Posts with «magnetic» label

An Arduino-powered mini turntable with magnetic attachments

If you need a motorized turntable for filming or simply to display your latest project, here’s an easy 3D-printable option from Ali of Potent Printables

The design takes two forms—one using a full-sized hobby servo, and a smaller version that employs a micro servo for motion, both of which are set up for continuous rotation.

Electronics for the project are fairly straightforward, with an Arduino Uno powering the tables via an Adafruit Motor Shield. While this could be expanded for different I/O or sensor use, the clever bit of this configuration is its interchangeable design. A master circle is connected to the servo horn, while the swappable plates attach to it with magnets, accommodating a flat surface, mounting holes, or even LEGO bricks.

Grow Crystals That Glow with Magnetic Induction

You can grow a crystal around an LED light that's powered by magnetic induction.

Read more on MAKE

The post Grow Crystals That Glow with Magnetic Induction appeared first on Make: DIY Projects and Ideas for Makers.

MagnID – Sneaky New Way of Interacting With Tablets

New magnetic tech dubbed “MagnID” is being presented this weekend at Stanford’s annual TEI conference. It is a clever hack aimed to hijack a tablet’s compass sensor and force it to recognize multiple objects. Here is a sneak peek at the possibilities of magnetic input for tablets.

Many tablets come with some sort of triaxial magnetic sensor but as [Andrea] and [Ian]’s demo shows, they are only capable of passing along the aggregate vector of all magnetic forces. If one had multiple magnetic objects, the sensor is not able to provide much useful information.

Their solution is a mix of software and hardware. Each object is given a magnet that rotates at a different known speed. This creates complex sinusoidal magnetic fields that can be mathematically isolated with bandpass filters. This also gives them distance to each object. The team added an Arduino with a magnetometer for reasons unexplained, perhaps the ones built into tablets are not sufficient?

The demo video below shows off what is under the hood and some new input mechanics for simple games, sketching, and a logo turtle. Their hope is that this opens the door to all manner of tangible devices.

Check out their demo at Standford’s 9th annual “Tangible, Embedded, Embodied Interaction” this January 15-19, 2015.


Filed under: handhelds hacks, tablet pcs hacks

Hamster tracker

Primary image

What does it do?

Trackes the running distance for a hamster wheel.

Hamster tracker is a project that came from a hamster forum, my GF reads. A guy there had put a bike computer on his the hamster wheel to measure the speed.

I thought that I could do that in a bit more complicated way. So I started to figure out, what we needed and the speed would just not do it for me. So I thought that the proper way to it, would be to store all the runs in a database, for later analysis. This would also make it possible to display some info on the internet.

Cost to build

$20,00

Embedded video

Finished project

Complete

Number

Time to build

20 hours

Type

URL to more information

Weight

read more