Posts with «home» label

Assemble a Robot Opponent for Air Hockey

Use JJ Robots' kit and your Android phone to build an air hockey partner who's always game.

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This Stranger (Internet of) Things Wall Receives Messages from Your Phone

Seattle-based Makerologist created this Stranger Things wall with a very keen attention to the details.

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The post This Stranger (Internet of) Things Wall Receives Messages from Your Phone appeared first on Make: DIY Projects and Ideas for Makers.

Simple Arduino-Controlled, No-Pump Plant Watering

Make this computer-controlled plant watering system that doesn't use a pump.

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Back to School with This Circuit Playground Class Scheduler

Kid's class calendar too complicated? Make this class scheduler to keep it all straight.

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Make a Wi-Fi Enabled Light Switch Turner Onner

Use a servo to flick a light switch mechanically — without ever touching 110V power — with this Wi-Fi “Turner Onner”

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How To Keep An Unruly Dryer In Line

If necessity is the mother of invention, then inconvenience is its frustrating co-conspirator. Faced with a finicky dryer that would shut down mid-cycle with a barely audible beep if its load was uneven (leaving a soggy mass of laundry), [the0ry] decided to add the dryer to the Internet of Things so it could send them an email whenever it shut itself down.

After opening a thinger.io account, adding the soon-to-be device, and setting up the email notification process, [the0ry] combined the ESP8266 Development Board, a photosensitive resistor, and a 5V power supply on a mini breadboard. All that was left was to mount it on the dryer and direct the LDR (light-dependent resistor) to the machine’s door lock LED to trigger an email when it turned off — indicating the cycle had finished or terminated prematurely. A little tape ensured the LDR would only be tripped by the desired light source.

If you’re an apartment-dweller have WiFi in the wash area it would be awesome to see a battery-powered version you take with you. But in general this is a great hardware blueprint as many device have status LEDs that can be monitored in a similar way. If you want to keep the server in-house (literally in this case) check out the Minimal MQTT series [Elliot Williams] recently finished up. It uses a Raspberry Pi as the center server and an ESP8266 is one of the limitless examples of hardware that plays nicely with the protocol.

We love seeing hacks like this because not only does it conserve water and energy by reducing instances of rewashing, but it’s also a clever way to extend the life of an appliance and potentially save hundreds of dollars in replacing it. Add this to the bevvy of hacks that add convenience to one’s home — some of which produce delicious results.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, home hacks

Illuminate Your Walls with Beehive-Inspired Modular Lighting

Honeycomb patterns inspired the design behind this light fixture. The modular design means the shape can be reconfigured.

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The post Illuminate Your Walls with Beehive-Inspired Modular Lighting appeared first on Make: DIY Projects and Ideas for Makers.

Build a Behemoth Cold Brew Coffee Drip Tower

You can buy large cold-brew towers, but they’re very expensive, aimed at coffee shops. Instead you can make your own automated tower that uses arduino.

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The post Build a Behemoth Cold Brew Coffee Drip Tower appeared first on Make: DIY Projects and Ideas for Makers.

Transform an Ikea Side Table into a Music Visualizer

Use some LEDs to upgrade a $10 Ikea side table into a centerpiece that bumps and jives to the beat of your tunes. Get your freq on!

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The post Transform an Ikea Side Table into a Music Visualizer appeared first on Make: DIY Projects and Ideas for Makers.

Small Experiments in DIY Home Security

[Dann Albright] writes about some small experiments he’s done in home security.

He starts with the simplest. Which is to purchase an off the shelf web camera, and hook it up to software built to do the task. The first software he uses is the free, iSpy open source software. This adds basic features like motion detection, time stamping, logging, and an interface. He also explores other commercial options.

Next he delves a bit deeper. He starts by making a simple motion detector. When the Arduino detects motion using a PIR sensor it gets a computer to text an alert. After the tutorial begins to veer a little and he adds his WiFi light bulbs to the mix. Now he can send an email and change the color of the lights.

We suppose, that from a security standpoint. It would really freak a burglar out if all the lights turned red when they walked into a room. Either way, there’s definitely a fun weekend project in playing around with all these systems.


Filed under: home hacks
Hack a Day 24 Apr 12:00