Posts with «web» label

Webmote: control anything with web-based remote

We’ve seen a lot of projects that let you control all of your devices from a smartphone. But this universal web-based remote control system looks like the most versatile we’ve seen yet. The project is called Webmote as the controls are served up as a web interface so that you’re not limited to say an Android device. The UI can be customized by choosing what buttons you will use and where to place them on the display. You can get a good feel for this by viewing this G+ album. Setup is made a bit easier thanks to an add-on system that has predefined layouts for common things like controlling XBMC.

The hardware seen above is the business end of Webmote. It’s an Arduino with an IR receiver, IR LED, and an XBee module. For your common home entertainment devices you can teach the system your codes using the IR receiver. The IR LED is used to transmit those codes back, and the Xbee gives you the ability to control X10 (home automation) devices. Right now the setup requires the hardware be connected to a server via USB, but it shouldn’t be hard to set up some type of wireless alternative.


Filed under: home entertainment hacks

iPacemaker with Arduino

When we say “there are no limit for  Arduino”, here we have a project,  sent by [ladvine] in wich Arduino meets biomedic tech. The WiFi shield is the real application when they speak about Arduino. There is a long paper about it on this [website] that I suggest to visit to understand more this important project.

iPacemaker is an reprogrammable implant pacemaker with wireless connectivity.
A user friendly embedded web interface helps in changing every parameters of the implantable pacemaker. The important feature is the WiFi alliance complaint hardware which supports every wireless device to establish connection with the IMD. GSM connectivity can be used in absence of WiFi in remote areas helping in Telemetry.
Wireless protection in case of WiFi is enabled through WPA2 security with AES Encryption and Java Web interface which has inherent security capabilities. Shielding the GSM and WiFi antennas helps reduce unwanted patient radiations.

Arduino Blog 14 Dec 17:21

Programming Arduino on the cloud: codebender

codebender is web-based IDE, mainly built with HTML5 and Javascript, that focuses on the development for the Arduino platform. Since it is going to be used directly from the browser (note that currently codebender is still beta), it will further simplify the whole development process, avoiding the installation of software and libraries on the local machine.

From the home page of the project:

We want to lower the barrier to entry, which is necessary to help everyday people start their first project, become makers and advance technology instead of using it. codebender requires no installation, so you can get started with Arduino programming the minute you get one in your hands! And with the development tools we provide, you can do so faster and easier! codebender also stores your code on the cloud, so it’s safe and accessible from anywhere, anytime.

Several nice features will be available soon, such as remote flashing: together with an Ethernet shield flashed with a properly designed TFTP bootloader, you will be able to upload a sketch remotely, over the internet! Another nice feature regards its integration with the open documentation available on the Arduino website, which will be accessible directly from the IDE by selecting a piece of code and, then, by pressing ctrl+space.

More information can be found here.

[Via: HackADay and codebender's website]

Publishing data on the web with Node.JS

Many solutions exist for publishing data coming from Arduino boards on the web. Bangon Kali, in his detailed tutorial, proposes his novel approach, which makes use of several widespread and open-source technologies, such as Node.JS, jQuery and Apache:

Using the USB, the Arduino Board is connected to the PC serially to a certain COM port which the OS allocates. Node.JS, the asynchronous server side JavaScript engine then listens for the port using a Node.JS module called SerialPort2. When a signal is received, using the Node.JS Socket.IO module, data is then served also asynchronously to the web providing a real time feed of the Arduino signal.

The tutorial (which can be applied on Linux, Mac OS and Windows) can be found here.

[Via: DangerousPrototypes and The Code Project]

Arduino Blog 05 Jun 15:31