Posts with «nano» label

Automate motor winding with Arduino

When you want to make a mobile robot, DC motors can be a great choice. We normally accept that they can be purchased for a few dollars each, but what if you want to make your own?

In order to assist with the winding process for a self-built—or at least self-wound—motor, Mr. Innovative created an… innovative fixture with two stepper motors and an Arduino Nano for control. 

The bare motor armature is held in a vertical orientation by one stepper, while the other winds wire using a hollow 3D-printed feeder mechanism. User interface consists of an OLED screen and buttons that let you select the number of windings and another to advance the armature to the next coil location. 

Arduino code and electrical drawings can be found here, and 3D-printed parts are available on Thingiverse.

Ping pong ball bounces forever under Arduino control

As spotted on Reddit, maker “tkuhn” of Electron Dust decided to make a machine “with the sole goal of keeping a ping pong ball bouncing for as long as possible.” 

To accomplish this, he turned to audio feedback using the time difference between when four electret microphones sense the sound of the bouncing ball. Audio processing is accomplished with the help of a simple flip-flop circuit, while an Arduino Nano is used to reset it after each cycle.

Data is then passed along to an Arduino Uno, which employs four steppers motors/drivers and a linkage system to keep the ball in play. This impressive setup can be seen in the video below, and code is available on GitHub.

Arduino Blog 25 Jul 16:11
arduino  featured  nano  uno  

“Magical” fountain bends time under Arduino control

Years ago, engineer and photographer Harold “Doc” Edgerton figured out how to “bend time” by pulsing a strobe light at the nearly the same speed as droplets of water, making them appear to move in slow motion, freeze, or even more backwards. Today, Nick Lim of jolliFactory has created the same effect, controlled by an Arduino Nano.

His excellent build is outlined here, including a surprisingly simple circuit that controls the pump, solenoid valve, and LED illumination via a trio of MOSFETs. 

One simply places the fountain over a water supply, which pumps it up into the solenoid valve, allowing 45 drops to fall per second. The lights then strobe at this speed—or slightly faster or slower—producing the time-bending display shown in the video below.

Arduino Blog 16 Jul 20:21

Audio preamplifier with tiny OLED display and unique case

As spotted here, Sam Izdat decided to make a preamplifier for a friend who provides voice talent for audiobooks and the like. The primary audio circuitry for the build is provided by a purchased PCB based on the INA217 chip from TI, but from there things get a bit more interesting.

To complete the project, Izdat added a tiny Arduino-powered OLED display. This shows a VU meter, along with a variety of other animations, seen through a window in the enclosure made from a broken wristwatch. 

The device was prototyped using an Arduino Uno, while a Nano was embedded in the final product, allowing everything to fit into the unique compartmentalized enclosure that he constructed.

The amplifier is based on the Texas Instruments INA217 chip, with an Arduino Nano and 128×64 OLED display providing the visualization. [Sam] was able to find a bare PCB for a typical INA217 implementation on eBay for a few bucks (see what we mean?), which helped get him started and allowed him to spend more time on the software side of things. His visualization code offers a number of interesting display modes, uses Fast Hartley Transforms, and very nearly maxes out the Arduino.

Tell time on a three-module voltmeter clock

Father’s Day 2018 has come and gone, but it’s never too early to start planning for next year. As seen here, Michael Teeuw decided to build a clock out of three analog voltmeters for his dad in 2017. After getting sidetracked last year, he was finally able to complete it on time for 2018!

Teeuw’s clock features a trio of indicators, properly scaled and labeled for hours, minutes, and seconds, with control via an Arduino Nano, along with an RTC module for accurate timekeeping. Each indicator is housed in its own 3D-printed module, with white LEDs added for visibility. 

If you’d like to build your own, Teeuw’s code is available on GitHub and the 3D print files can be found on Thingiverse.

Track the sun with this Arduino-based solar panel

Solar panels are a great way to produce power literally out of thin air, but how much power they produce depends, in part, on how they are aimed. In order to figure out just how much better his solar setup could be with active tracking, YouTuber GreatScott! decided to test this by creating a miniature solar tracking system.

His device uses four LDRs to feed position data to an Arduino Nano, which then moves the small panel to properly face the sun.

The tracker/panel was set up next to a non-moving panel lying flat on his roof, and after a 2 ½-hour test, he found that the moving configuration generated 15% more energy. Of course there are other factors to consider, including time of day and how much power the tracker itself consumes, so be sure to see the experimental project and his thoughts on the results below.

Nature and Arduinos combine as binary driftwood alarm clock

Binary clocks, which use a series of dots to indicate the time, are nothing new, but you’ve never seen anything like this device by Matt Wos! 

Wos’ project features a beautiful driftwood base, and WS2812B RGB LED dots that are suspended above it with copper wire to show the time.

Inside are a pair of Arduino Nanos used to control the LEDs and take input from a small infrared remote, along with an RTC module that allows it to keep accurate time. When the alarm function goes off, you’re treated not to a normal buzzer, but the “soothing” tones of a dial-up modem via an MP3 module and speaker!

Binary clocks have always attracted my attention and here is my version. There are a number of design elements that I believe sets it apart from other variants described on Instructables and other internet sites:

  • Addressable RGB LEDs have been mounted on a copper frame that is external to the body that houses the electronics.
  • An IR remote is used to set the time / alarm, snooze the alarm, select a display colour.
  • The alarm tone is able to be easily personalised.
  • Its in a piece of driftwood!!

The use of the external frame to support the LEDs was due to how much I liked the completed look of the display. The original plan was to have it mounted inside a box, behind opaque perspex but this would have been a design crime!

Bucky Glow is an Arduino-controlled LED dodecahedron

After successfully building a gigantic geometric interactive light structure, Jonathan Bumstead decided to do things in a more approachable manner, creating a more a reasonably-sized dodecahedron controlled by an Arduino Nano. The device, named “Bucky Glow,” uses 11 RGB LEDs to light up each side with the exception of the bottom pentagon section.

While it doesn’t have its own light, the base does have a few interesting tricks of its own, with both an opening for programming the Arduino, along with female headers that allow you to access 11 of its I/O pins. This means that you can hook up your own sensors to create your own interactive contraption without designing everything from scratch, and an app interface is even available if you’d like to forgo programming, at least initially.

The Bucky Glow is an interactive LED dodecahedron consisting of 11 LEDs, which are controlled with an Arduino Nano. Using the Arduino programming environment, you can create endless light-up patterns. The Bucky Glow also includes break-out header pins, so you have access to eleven digital I/O pins, a TX (transmit) pin, a RX (receive) pin, reset pin, and ground pin. These pins enable you to connect the Bucky Glow to sensors (e.g. capacitive touch, infrared, ultrasonic), motors, MIDI jacks, and any other electronics you can think of. There are tons of unique ways to make the Bucky Glow musical and interactive.

More info on the Bucky Glow can be found in Bumstead’s write-up here, and kits are on sale via the demo video’s description.

This Arduino-controlled robot slithers like a snake

Would you like to create a robot that slithers from place to place like a snake? Well now you can, thanks to this bio-inspired design from Will Donaldson. 

Donaldson’s project uses 10 metal gear servos to allow his robotic snake to curl its body back and forth, sliding along on small wheels that replace a real serpent’s bottom scales. An Arduino Nano controls its 10 segments, and power is provided by an external tether from a recycled desktop power supply. 

As shown in Donaldson’s video, he’s been experimenting with several different snake builds and forms of locomotion. These include an inchworm-style gait where sections are picked up off of the ground, and a sort of hybrid configuration where a snake can move in both the horizontal and vertical planes. 

Instructions and code can be found in Donaldson’s write-up here, and you can check out the video below to see more about his design process.

DoggoBot is an Arduino-controlled cardboard robotic pet

While building a walking robot especially with less than six legs can be quite a challenge, maker “Skill Mill NYC” decided to construct a quadruped robot named DoggoBot using cardboard for its body.

Four micro high torque servos power the legs, which are able to move the robot around with the help of unpowered knee joints.

DoggoBot is controlled by an Arduino, and it takes movement commands via a computer USB-serial connection or from a Bluetooth module. 

Ever since I started programming Arduinos, I wanted to build a robot using one. I also want a dog. However, living in NYC makes it tough to take care of a dog. So after hours of watching videos of robots and dogs, I decided to put my phone down and build myself a pet!

Although what’s seen in the demonstration below is an impressive feat of “cardboard engineering,” its creator has a few more ideas for it, such as adding sensors and getting Doggo’ to turn.