Posts with «color» label

Color Sensor Demystified

When [millerman4487] bought a TCS230-based color sensor, he was expecting a bit more documentation. Since he didn’t get it, he did a little research and some experimentation and wrote it up to help the rest of us.

The TCS3200 uses an 8×8 array of photodiodes. The 64 diodes come in four groups of 16. One group has a blue filter, one has green and the other has a red filter. The final set of diodes has no filter at all. You can select which group of diodes is active at any given time.

Sixteen photodiodes have blue filters, 16 photodiodes have green filters, 16 photodiodes have red filters, and 16 photodiodes are clear with no filters. The four types (colors) of photodiodes are interdigitated to minimize the effect of non-uniformity of incident irradiance. All photodiodes of the same color are connected in parallel. Pins S2 and S3 are used to select which group of photodiodes (red, green, blue, clear) are active.

The output of the array is a frequency that corresponds to the light intensity measured by one bank of photodiodes. You’ll need to make several pulse input measurements to compute the color and [millernam4487] provides code for it. You may, however, need to calibrate the device before you get good results.

We’ve looked at color sensors before, of course. They can even unlock doors.

Hack a Day 23 Jan 19:30

Color-Coded Key Opens Doors, Opportunities

Of all the ways to open up a lock, there are some tried and true methods. Keys, combinations, RFIDs, picks, and explosives have all had their time and place, but now someone else wants to try something new. [Erik] has come up with a lock that opens when it is shown a pattern of colors.

The lock in question uses a set of color coded cards as the “keys”. When the cards are inserted in the lock, a TCS230 color sensor interprets the pattern on the cards and sends the information over to an Arduino Uno. From there, the Arduino can command the physical lock to open if the pattern is a match, although [Erik] is still waiting on the locking mechanism to arrive while he continues to prototype the device.

This is a fairly unique idea with a number of upsides. First, the code can’t be “stolen” from inside a wallet like RFID cards can. (Although if you can take a picture of the card all bets are off.) If you lose your key, you can simply print another one, and the device is able to handle multiple different keys and log the usage of each one. Additionally, no specialized equipment is needed to create the cards, unlike technologies that rely on magnetic strips. Of course, there’s always this classic way of opening doors if you’d rather go old school with your home locks.

Hack a Day 10 Mar 00:00

Tutorial – Arduino and Color LCD

Learn how to use an inexpensive colour LCD shield with your Arduino. This is chapter twenty-eight of our huge Arduino tutorial series.

Updated 03/02/2014

There are many colour LCDs on the market that can be used with an Arduino, and for this tutorial we’re using a relatively simple model available that is available from suppliers such as Tronixlabs, based on a small LCD originally used in Nokia 6100 mobile phones:

These are a convenient and inexpensive way of displaying data, or for monitoring variables when debugging a sketch. Before getting started, a small amount of work is required.

From the two examples we have seen, neither of them arrive fitted with stacking headers (or in Sparkfun’s case – not included) or pins, so before doing anything you’ll need to fit your choice of connector. Although the LCD shield arrived with stacking headers, we used in-line pins as another shield would never be placed on top:

Which can easily be soldered to the shield in a few minutes:

 While we’re on the subject of pins – this shield uses D3~D5 for the three buttons, and D8, 9, 11 and 13 for the LCD interface. The shield takes 5V and doesn’t require any external power for the backlight. The LCD module has a resolution of 128 x 128 pixels, with nine defined colours (red, green, blue, cyan, magenta, yellow, brown, orange, pink) as well as black and white.

So let’s get started. From a software perspective, the first thing to do is download and install the library for the LCD shield. Visit the library page here. Then download the .zip file, extract and copy the resulting folder into your ..\arduino-1.0.x\libraries folder. Be sure to rename the folder to “ColorLCDShield“. Then restart the Arduino IDE if it was already open.

At this point let’s check the shield is working before moving forward. Once fitted to your Arduino, upload the ChronoLCD_Color sketch that’s included with the library, from the IDE Examples menu:

This will result with a neat analogue clock you can adjust with the buttons on the shield, as shown in this video.

It’s difficult to photograph the LCD – (some of them have very bright backlights), so the image may not be a true reflection of reality. Nevertheless this shield is easy to use and we will prove this in the following examples. So how do you control the color LCD shield in your sketches?

At the start of every sketch, you will need the following lines:

#include "ColorLCDShield.h"
LCDShield lcd;

as well as the following in void setup():

lcd.init(PHILIPS); 
lcd.contrast(63); // sets LCD contrast (value between 0~63)

With regards to lcd.init(), try it first without a parameter. If the screen doesn’t work, try EPSON instead. There are two versions of the LCD shield floating about each with a different controller chip. The contrast parameter is subjective, however 63 looks good – but test for yourself.

Now let’s move on to examine each function with a small example, then use the LCD shield in more complex applications.

The LCD can display 8 rows of 16 characters of text. The function to display text is:

lcd.setStr("text", y,x, foreground colour, background colour);

where x and y are the coordinates of the top left pixel of the first character in the string. Another necessary function is:

lcd.clear(colour);

Which clears the screen and sets the background colour to the parameter colour.  Please note – when referring to the X- and Y-axis in this article, they are relative to the LCD in the position shown below. Now for an example – to recreate the following display:

… use the following sketch:

// Example 28.1
#include "ColorLCDShield.h"
LCDShield lcd;

void setup()
{
 // following two required for LCD
 lcd.init(PHILIPS); 
 lcd.contrast(63); // sets LCD contrast (value between 0~63)
}

void loop()
{
 lcd.clear(BLACK);
 lcd.setStr("ABCDefghiJKLMNOP", 0,2, WHITE, BLACK);
 lcd.setStr("0123456789012345", 15,2, WHITE, BLACK);
 lcd.setStr("ABCDefghiJKLMNOP", 30,2, WHITE, BLACK);
 lcd.setStr("0123456789012345", 45,2, WHITE, BLACK);
 lcd.setStr("ABCDefghiJKLMNOP", 60,2, WHITE, BLACK);
 lcd.setStr("0123456789012345", 75,2, WHITE, BLACK);
 lcd.setStr("ABCDefghiJKLMNOP", 90,2, WHITE, BLACK);
 lcd.setStr("0123456789012345", 105,2, WHITE, BLACK);
 do {} while (1>0);
}

In example 28.1 we used the function lcd.clear(), which unsurprisingly cleared the screen and set the background a certain colour.

Let’s have a look at the various background colours in the following example. The lcd.clear()  function is helpful as it can set the entire screen area to a particular colour. As mentioned earlier, there are the predefined colours red, green, blue, cyan, magenta, yellow, brown, orange, pink, as well as black and white. Here they are in the following example:

// Example 28.2

int del = 1000;
#include "ColorLCDShield.h"
LCDShield lcd; 
void setup() 
{ 
  // following two required for LCD 
  lcd.init(PHILIPS); 
  lcd.contrast(63); // sets LCD contrast (value between 0~63) 
}

void loop()
{
 lcd.clear(WHITE);
 lcd.setStr("White", 39,40, WHITE, BLACK);
 delay(del);
 lcd.clear(BLACK);
 lcd.setStr("Black", 39,40, WHITE, BLACK);
 delay(del);
 lcd.clear(YELLOW);
 lcd.setStr("Yellow", 39,40, WHITE, BLACK);
 delay(del);
 lcd.clear(PINK);
 lcd.setStr("Pink", 39,40, WHITE, BLACK);
 delay(del);
 lcd.clear(MAGENTA);
 lcd.setStr("Magenta", 39,40, WHITE, BLACK);
 delay(del);
 lcd.clear(CYAN);
 lcd.setStr("Cyan", 39,40, WHITE, BLACK);
 delay(del);
 lcd.clear(BROWN);
 lcd.setStr("Brown", 39,40, WHITE, BLACK);
 delay(del);
 lcd.clear(ORANGE);
 lcd.setStr("Orange", 39,40, WHITE, BLACK);
 delay(del);
 lcd.clear(BLUE);
 lcd.setStr("Blue", 39,40, WHITE, BLACK);
 delay(del);
 lcd.clear(RED);
 lcd.setStr("Red", 39,40, WHITE, BLACK);
 delay(del);
 lcd.clear(GREEN);
 lcd.setStr("Green", 39,40, WHITE, BLACK);
 delay(del);
}

And now to see it in action. In this demonstration video the colours are more livid in real life, unfortunately the camera does not capture them so well.

 

Now that we have had some experience with the LCD library’s functions, we can move on to drawing some graphical objects. Recall that the screen has a resolution of 128 by 128 pixels. We have four functions to make use of this LCD real estate, so let’s see how they work. The first is:

lcd.setPixel(int colour, Y, X);

This function places a pixel (one LCD dot) at location x, y with the colour of colour.

Note – in this (and all the functions that have a colour parameter) you can substitute the colour (e.g. BLACK) for a 12-bit RGB value representing the colour required. Next is:

lcd.setLine(x0, y0, x1, y1, COLOUR);

Which draws a line of colour COLOUR, from position x0, y0 to x1, y1. Our next function is:

lcd.setRect(x0, y0, x1, y1, fill, COLOUR);

This function draws an oblong or square of colour COLOUR with the top-left point at x0, y0 and the bottom right at x1, y1. Fill is set to 0 for an outline, and 1 for a filled oblong. It would be convenient for drawing bar graphs for data representation. And finally, we can also create circles, using:

lcd.setCircle(x, y, radius, COLOUR);

X and Y is the location for the centre of the circle, radius and COLOUR are self-explanatory. We will now use these graphical functions in the following demonstration sketch:
// Example 28.3

#include "ColorLCDShield.h"
LCDShield lcd;
int del = 1000;
int xx, yy = 0;

void setup()
{
  lcd.init(PHILIPS); 
  lcd.contrast(63); // sets LCD contrast (value between 0~63)
  lcd.clear(BLACK);
  randomSeed(analogRead(0));
}

void loop()
{
  lcd.setStr("Graphic Function", 40,3, WHITE, BLACK);
  lcd.setStr("Test Sketch", 55, 20, WHITE, BLACK); 
  delay(5000);
  lcd.clear(BLACK);
  lcd.setStr("lcd.setPixel", 40,20, WHITE, BLACK);
  delay(del);
  lcd.clear(BLACK);
  for (int a=0; a<500; a++)
  {
    xx=random(160);
    yy=random(160);
    lcd.setPixel(WHITE, yy, xx);
    delay(10);
  }
  delay(del);
  lcd.clear(BLACK);
  lcd.setStr("LCDDrawCircle", 40,10, WHITE, BLACK);
  delay(del);
  lcd.clear(BLACK); 
  for (int a=0; a<2; a++)
  {
    for (int b=1; b<6; b++)
    {
      xx=b*5;
      lcd.setCircle(32, 32, xx, WHITE);
      delay(200);
      lcd.setCircle(32, 32, xx, BLACK);
      delay(200);
    }
  }
  lcd.clear(BLACK); 
  for (int a=0; a<3; a++)
  {
    for (int b=1; b<12; b++)
    {
      xx=b*5;
      lcd.setCircle(32, 32, xx, WHITE);
      delay(100);
    }
    lcd.clear(BLACK);
  }
  lcd.clear(BLACK); 
  for (int a=0; a<3; a++)
  {
    for (int b=1; b<12; b++)
    {
      xx=b*5;
      lcd.setCircle(32, 32, xx, WHITE);
      delay(100);
    }
    lcd.clear(BLACK);
  }
  delay(del);
  lcd.clear(BLACK);
  lcd.setStr("LCDSetLine", 40,10, WHITE, BLACK);
  delay(del);
  lcd.clear(BLACK); 
  for (int a=0; a<160; a++)
  {
    xx=random(160);
    lcd.setLine(a, 1, xx, a, WHITE);
    delay(10);
  }
  lcd.clear(BLACK);
  lcd.setStr("LCDSetRect", 40,10, WHITE, BLACK);
  delay(del);
  lcd.clear(BLACK); 
  for (int a=0; a<10; a++)
  {
    lcd.setRect(32,32,64,64,0,WHITE);
    delay(200);
    lcd.clear(BLACK);
    lcd.setRect(32,32,64,64,1,WHITE);
    delay(200);
    lcd.clear(BLACK); 
  }
  lcd.clear(BLACK); 
}

The results of this sketch are shown in this video. For photographic reasons, I will stick with white on black for the colours.

So now you have an explanation of the functions to drive the screen – and only your imagination is holding you back.

Conclusion

Hopefully this tutorial is of use to you. and you’re no longer wondering “how to use a color LCD with Arduino”. They’re available from our tronixlabs store. And if you enjoyed this article, or want to introduce someone else to the interesting world of Arduino – check out my book (now in a third printing!) “Arduino Workshop”.

Have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column, or join our forum – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

The post Tutorial – Arduino and Color LCD appeared first on tronixstuff.

Tutorial – Arduino and Color LCD

Learn how to use an inexpensive colour LCD shield with your Arduino. This is chapter twenty-eight of our huge Arduino tutorial series.

Updated 03/02/2014

There are many colour LCDs on the market that can be used with an Arduino, and for this tutorial we’re using a relatively simple model available that is available from suppliers such as Tronixlabs, based on a small LCD originally used in Nokia 6100 mobile phones:

These are a convenient and inexpensive way of displaying data, or for monitoring variables when debugging a sketch. Before getting started, a small amount of work is required.

From the two examples we have seen, neither of them arrive fitted with stacking headers (or in Sparkfun’s case – not included) or pins, so before doing anything you’ll need to fit your choice of connector. Although the LCD shield arrived with stacking headers, we used in-line pins as another shield would never be placed on top:

Which can easily be soldered to the shield in a few minutes:

 While we’re on the subject of pins – this shield uses D3~D5 for the three buttons, and D8, 9, 11 and 13 for the LCD interface. The shield takes 5V and doesn’t require any external power for the backlight. The LCD module has a resolution of 128 x 128 pixels, with nine defined colours (red, green, blue, cyan, magenta, yellow, brown, orange, pink) as well as black and white.

So let’s get started. From a software perspective, the first thing to do is download and install the library for the LCD shield. Visit the library page here. Then download the .zip file, extract and copy the resulting folder into your ..arduino-1.0.xlibraries folder. Be sure to rename the folder to “ColorLCDShield“. Then restart the Arduino IDE if it was already open.

At this point let’s check the shield is working before moving forward. Once fitted to your Arduino, upload the ChronoLCD_Color sketch that’s included with the library, from the IDE Examples menu:

This will result with a neat analogue clock you can adjust with the buttons on the shield, as shown in this video.

It’s difficult to photograph the LCD – (some of them have very bright backlights), so the image may not be a true reflection of reality. Nevertheless this shield is easy to use and we will prove this in the following examples. So how do you control the color LCD shield in your sketches?

At the start of every sketch, you will need the following lines:

#include "ColorLCDShield.h"
LCDShield lcd;

as well as the following in void setup():

lcd.init(PHILIPS); 
lcd.contrast(63); // sets LCD contrast (value between 0~63)

With regards to lcd.init(), try it first without a parameter. If the screen doesn’t work, try EPSON instead. There are two versions of the LCD shield floating about each with a different controller chip. The contrast parameter is subjective, however 63 looks good – but test for yourself.

Now let’s move on to examine each function with a small example, then use the LCD shield in more complex applications.

The LCD can display 8 rows of 16 characters of text. The function to display text is:

lcd.setStr("text", y,x, foreground colour, background colour);

where x and y are the coordinates of the top left pixel of the first character in the string. Another necessary function is:

lcd.clear(colour);

Which clears the screen and sets the background colour to the parameter colour.  Please note – when referring to the X- and Y-axis in this article, they are relative to the LCD in the position shown below. Now for an example – to recreate the following display:

… use the following sketch:

// Example 28.1
#include "ColorLCDShield.h"
LCDShield lcd;

void setup()
{
 // following two required for LCD
 lcd.init(PHILIPS); 
 lcd.contrast(63); // sets LCD contrast (value between 0~63)
}

void loop()
{
 lcd.clear(BLACK);
 lcd.setStr("ABCDefghiJKLMNOP", 0,2, WHITE, BLACK);
 lcd.setStr("0123456789012345", 15,2, WHITE, BLACK);
 lcd.setStr("ABCDefghiJKLMNOP", 30,2, WHITE, BLACK);
 lcd.setStr("0123456789012345", 45,2, WHITE, BLACK);
 lcd.setStr("ABCDefghiJKLMNOP", 60,2, WHITE, BLACK);
 lcd.setStr("0123456789012345", 75,2, WHITE, BLACK);
 lcd.setStr("ABCDefghiJKLMNOP", 90,2, WHITE, BLACK);
 lcd.setStr("0123456789012345", 105,2, WHITE, BLACK);
 do {} while (1>0);
}

In example 28.1 we used the function lcd.clear(), which unsurprisingly cleared the screen and set the background a certain colour.

Let’s have a look at the various background colours in the following example. The lcd.clear()  function is helpful as it can set the entire screen area to a particular colour. As mentioned earlier, there are the predefined colours red, green, blue, cyan, magenta, yellow, brown, orange, pink, as well as black and white. Here they are in the following example:

// Example 28.2

int del = 1000;
#include "ColorLCDShield.h"
LCDShield lcd; 
void setup() 
{ 
  // following two required for LCD 
  lcd.init(PHILIPS); 
  lcd.contrast(63); // sets LCD contrast (value between 0~63) 
}

void loop()
{
 lcd.clear(WHITE);
 lcd.setStr("White", 39,40, WHITE, BLACK);
 delay(del);
 lcd.clear(BLACK);
 lcd.setStr("Black", 39,40, WHITE, BLACK);
 delay(del);
 lcd.clear(YELLOW);
 lcd.setStr("Yellow", 39,40, WHITE, BLACK);
 delay(del);
 lcd.clear(PINK);
 lcd.setStr("Pink", 39,40, WHITE, BLACK);
 delay(del);
 lcd.clear(MAGENTA);
 lcd.setStr("Magenta", 39,40, WHITE, BLACK);
 delay(del);
 lcd.clear(CYAN);
 lcd.setStr("Cyan", 39,40, WHITE, BLACK);
 delay(del);
 lcd.clear(BROWN);
 lcd.setStr("Brown", 39,40, WHITE, BLACK);
 delay(del);
 lcd.clear(ORANGE);
 lcd.setStr("Orange", 39,40, WHITE, BLACK);
 delay(del);
 lcd.clear(BLUE);
 lcd.setStr("Blue", 39,40, WHITE, BLACK);
 delay(del);
 lcd.clear(RED);
 lcd.setStr("Red", 39,40, WHITE, BLACK);
 delay(del);
 lcd.clear(GREEN);
 lcd.setStr("Green", 39,40, WHITE, BLACK);
 delay(del);
}

And now to see it in action. In this demonstration video the colours are more livid in real life, unfortunately the camera does not capture them so well.

 

Now that we have had some experience with the LCD library’s functions, we can move on to drawing some graphical objects. Recall that the screen has a resolution of 128 by 128 pixels. We have four functions to make use of this LCD real estate, so let’s see how they work. The first is:

lcd.setPixel(int colour, Y, X);

This function places a pixel (one LCD dot) at location x, y with the colour of colour.

Note – in this (and all the functions that have a colour parameter) you can substitute the colour (e.g. BLACK) for a 12-bit RGB value representing the colour required. Next is:

lcd.setLine(x0, y0, x1, y1, COLOUR);

Which draws a line of colour COLOUR, from position x0, y0 to x1, y1. Our next function is:

lcd.setRect(x0, y0, x1, y1, fill, COLOUR);

This function draws an oblong or square of colour COLOUR with the top-left point at x0, y0 and the bottom right at x1, y1. Fill is set to 0 for an outline, and 1 for a filled oblong. It would be convenient for drawing bar graphs for data representation. And finally, we can also create circles, using:

lcd.setCircle(x, y, radius, COLOUR);

X and Y is the location for the centre of the circle, radius and COLOUR are self-explanatory. We will now use these graphical functions in the following demonstration sketch:

// Example 28.3

#include "ColorLCDShield.h"
LCDShield lcd;
int del = 1000;
int xx, yy = 0;

void setup()
{
  lcd.init(PHILIPS); 
  lcd.contrast(63); // sets LCD contrast (value between 0~63)
  lcd.clear(BLACK);
  randomSeed(analogRead(0));
}

void loop()
{
  lcd.setStr("Graphic Function", 40,3, WHITE, BLACK);
  lcd.setStr("Test Sketch", 55, 20, WHITE, BLACK); 
  delay(5000);
  lcd.clear(BLACK);
  lcd.setStr("lcd.setPixel", 40,20, WHITE, BLACK);
  delay(del);
  lcd.clear(BLACK);
  for (int a=0; a<500; a++)
  {
    xx=random(160);
    yy=random(160);
    lcd.setPixel(WHITE, yy, xx);
    delay(10);
  }
  delay(del);
  lcd.clear(BLACK);
  lcd.setStr("LCDDrawCircle", 40,10, WHITE, BLACK);
  delay(del);
  lcd.clear(BLACK); 
  for (int a=0; a<2; a++)
  {
    for (int b=1; b<6; b++)
    {
      xx=b*5;
      lcd.setCircle(32, 32, xx, WHITE);
      delay(200);
      lcd.setCircle(32, 32, xx, BLACK);
      delay(200);
    }
  }
  lcd.clear(BLACK); 
  for (int a=0; a<3; a++)
  {
    for (int b=1; b<12; b++)
    {
      xx=b*5;
      lcd.setCircle(32, 32, xx, WHITE);
      delay(100);
    }
    lcd.clear(BLACK);
  }
  lcd.clear(BLACK); 
  for (int a=0; a<3; a++)
  {
    for (int b=1; b<12; b++)
    {
      xx=b*5;
      lcd.setCircle(32, 32, xx, WHITE);
      delay(100);
    }
    lcd.clear(BLACK);
  }
  delay(del);
  lcd.clear(BLACK);
  lcd.setStr("LCDSetLine", 40,10, WHITE, BLACK);
  delay(del);
  lcd.clear(BLACK); 
  for (int a=0; a<160; a++)
  {
    xx=random(160);
    lcd.setLine(a, 1, xx, a, WHITE);
    delay(10);
  }
  lcd.clear(BLACK);
  lcd.setStr("LCDSetRect", 40,10, WHITE, BLACK);
  delay(del);
  lcd.clear(BLACK); 
  for (int a=0; a<10; a++)
  {
    lcd.setRect(32,32,64,64,0,WHITE);
    delay(200);
    lcd.clear(BLACK);
    lcd.setRect(32,32,64,64,1,WHITE);
    delay(200);
    lcd.clear(BLACK); 
  }
  lcd.clear(BLACK); 
}

The results of this sketch are shown in this video. For photographic reasons, I will stick with white on black for the colours.

So now you have an explanation of the functions to drive the screen – and only your imagination is holding you back.

Conclusion

Hopefully this tutorial is of use to you. and you’re no longer wondering “how to use a color LCD with Arduino”. They’re available from our tronixlabs store. And if you enjoyed this article, or want to introduce someone else to the interesting world of Arduino – check out my book (now in a third printing!) “Arduino Workshop”.

Have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column, or join our forum – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

Review – Freetronics 128×128 Pixel Colour OLED Module

Introduction

Time for another review, and in this instalment we have the new 128×128 Pixel OLED Module from Freetronics. It’s been a while since we’ve had a full-colour graphic display to experiment with, and this one doesn’t disappoint. Unlike other displays such as LCD, this one uses OLED – “Organic Light-Emitting Diode” technology.

OLEDs allow for a faster refresh rate, and to the naked eye has a great amount of colour contrast. Furthermore the viewing angles are excellent, you can clearly read the display from almost any angle, for example:

However they can suffer from burn-in from extended display of the same thing so that does need to be taken into account. Nevertheless they provide an inexpensive and easy-to-use method of displaying colour text, graphics and even video from a variety of development boards. Finally – there is also a microSD socket for data logging, image storage or other uses. However back to the review unit. It arrives in typical retail packaging:

and includes the OLED display itself, a nifty reusable parts tray/storage box, and two buttons. The display has a resolution of 128 x 128 pixels and has a square display area with a diagonal size of 38.1 mm. The unit itself is quite compact:

The display is easily mounted using the holes on the left and right-hand side of the display. The designers have also allowed space for an LED, current-limiting resistor and button on each side, for user input or gaming – perfect for the  included buttons. However this section of the PCB is also scored-off so you can remove them if required. Using the OLED isn’t difficult, and tutorials have been provided for both Arduino and Raspberry Pi users.

Using with Arduino

After installing the Arduino library, it’s a simple matter of running some jumper wires from the Arduino or compatible board to the display – explained in detail with the “Quickstart” guide. Normally I would would explain how to use the display myself, however in this instance a full guide has been published which explains how to display text of various colours, graphics, displaying images stored on a microSD card and more. Finally there’s some interesting demonstration sketches included with the library. For example, displaying large amounts of text:

… the variety of fonts available:

… and for those interested in monitoring changing data types, a very neat ECG-style of sketch:

… and the mandatory rotating cube from a Freetronics forum member:

Using with Raspberry Pi

For users of this popular single-board computer, there’s a great tutorial and some example videos available on the Freetronics website for your consideration, such as the following video clip playback:

Support

Along with the Arduino and Raspberry Pi tutorials, there’s also the Freetronics support forum where members have been experimenting with accelerated drivers, demonstrations and more.

Competition!

For a chance to win your own OLED display, send a postcard with your email address clearly printed on the back to:

OLED Competition, PO Box 5435 Clayton 3168 Australia. 

Cards must be received by 24/10/2013. One card will then be selected at random and the winner will be sent one Freetronics OLED Display. Prize will be delivered by Australia Post standard air mail. We’re not responsible for customs or import duties, VAT, GST, import duty, postage delays, non-delivery or whatever walls your country puts up against receiving inbound mail.

Conclusion

Compared to previous colour LCD units used in the past, OLED technology is a great improvement – and demonstrated very well with this unit. Furthermore you get the whole package – anyone call sell you a display, however Freetronics also have the support, tutorials, drivers and backup missing from other retailers. So if you need a colour display, check it out.

And for more detail, full-sized images from this article can be found on flickr. And if you’re interested in learning more about Arduino, or want to introduce someone else to the interesting world of Arduino – check out my book (now in a third printing!) “Arduino Workshop” from No Starch Press.

In the meanwhile have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column? And join our friendly Google Group – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

[Note – OLED display was a promotional consideration from Freetronics]

The post Review – Freetronics 128×128 Pixel Colour OLED Module appeared first on tronixstuff.

Tutorial – Arduino and ILI9325 colour TFT LCD modules

Learn how to use inexpensive ILI9325 colour TFT LCD modules in chapter fifty of a series originally titled “Getting Started/Moving Forward with Arduino!” by John Boxall – A tutorial on the Arduino universe. The first chapter is here, the complete series is detailed here.

Introduction

Colour TFT LCD modules just keep getting cheaper, so in this tutorial we’ll show you how to get going with some of the most inexpensive modules we could find. The subject of our tutorial is a 2.8″ 240 x 320 TFT module with the ILI9325 LCD controller chip. If you look in ebay this example should appear pretty easily, here’s a photo of the front and back to help identify it:

There is also the line “HY-TFT240_262k HEYAODZ110510” printed on the back of the module. They should cost less than US$10 plus shipping. Build quality may not be job number one at the factory so order a few, however considering the cost of something similar from other retailers it’s cheap insurance. You’ll also want sixteen male to female jumper wires to connect the module to your Arduino.

Getting started

To make life easier we’ll use an Arduino library “UTFT” written for this and other LCD modules. It has been created by Henning Karlsen and can be downloaded from his website. If you can, send him a donation – this library is well worth it. Once you’ve downloaded and installed the UTFT library, the next step is to wire up the LCD for a test.

Run a jumper from the following LCD module pins to your Arduino Uno (or compatible):

  • DB0 to DB7 > Arduino D0 to D7 respectively
  • RD > 3.3 V
  • RSET > A2
  • CS > A3
  • RW > A4
  • RS > A5
  • backlight 5V > 5V
  • backlight GND > GND

Then upload the following sketch – Example 50.1. You should be presented with the following on your display:

If you’re curious, the LCD module and my Eleven board draws 225 mA of current. If that didn’t work for you, double-check the wiring against the list provided earlier. Now we’ll move forward and learn how to display text and graphics.

Sketch preparation

You will always need the following before void setup():

#include "UTFT.h"
UTFT myGLCD(ILI9325C,19,18,17,16); // for Arduino Uno

and in void setup():

myGLCD.InitLCD(orientation); 
myGLCD.clrScr();

with the former command, change orientation to either LANDSCAPE to PORTRAIT depending on how you’ll view the screen. You may need further commands however these are specific to features that will be described below. The function .clrScr() will clear the screen.

Displaying Text

There are three different fonts available with the library. To use them add the following three lines before void setup():

extern uint8_t SmallFont[];
extern uint8_t BigFont[];
extern uint8_t SevenSegNumFont[];

When displaying text you’ll need to define the foreground and background colours with the following:

myGLCD.setColor(red, green, blue); 
myGLCD.setBackColor(red, green, blue);

Where red, green and blue are values between zero and 255. So if you want white use 255,255,255 etc. For some named colours and their RGB values, click here. To select the required font, use one of the following:

myGLCD.setFont(SmallFont); // Allows 20 rows of 40 characters
myGLCD.setFont(BigFont); // Allows 15 rows of 20 characters
myGLCD.setFont(SevenSegNumFont); // allows display of 0 to 9 over four rows

Now to display the text use the function:

myGLCD.print("text to display",x, y);

where text is what you’d like to display, x is the horizontal alignment (LEFT, CENTER, RIGHT) or position in pixels from the left-hand side of the screen and y is the starting point of the top-left of the text. For example, to start at the top-left of the display y would be zero. You can also display a string variable instead of text in inverted commas.

You can see all this in action with the following sketch – Example 50.2, which is demonstrated in the following video:

Furthremore, you can also specify the angle of display, which gives a simple way of displaying text on different slopes. Simply add the angle as an extra parameter at the end:

myGLCD.print("Hello, world", 20, 20, angle);

Again, see the following sketch – Example 50.2a, and the results below:

Displaying Numbers

Although you can display numbers with the text functions explained previously, there are two functions specifically for displaying integers and floats.

You can see these functions in action with the following sketch – Example 50.3, with an example of the results below:

Displaying Graphics

There’s a few graphic functions that can be used to create required images. The first is:.

myGLCD.fillScr(red, green, blue);

which is used the fill the screen with a certain colour. The next simply draws a pixel at a specified x,y location:

myGLCD.drawPixel(x,y);

Remember that the top-left of the screen is 0,0. Moving on, to draw a single line, use:

myGLCD.drawLine(x1,0,x2,239);

where the line starts at x1,y1 and finishes at x2,y2. Need a rectangle? Use:

myGLCD.drawRect(x1,y2,x2,y2); // for open rectangles
myGLCD.fillRect(x1,y2,x2,y2); // for filled rectangles

where the top-left of the rectangle is x1,y1 and the bottom-right is x2, y2. You can also have rectangles with rounded corners, just use:

myGLCD.drawRoundRect(x1,y2,x2,y2); // for open rectangles
myGLCD.fillRoundRect(x1,y2,x2,y2); // for filled rectangles

instead. And finally, circles – which are quite easy. Just use:

myGLCD.drawCircle(x,y,r); // draws open circle
myGLCD.fillCircle(x,y,r); // draws a filled circle

where x,y are the coordinates for the centre of the circle, and r is the radius. For a quick demonstration of all the graphic functions mentioned so far, see Example 50.4 – and the following video:

Displaying bitmap images

If you already have an image in .gif, .jpg or .png format that’s less than 300 KB in size, this can be displayed on the LCD. To do so, the file needs to be converted to an array which is inserted into your sketch. Let’s work with a simple example to explain the process. Below is our example image:

Save the image of the puppy somewhere convenient, then visit this page. Select the downloaded file, and select the .c and Arduino radio buttons, then click “make file”. After a moment or two a new file will start downloading. When it arrives, open it with a text editor – you’ll see it contains a huge array and another #include statement – for example:

Past the #include statement and the array into your sketch above void setup(). After doing that, don’t be tempted to “autoformat” the sketch in the Arduino IDE. Now you can use the following function to display the bitmap on the LCD:

myGLCD.drawBitmap(x,y,width,height, name, scale);

Where x and y are the top-left coordinates of the image, width and height are the … width and height of the image, and name is the name of the array. Scale is optional – you can double the size of the image with this parameter. For example a value of two will double the size, three triples it – etc. The function uses simple interpolation to enlarge the image, and can be a clever way of displaying larger images without using extra memory. Finally, you can also display the bitmap on an angle – using:

myGLCD.drawBitmap(x,y,width,height, name, angle, cx, cy);

where angle is the angle of rotation and cx/cy are the coordinates for the rotational centre of the image.

The bitmap functions using the example image have been used in the following sketch – Example 50.5, with the results in the following video:

Unfortunately the camera doesn’t really do the screen justice, it looks much better with the naked eye.

What about the SD card socket and touch screen?

The SD socket didn’t work, and I won’t be working with the touch screen at this time.

Conclusion

So there you have it – an incredibly inexpensive and possibly useful LCD module. Thank you to Henning Karlsen for his useful library, and if you found it useful – send him a donation via his page.

In the meanwhile have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column? And join our friendly Google Group – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website. Sign up – it’s free, helpful to each other –  and we can all learn something.

The post Tutorial – Arduino and ILI9325 colour TFT LCD modules appeared first on tronixstuff.

Tronixstuff 26 Apr 02:31