapping action.</p> <p>[via <a href="http://embedded-lab.com/blog/?p=9644">Embedded Lab</a>]</p><br />Filed under: <a href="http://hackaday.com/category/arduino-hacks/">Arduino Hacks</a>, <a href="http://hackaday.com/category/microcontrollers/">Microcontrollers</a> <a><img src="http://feeds.wordpress.com/1.0/comments/hackadaycom.wordpress.com/138748/" /></a> <img src="http://pixel.wp.com/b.gif?host=hackaday.com&blog=4779443&post=138748&subd=hackadaycom&ref=&feed=1" />

Autonomous robot that returns to charging station when battery runs low

Primary image

What does it do?

Drive around until battery runs low, then it will look for the charging station to get some juice

 

 

Cost to build

$250,00

Embedded video

Finished project

Complete

Number

Time to build

600 hours

Type

URL to more information

Weight

1000 grams

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