Posts with «buy» label

ProMini clock shield with OLED display

This is another ProMini clock shield kit, this time featuring a 128x64 I2C OLED display.


The kit can be purchased with or without the OLED display (I prefer you buy the OLED on your own, for example this excellent one from miker).

  US$30, includes OLED display, free shipping to North America

  US$16, OLED not included, free shipping to North America

The kit includes:
  • PCB
  • DS1307 SMD
  • 32kHz crystal
  • CR1220 coin battery
  • battery holder
  • optional: I2C 128x64 OLED display (blue or white)
  • tactile switch (2x)
  • resistor 10k (2x)
  • machined male pins


The PCB was designed to accommodate I2C OLED displays with the 4-pin header configured either as VCC-GND-SDA-SCL or as VCC-GND-SCL-SDA.

The OLED clock can also be powered from the same LiPo battery shield for ProMini, as used in the bubble clock. To minimize current consumption (beside disabling the ProMini on-board LEDs), the processor can be awaken from sleep at the push of the "hours" button (on D3).

Schematic and board layout are shown below.



The OLED clock could show the time in many different ways, including Pong mode (sketch adapted from miker), analog clock mode, digital clock mode (sample sketches to be provided soon).

Wise time with Arduino 30 Aug 23:28
buy  i2c  

ProMini clock shield with 7-segment bubble display

This clock was designed as a ProMini shield. It comes as a mostly-SMD kit, based on DS1307 with battery backup and the QDSP-6064 7-segment LED "bubble" display.


   US$18, free shipping to North America

The kit includes the following:
  • PCB
  • QDSP-6064
  • DS1307 SMD
  • 32kHz crystal
  • CR1220 coin battery
  • battery holder
  • 330 ohm resistor 0805 (8x)
  • tactile switch SMD (2x)
  • machined female pins



The assembled clock can be fitted with a LiPo battery shield for ProMini, as shown in this post (source code also provided there).
The current draw (measured at 20mA with an unmodified ProMini) can be minimized by removing the 2 LEDs on the ProMini board, as well as dimming the 7-segment bubble display through software (SevSeg library). One other way of maximizing the LiPo battery life cycle is by waking the clock from sleep mode at the press of the "minutes" button (on D2).

Schematic and board layout are shown below.




Black Friday (and beyond) sale

I was going to have a Black Friday sale anyway, but now I have one more reason for it, and it's an embarrassing one: the latest batch of PCBs have a little flaw, but they can be easily fixed. So, until I run out of them, both the Wise Clock 4 kit and the Complete Wise Clock 4 kit will be $10 less, for $57 and $115 respectively. (As always, I also offer discounts for multiple units, just ask.)

The photos below show a few ways to fix it. Basically, the GND terminal of the USB connector is disconnected from the board's ground. The short wire re-connects them again.


The sleekest way would be on the bottom, using a resistor terminal inserted together with the 2x8-pin female header, as shown in the photo below.


Solder the other end together with the 6-pin FTDI connector.

Here is the story of how this happened. The PCB used to be 101.2 mm in length. That was 1.2 mm longer than the 10 cm limit imposed when using Seeedstudio's PCB prototyping service. I never had a problem before, I always got them manufactured like they were 10 cm in length. Now, Seeedstudio decided to enforce the 10 cm limit (or pay up like they were in the next size bracket). I reacted by shrinking the board, cutting 1.2 mm from the right side. It seems that the 1.2 mm side was very important.

There is more, unfortunately: in the process of generating the Gerber files, I even forgot to select the "Top names" for the silkscreen, so now the resistors are not named at all.


When you install the resistors, keep in mind that 3 of them, with values of 4k7, must be positioned in the correct places, as shown in the assembling instructions. (The other resistors are all 10k, soldered stress-free in the remaining resistor places.)

And that's why the board is now essentially free with the kit. If you don't feel confident that you can do it, please ask me to fix it for you. I will solder the little bridge wire and also solder the three 4k7 resistors correctly. You do the rest.

Note: The photo shows the board bare, but the PCB in the kit comes with the SMD components (SD card socket, the DS3231 and the 3V3 regulator) soldered already.

Buy Complete Wise Clock 4 kit - includes display and enclosure

When you buy the "Complete Wise Clock 4 kit", you get, on top, of the Wise Clock 4 kit, the 3216 bi-color (red/green/orange) LED display from Sure Electronics, plus the enclosure, consisting of two laser-cut plexiglass plates and the required hardware (spacers, screws etc) to assemble it.



  US$125 - free shipping to North America

The "complete kit" comes with everything you need to build a functional Wise Clock 4. You will need to add your own FAT16-formatted SD card (with the necessary files on it), the miniB USB power cable and, eventually, the XBee module (if you want Wise Clock 4 to display remote messages, sent through internet, for example).



Buy Complete Wise Clock 4 kit - includes display and enclosure

When you buy the "Complete Wise Clock 4 kit", you get, on top, of the Wise Clock 4 kit, the 3216 bi-color (red/green/orange) LED display from Sure Electronics, plus the enclosure, consisting of two laser-cut plexiglass plates and the required hardware (spacers, screws etc) to assemble it.



  US$125 - free shipping to North America

The "complete kit" comes with everything you need to build a functional Wise Clock 4. You will need to add your own FAT16-formatted SD card (with the necessary files on it), the miniB USB power cable and, eventually, the XBee module (if you want Wise Clock 4 to display remote messages, sent through internet, for example).




Buy Wise Clock 4 kit

The Wise Clock 4 kit includes the following parts (shown in the photo below):


















  • PCB;
  • SD card socket (pre-soldered);
  • DS3231 extremely accurate RTC (real time clock) chip, soldered to the board;
  • MIC5219 voltage regulator, soldered to the board;
  • 74HC125 level shifter (5V to 3V3), soldered to the board;
  • 2 SMD LEDs (soldered);
  • 3 SMD resistors (soldered);
  • ATmega644P, with the latest Wise Clock 4 software;
  • 40-pin socket; 
  • 16MHz crystal;
  • 2 x 22pF ceramic capacitors;
  • CR1220 backup battery for RTC;
  • holder for the coin battery;
  • 3 x right-angle push buttons;
  • 9 x 10k resistors;
  • 3 x 4k7 resistors;
  • piezo buzzer;
  • USB miniB connector;
  • 6-pin right-angle male header (FTDI connector);
  • two 2x8-pin female headers (display connectors);
  • two 10-pin 2mm female headers (XBee connectors);
  • 220/470 uF electrolytic capacitor;
  • 3 x 100nF decoupling capacitors.
Note that the first bunch of components in the list are SMDs and come soldered to the board (that is, I solder them for you).



   US$67, free shipping to North America

Please contact me for pricing to outside North America. (Usually, for Europe, the price is $5 more.)

To build a finished Wise Clock 4, you need to add your own 3216 display, which plugs directly into the board (no cables are required to connect the Wise Clock 4 board to the display). You will also need to build your own enclosure.

Assembling the Wise Clock 4 kit is very similar to assembling Wise Clock 3, shown here. (The few differences between the two kits are related to the XBee, and are very easy to figure out. Regardless, all new components are SMD and they come pre-soldered.)

If you want the "Complete Wise Clock 4 kit", that includes the 3216 display and a simple yet elegant enclosure, please visit this page.

The ATmega644P processor comes already loaded with the latest software, so you don't need to use the Arduino IDE to compile and upload the code. Essentially, after soldering all components in place, Wise Clock  4 should work right away.

Upgrading the software on Wise Clock 4 (when a new release is published) is similar to Wise Clock 3, and this process is detailed here.

Also note that, although Wise Clock 4 has support for the XBee RF wireless modules, no XBee module is included in this kit.


Buy Wise Clock 4 kit

The Wise Clock 4 kit includes the following parts (shown in the photo below):


















  • PCB;
  • SD card socket (pre-soldered);
  • DS3231 extremely accurate RTC (real time clock) chip, soldered to the board;
  • MIC5219 voltage regulator, soldered to the board;
  • 74HC125 level shifter (5V to 3V3), soldered to the board;
  • 2 SMD LEDs (soldered);
  • 3 SMD resistors (soldered);
  • ATmega644P, with the latest Wise Clock 4 software;
  • 40-pin socket; 
  • 16MHz crystal;
  • 2 x 22pF ceramic capacitors;
  • CR1220 backup battery for RTC;
  • holder for the coin battery;
  • 3 x right-angle push buttons;
  • 9 x 10k resistors;
  • 3 x 4k7 resistors;
  • piezo buzzer;
  • USB miniB connector;
  • 6-pin right-angle male header (FTDI connector);
  • two 2x8-pin female headers (display connectors);
  • two 10-pin 2mm female headers (XBee connectors);
  • 220/470 uF electrolytic capacitor;
  • 3 x 100nF decoupling capacitors.
Note that the first bunch of components in the list are SMDs and come soldered to the board (that is, I solder them for you).



   US$67, free shipping to North America

Please contact me for pricing to outside North America. (Usually, for Europe, the price is $5 more.)

To build a finished Wise Clock 4, you need to add your own 3216 display, which plugs directly into the board (no cables are required to connect the Wise Clock 4 board to the display). You will also need to build your own enclosure.

Assembling the Wise Clock 4 kit is very similar to assembling Wise Clock 3, shown here. (The few differences between the two kits are related to the XBee, and are very easy to figure out. Regardless, all new components are SMD and they come pre-soldered.)

If you want the "Complete Wise Clock 4 kit", that includes the 3216 display and a simple yet elegant enclosure, please visit this page.

The ATmega644P processor comes already loaded with the latest software, so you don't need to use the Arduino IDE to compile and upload the code. Essentially, after soldering all components in place, Wise Clock  4 should work right away.

Upgrading the software on Wise Clock 4 (when a new release is published) is similar to Wise Clock 3, and this process is detailed here.

Also note that, although Wise Clock 4 has support for the XBee RF wireless modules, no XBee module is included in this kit.

Freebees

Updated Nov 17, 2011
Added more free stuff at the bottom of the page.
-----------------------------

Purchase any of my kits and you can get one (or more, if you ask nicely :) freebee from this page (just email me with your choice).

I am currently giving away a few "surplus" boards and LED matrices.
Shown below are, from left to right:















You can also get the PCB for DWex, a small Arduino + RTC, that you can make into a DIY pocket/pendant watch. This board is mostly SMD, but not difficult to solder with a little exercise.















Any of the above PCBs can be used as originally intended (for kits), since there is nothing wrong with them (as far as I know). The challenge in building the LED matrix shields is in finding the right matrices (which is almost impossible, since they were "kind-of" custom made for me by a Chinese LED company some time ago). Nevertheless, one can connect other (compatible, that is common cathodes) types of LED matrices with wires, as this project demonstrates.

Next, there are 2 LED matrices. The left one is a 48mm x 48mm common anode RG, named GMA4688C, for which I couldn't find the datasheet. It is easy to figure out the pin configuration by checking the LEDs with a battery (and resistor, of course). The one on the right is a red LED matrix, 58mm x 58mm in size.















Keep an eye on this page as I will update it periodically. I will soon add other components (LEDs, rotary encoders, ribbon cables, terminal blocks etc) and remove the out-of-stock ones.

Also, if you need other parts for your projects, ask and I may be able to help.

Here is more:
  • SD card (empty) boxes













  • 16-wires ribbon cables













  • DS1307 (either in SMD SOIC or DIP) + crystal 32,768Hz
  • 2-pin terminal block
  • small and flat speaker, 16 ohms













  • LEDs (various shapes, colors and sizes)


























  • rotary encoder (right angle)


























  • laser-cut plexiglass plate (3mm thick) for the 2416 single-color LED display from Sure


Wise time with Arduino 07 Nov 11:29
buy