Posts with «household» label

ICYMI: Becoming Thor, the future of beekeeping and more

Today on In Case You Missed It: The FlowHive is a new bee colony rig that allows beekeepers to tap the honey easily by cranking open the honeycomb design, creating a channel down to the spout. Japanese inventors created a throwable robot that flies through the air as a sphere, then unfurls four legs to scuttle its way onward. And maker Alan Phan re-created the God Hammer aka Mjolnir aka Thor's cool hammer-- with an Arduino-controlled fingerprint scanner and a super-charged electromagnet.

ICYMI: Becoming Thor, the future of beekeeping and more

Today on In Case You Missed It: The FlowHive is a new bee colony rig that allows beekeepers to tap the honey easily by cranking open the honeycomb design, creating a channel down to the spout. Japanese inventors created a throwable robot that flies through the air as a sphere, then unfurls four legs to scuttle its way onward. And maker Alan Phan re-created the God Hammer aka Mjolnir aka Thor's cool hammer-- with an Arduino-controlled fingerprint scanner and a super-charged electromagnet.

Build your own robotic bartender with Arduino and a 3D printer

You can certainly buy a ready-made drink mixing robot if you're flush with cash, but wouldn't you rather spend that money on the drinks themselves? Yu Jiang Tham thinks so -- he recently designed Bar Mixvah, a robotic bartender you can build yourself with $180 in parts. The key ingredient is an Arduino Nano microcontroller that takes your requests through a web-based interface. After that, it's mostly a matter of 3D printing the frame and wiring up the pumps that will make your beverage a reality.

Filed under: Household, Robots

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Source: Yu Jiang Tham

Engadget 27 May 16:23

Build your own robotic bartender with Arduino and a 3D printer

You can certainly buy a ready-made drink mixing robot if you're flush with cash, but wouldn't you rather spend that money on the drinks themselves? Yu Jiang Tham thinks so -- he recently designed Bar Mixvah, a robotic bartender you can build yourself with $180 in parts. The key ingredient is an Arduino Nano microcontroller that takes your requests through a web-based interface. After that, it's mostly a matter of 3D printing the frame and wiring up the pumps that will make your beverage a reality.

Filed under: Household, Robots

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Source: Yu Jiang Tham

Tags: arduino, arduinonano, barmixvah, bartender, diy, drink, drinks, homebrew, household, robot, video, yujiangtham

Engadget 27 May 16:23
household  robots  

LittleBits' Arduino module puts the focus on programming, not wiring

Getting your feet wet with programmable hardware can be tricky; even if you're comfortable with coding, you may not want to break out the soldering iron just to build a usable device. LittleBits is aware of just how intimidating these make-it-yourself gadgets can be, so it has just launched its first software-programmable module, the Arduino at Heart. As the name implies, it's an Arduino core (the same as the Leonardo) designed to fit into LittleBits' simple, building block approach to circuit boards. If you want to attach a light, motor or sensor to the Arduino board, you just snap it on -- you can spend more of your time coding rather than dealing with wiring and other hardware hassles. %Gallery-slideshow193425%

Filed under: Household, Peripherals

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Source: LittleBits

Kegbot makes creating an Android-controlled kegerator easy

The idea of a connected kegerator isn't anything new. We've seen quite a few startups build high-tech kegs -- even Google has gotten in on the action. Those projects, however, require quite a bit of technical know-how. Now there's an easier solution for the beer enthusiasts: Kegbot. Kegbot is a bit different simply because it handles most of the geeky stuff for you. To get the device up and running, you just have to connect a flow sensor to your keg's line, and connect the pre-made board to your favorite Android tablet. With a minimal amount of effort, the device can track how much beer is left in your keg, who's drinking it and what days of the week you're consuming the most booze.

Creators Mike Wakerly and Eric Webb have been at the smart keg game for a while. The two originally sold Kegbot as a do-it-yourself open-source project. They realized there was a market for a little easier option, and developed the plug-and-play version they're currently raising money for on Kickstarter. We recently met up with the team to see the device in action. %Gallery-slideshow164837%

Filed under: Household, Wireless, Alt

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Engadget 18 Feb 22:45

This smart handbag could stop you from overspending

If you're the sort who overspends at the mall, you may need a firm reminder to watch your budget. How does an ever-vigilant handbag sound? Finder.com.au could soon make one: meet the iBag, a prototype carryall that locks you out if it believes you're going to splurge. The Arduino-powered bag automatically shuts tight at those times you're most likely to shop. Outside of those moments, it uses GPS to warn you when you get too close to favorite stores; ignore the alert and it will both record when you take out your wallet as well as send a text message to a trusted partner. iBag is primarily a publicity stunt meant to highlight the dangers of credit card debt, but it might become a reality. The site is asking potential customers to register their interest, and it may sell both men's and women's versions of the bag for $199 AUD ($173 US) if there's enough demand.

Filed under: GPS, Household

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Source: Finder.com.au

Engadget 30 Jan 09:07

MIT gets musical with Arduino-powered DrumTop, uses household objects as a source of sound

Everyone's favorite microcontroller has been a boon among hobbyists and advanced amateurs, but it's also found a home among the brilliant projects at MIT's Media Lab, including a groovy instrument called DrumTop. This modern take on the drum pad delivers Arduino-powered interactivity in its simplest form -- hands-on time with ordinary household objects. Simply place a cup, or a plastic ball, even a business card on the DrumTop to make your own original music.

The prototype on display today includes eight pads, which are effectively repurposed speakers that tap objects placed on top, with an FSR sensor recognizing physical pressure and turning it into a synchronized beat. There's also a dial in the center that allows you to speed up or slow down the taps, presenting an adjustable tempo. DrumTop is more education tool than DJ beat machine, serving to teach youngsters about the physical properties of household objects, be it a coffee mug, a CD jewel case or a camera battery. But frankly, it's a lot of fun for folks of every age. There's no word on when you might be able to take one home, so for now you'll need to join us on our MIT visit for a closer look. We make music with all of these objects and more in the video after the break.

Continue reading MIT gets musical with Arduino-powered DrumTop, uses household objects as a source of sound

MIT gets musical with Arduino-powered DrumTop, uses household objects as a source of sound originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 24 Apr 2012 12:35:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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