Posts with «arduino srl» label

First Look – Arduino M0 Pro with 32 bit ARM Cortex M0

Here at tronixstuff we keep an open mind with regards to new hardware, and in this spirit we have the following “first look” of the new Arduino M0 Pro (previously called the Arduino Zero) from Arduino SRL. If the term Arduino SRL is new to you – click here to learn more.

This is the second Arduino-branded board that takes the leap from 8-bit to 32-bit microcontrollers (with the Due being the first), and according to Arduino SRL offers a lot of promise:

With the new Arduino M0 pro board, the more creative individual will have the potential to create one’s most imaginative and new ideas for IoT devices, wearable technologies, high tech automation, wild robotics and other not yet thinkable adventures in the world of makers.

The Arduino M0 pro represents a simple, yet powerful, 32-bit extension of the Arduino UNO platform. The board is powered by Atmel’s SAMD21 MCU, featuring a 32-bit ARM Cortex® M0 core.

With the addition of the M0 board, the Arduino family becomes larger with a new member providing increased performance.

The power of its Atmel’s core gives this board an upgraded flexibility and boosts the scope of projects one can think of and make; moreover, it makes the M0 Pro the ideal educational tool for learning about 32-bit application development.
Atmel’s Embedded Debugger (EDBG), integrated in the board, provides a full debug interface with no need for additional hardware, making debugging much easier. EDBG additionally supports a virtual COM port for device programming and traditional Arduino boot loader functionality uses.

Lots of buzzwords in there, so let’s push that aside and first consider the specifications:

Microcontroller – ATSAMD21G18, 48pins LQFP – the “main” microcontroller
EDBG Microcontroller – AT32UC3A4256, 100pins VFBGA
Operating Voltage – 3.3 V
DC Input Voltage (recommended) – 6-15 V
DC Input Voltage (limits) – 4.5-20 V
Digital I/O Pins – 14, with 12 PWM and UART
Analogue Input Pins – 6, 12-bit ADC channels
Analogue Output Pins – 1, 10-bit DAC
DC Current per I/O Pin – 7 mA
Flash Memory – 256 KB
SRAM – 32 KB
Clock Speed – 48 MHz

Lots of good stuff there – increased clock speed, increased flash memory (sketch space) and SRAM (working memory). No EEPROM however you can emulate one.

Note that the M0 Pro is a 3.3V board – and also the DC current per I/O pin is only 7 mA. Once again the user will need to carefully consider their use of external circuitry and shields to ensure compatibility (as the “classic” Arduino boards are 5V and can happily source/sink much more current per I/O pin).

The ADC (analogue-to-digital) converters have an increased resolution – 12-bit… and the addition of a true DAC (digital-to-analogue) converter allows for a true variable voltage output. This could be useful for sound generation or other effects. You can pore over the complete details including board schematics from the arduino.org website.

Moving on, let’s have a look around the Arduino M0 Pro board itself:

You can’t miss the sticker asking you to download the IDE – as Arduino SRL have forked up the Arduino IDE and run off with it. Click here to download. Upon removing the sticker you have:

Note the connector for the JTAG interface which works in conjunction with Atmel Studio software for debugging. You can also use the USB connection which connects to the EDBG microcontroller (example). When Atmel offers a native MacOS version we’ll investigate that further. SPI isn’t D10~D13 as per the older boards, instead it is accessed via the six pins on the right-hand side of the board. Turning the M0 Pro over doesn’t reveal any surprises:

And like the Due there are two USB ports:

A Programming USB port for uploading sketches through the Arduino IDE and “normal” use, along with a native USB port for direct connection to the main microcontroller’s serial connection. For “regular” Arduino IDE use, you can stick with the Programming port as usual.

So let’s try out the M0 Pro. We’ve downloaded the arduino.org IDE (which can co-exist with the arduino.cc IDE). Drivers are included with the IDE for Windows users, so the board should be plug and play. Note that if you need to reflash the Arduino bootloader – Atmel Studio is required. Moving on – within the Arduino IDE you need to set the board type to “Arduino M0 Pro (Programming Port)”:

… and the Programmer to “M0 Pro Programming Port”:

… both of these options are found in the Tools menu. When using these faster boards we like to run a simple speed test that calculates Newton Approximation for pi using an infinite series, written by Steve Curd from the Arduino forum. You can download the sketch to try yourself.

In previous tests the Arduino Mega2560 completed the test in 5765 ms, and the Arduino Due crushed it in 690 ms. As you can see below the M0 Pro needed 1950 ms for the test:

Not bad at all compared to a Mega. Thus the M0 Pro offers you a neat speed bump in an Uno-compatible form-factor. At this point those of you who enjoy making your own boards and dealing with surface-mount components have an advantage – the Atmel ATSAMD21G18 is available in TQFP package for under US$6… so you could cook up your own high-performance boards. Example.

At this point I’m curious about the onboard 10-bit DAC that’s connected to pin A0, so I connected the DSO to A0 and GND, and uploaded the following sketch:

void setup() 
{
  pinMode(A0,OUTPUT);
}

void loop() 
{
  for (int i=0; i<1024; i++)
  {
    analogWrite(A0,i);
  }
  for (int i=1023; i>=0; --i)
  {
    analogWrite(A0,i);
  }
}

… which resulted with the following neat triangle waveform:

… and here it is with the statistics option:

With a frequency of 108.7 Hz there’s a lot of CPU overhead – no doubt controlling the MCU without the Arduino abstraction will result with increased performance. Finally – for some other interesting examples and “how to” guides for the M0 Pro, visit the Arduino labs page for this board.

Conclusion for now

There are many pros and cons with the Arduino M0 Pro. It is not the best “all round” or beginner’s board due to the limitations of the hardware GPIO. There’s the DAC which could be useful for creating Arduino-controlled power supplies – and plenty of PWM outputs… but don’t directly connect servos to them. However if you can live with the current limits – and need a faster clock speed with an Arduino Uno-compatible board type – then the M0 Pro is an option for you.

Furthermore the M0 Pro offers an interesting bridge into the world of 32-bit microcontrollers, and no doubt the true performance of the MCU can be unlocked by moving away from the Arduino IDE and using Atmel Studio. If you have any questions for the arduino.org team about the Arduino M0 Pro ask in their support forum.

And if you would like your own Arduino M0 Pro – tronixlabs.com is offering a 10% discount off this new board until the end of November 2015. Enter the coupon code “tronixstuff” in the shopping cart page to activate the discount**. tronixlabs.com – which along with being Australia’s #1 Adafruit distributor, also offers a growing range and great value for supported hobbyist electronics from Altronics, DFRobot, Freetronics, Jaycar, Seeedstudio and much much more.

As always, have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column, or join our forum – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website.

** discount not available in conjunction with any other offer, and not valid for CCHS/MELBPC deliveries or pickup orders. 

The post First Look – Arduino M0 Pro with 32 bit ARM Cortex M0 appeared first on tronixstuff.

The Arduino Zero is Now Shipping in the US

Announced over a year ago now during Maker Faire, the Arduino Zero is now finally available for purchase in the United States.

Read more on MAKE

The post The Arduino Zero is Now Shipping in the US appeared first on Make: DIY Projects, How-Tos, Electronics, Crafts and Ideas for Makers.

The Arduino Zero is Now Shipping in the US

Announced over a year ago now during Maker Faire, the Arduino Zero is now finally available for purchase in the United States.

Read more on MAKE

The post The Arduino Zero is Now Shipping in the US appeared first on Make:.

Editorial – Arduino versus Arduino

Over the last few months a large split in the Arduino ecosystem has been made public with some interesting results, and possibly could be the start of the end of the project as we know it. After a few people asked me directly about my thoughts on the Arduino versus Arduino matter, I’ve decided to articulate them in this editorial.

From the beginning the Arduino team has consisted of Massimo Banzi, David Cuartielles, David Mellis, Tom Igoe, and Gianluca Martino – and over the years we have always thought of this core team as the people who brought us the Arduino world.

Furthermore the main manufacturer of the Arduino-branded boards in Italy – “Smart Projects S. r. L” belongs to team member Gianluca Martino, and this organisation paid royalties to the team for the right to manufacture the boards.

Moving on, in 2008 the five formed a company to hold the trademarks and so forth that would allow for more commercial opportunities with regards to licensing and so forth.

However as Massimo wrote in a recent Make: magazine article, Gianluca had registered the Arduino name in Italy amongst other nefarious actions.

To top this off, Massimo tells us that Smart Projects have stopped paying the royalties for over twelve months. This has been most disappointing as being the supplier to Arduino resellers across the globe, resellers thought they were doing the right thing by buying the real boards. A

And to add insult to injury, Smart Projects changed their name to Arduino S. r. L., and was sold by Gianluca Martino in 2014. This company has created their own Arduino website (ending with .org instead of .cc) – and even forked their own version of the IDE and given it a version number starting with 1.7, which is greater than the current 1.6.3. No doubt this will trap a few users into thinking that Arduino S. r. L. (which we’ll shorten to ASrL) is the legitimate supplier and site for Arduino. For more information about the later developments, read this article form Hackaday.

So from what we can tell, the manufacturing member of the original Arduino team has gone off and tried to replicate the Arduino ecosystem under their own terms, allegedly misappropriating the Arduino name and trademark and denying royalties – and is currently still the only source of what have always been “genuine Arduino boards”.

Wow, what a mess.

More keen observers will realise that there isn’t anything wrong with reproducing their own Arduino-compatible boards thanks to the open-source nature of the hardware, and there must be a google of copies, compatibles and knock-offs in the market. And it’s ok to fork the IDE for modify, improve or bork it up to your own requirements as long as yout stick to the original software licence.

However the alleged royalty issue and trademark and name theft is not ok. So where does this leave the Arduino team now? From what I can learn, the rest of the original Arduino team are moving forward and will continue to innovate with new devices and projects which is admirable – and they have agreed to work with manufacturer/retailers such as adafruit to produce new boards (such as the Arduino Gemma).

At this point how does this affect you, as a potential or current Arduino enthusiast? That’s an excellent question. If you have always believed in supporting the Arduino team by purchasing genuine boards – it would seem this option is no longer available until the original team find a new manufacturing partner.

And how does this affect Arduino resellers? As an Arduino reseller ourselves (tronixlabs.com) we made our position as clear as we could at the time. Our position at Tronixlabs is that we want to continue to sell boards that benefit the Arduino team, however we’re a business that aims to meet the needs of all of our customers – and thus we offer compatibles as well.

We have contacted the Arduino team for guidance about future Arduino-branded boards and await their reply. What we do look forward to, however, is a cheaper reseller cost. The freight charge from Europe plus the board costs at the time were quite extraordinary.

Furthermore if Arduino S. r. L introduce a compelling product that people want – hey we’ll sell that as well. The following day Nate from Sparkfun made a similar statement. Whether they make their thoughts public or not, we’re confident that all resellers will take a similar stand, as you don’t want to specifically pick a side in case the other side has a great product that you want to sell. Then again, why would a manufacturer hold back their product to a retailer if said retailer offers products from the competition?

As Kent Brockman would say “… only time will tell”.

From this juncture we look forward to what the Arduino team has for us in the future with great interest… and we’re also following Arduino S. r. L as well to see what they come up with.

However don’t panic – for day to day use nothing has changed for us as enthusiasts. However – do we owe the Arduino team our support? Absolutely – so many people have benefited from their original idea and work for everyone’s benefit. If you feel so inclined, you can directly donate funds to the Arduino project via the IDE download page.

Finally, a great lesson can be learned from these recent events. If your team comes up with a great idea, product or service – before you get serious spend the time and resources required to formalise ownership of intellectual property, naming rights, copyrighted work, and so forth.

We look forward to your thoughts and notes about the situation, which can be left in our moderated comment section. And finally a plug for my own store – tronixlabs.com – offering a growing range and Australia’s best value for supported hobbyist electronics from adafruit, DFRobot, Freetronics, Seeed Studio and much much more.

As always, have fun and keep checking into tronixstuff.com. Why not follow things on twitterGoogle+, subscribe  for email updates or RSS using the links on the right-hand column, or join our forum – dedicated to the projects and related items on this website.

The post Editorial – Arduino versus Arduino appeared first on tronixstuff.

One Arduino


Arduino

is an "open source physical computing platform based on a simple microcontroller board". It is also a "development environment for writing software for the board" (Source: Arduino.cc). The first Arduino was born in 2005 in the classrooms of Interactive Design Institute in Ivrea, Italy. A nice presentation which shows a timeline of "how Arduino came to be" can be found here.
 
Arduino has been a very successful concept and creation. Ten years on, it has become one of, if not, the most popular prototyping and development platforms in the world. It has found it's way into the hearts of many makers, artists, programmers, developers and inventors. It has been used for millions of projects: from automatic garage door openers and tea makers to flamethrowers, robots, lighting displays and sound production. In fact, I cannot think of anything that the Arduino hasn't been used for.
 
But as you are pretty well aware, there has been a recent rift between the original founders of Arduino.
There is no need to go over the details here because it has been covered many times already on other sites. But if you would like to get up to speed on the Arduino Trademark dispute, I would suggest you read the following articles:
 
  1) Massimo Banzi's interview on Make
  2) Federico's letter to the makers on Arduino.org
  3) Court Transcripts from the United States Courts Archive
  4) What's in a name: The battle for the soul of Arduino - on ZD Net
  5) Arduino vs Arduino: Part II on Hackaday


 



My Letter to Arduino LLC/SRL


Why can't you get along? Why the deception? Why the greed?
 
Who does this benefit? It is a lose-lose battle, not only for Arduino SRL/LLC but for the whole Arduino community. We all love Arduino. We love the idea, the mission and the dream. We like to make things... We don't care who "the original" Arduino was or is. It doesn't matter. We just want...

We don't want different versions of the Arduino IDE (1.6.3 vs 1.7.0).
Some may say that you should redo the IDE altogether, but that is an entirely different topic :)

Can't you see what this is doing?
It is hard enough for tutorial makers and forum dwellers to keep up with the ever evolving IDE as it is. Making two different versions of the "same IDE" adds about 10 layers of confusion and complexity ! And for what ??? This will be confusing for the newbie, confusing for the helpers, the developers, for everyone.

I am guessing that my words will have no influence over your decisions. But I hope it does !
I plee with both of you to stand by your infinity symbol and work through your differences. Say what you need to say, but get back together and regroup - as ONE ARDUINO.

Your rift is likely to reverberate through to the Arduino Community aswell. Some people will side with Arduino LLC, some with Arduino SRL. And while some people will take a stance of indifference, there will be some that just look elsewhere.
 
I don't know if revealing the results of my poll will benefit the cause or add salt to the wounds, But I asked the question, and you probably want to know the answer. Who does the Arduino Community support right now?
 
The infographic below shows the results of the poll I posted a week ago:

This poll was posted on the Arduino Tutorial Google+ community page . I tried to be as unbiased as possible. People were only allowed to vote once (enforced by log in). Each voter would have been presented with the organisations in random order. And results were not published until now. The results above are accurate as of 14th April 2015 at 9am (in Australia)
 

As you can clearly see, Arduino LLC is highly favoured.
 
My personal preference is not captured by that infographic. I agree with the bald engineer, I would prefer #OneArduino. I would like the Arduino Community to stand united. I also want the Arduino founders to stand united! Please, work through your issues, stop being greedy and stop the deception. Arduino is more than a product. It is the heart of a greater movement.

This war is pointless - please STOP !

Kind Regards
Scott C



Arduino SRL to Distributors: “We’re the REAL Arduino”

Arduino SRL (formerly known as Smart Projects SRL) sent out a letter to its distribution partners yesterday. If you’ve been following along with the Arduino vs Arduino story (we’ve previously published two installments), the content isn’t entirely surprising; it’s essentially a tactical move to reassure their distribution channels that Arduino SRL is the “One True Arduino”. That said, there’s still some new tidbits buried inside. You can skip down to read the full text below, but here’s our take.

The Business History of Arduino

A quick summary of the legal situation. Arduino LLC was formed in April 2008 by the original five founders to provide a corporate entity behind the Arduino project. Smart Projects SRL, controlled by one of the founders, was tasked with the actual production of the boards. It turns out that Smart Projects had trademarked the Arduino brand in Italy in December 2008, before Arduino LLC got around to filing in April 2009 in the USA. But everyone was friends, right? As long as the licensing fees keep flowing.

Fast-forward to September 2014, when Arduino LLC filed a lawsuit in Italy against Smart Projects claiming that they had infringed LLC’s trademark and that they had recently stopped paying licensing fees on their use of the Arduino name. In October, Smart Projects filed with the USPTO to revoke Arduino LLC’s trademark. In late 2014, Smart Projects changed its company name to Arduino SRL (a “Società a responsabilità limitata” is one form of Italian limited-liability company) and hired a new CEO, [Federico Musto].  Around the same time, Arduino SRL opened up the website arduino.org (different from long-existing arduino.cc) but with nearly identical style. In January 2015, Arduino LLC filed a lawsuit in the US, claiming their right on the Arduino name.

The Gist of it

In short, Arduino LLC has been working on developing the Arduino platform, software, and community while Smart Projects / Arduino SRL was the major official producer of the hardware for most boards. Both are claiming to “be” Arduino, and going after each other in court. So it’s not strange that Arduino SRL would like to try to keep its hold on the distribution channels. Which brings us to their letter to distributors.

March 27 Letter

A good portion of the letter reads to be a very carefully worded defense of why Arduino SRL is the true Arduino:

“Arduino Srl (aka Smart Projects Srl), as you know has been from the  beginning of the Arduino® project, the place where the ideas were turned into reality and into a business.”

This is of course strictly true — Smart Projects was certainly the largest manufacturer of Arduino boards. But it sidesteps the issue at hand in the trademark suits: whether they were simply a licensed producer of the boards or whether they’re “Arduino”.

Similarly, in the questions section of the letter, they ask if there are actually two “Arduino” product manufacturers, and answer “not really”. Of course, that’s true. Arduino LLC doesn’t manufacture boards, but exists to license their trademark out to fund development.

The only real news in the letter is that Arduino SRL is replacing its old distribution and logistics company, Magyc Now, with a new one named CC Logistics. Both Magyc and CC Logistics are named as defendants in the US lawsuit filed by Arduino LLC, so it’s unlikely that this change is due to legal fallout.

What this Means

In conclusion, Arduino SRL’s letter to its distributors seems to essentially follow the line of reasoning in their trademark lawsuit in the US against Arduino LLC: since Arduino SRL is doing the manufacturing and using the Arduino name, they’re the true Arduino. Whether or not this will stand up in court, or whether Arduino LLC can make its case that SRL was simply a licensed manufacturer, remains to be seen.

We’ve embedded the contents of the letter after the break. You can also download the original PDF.

Ivrea (TO) , March 27, 2015

Dear Partners,

At this time we feel it necessary to update our partners on the state of Arduino® products and the distribution business which you are a key part of.

Arduino Srl (aka Smart Projects Srl), as you know has been from the beginning of the Arduino® project, the place where the ideas were turned into reality and into a business. The first Arduino® models were made and initially distributed to schools of interactive design all over the world.

Arduino® products were then offered to the first DIY enthusiasts, contributing concretely, as one of the first open source electronic boards, to found and promote the Makers Movement: your strong efforts and contribution have made this great new movement a success and has grown in many new exciting areas like IoT and m2m. A realization that will change the world of electronics and communications in the physical world.

The family of Arduino® boards has helped professional and non-professional developers to prototype electrical projects and learn in a way that is accessible and possible for everyone.

Currently, Arduino Srl continues to be the only designer and manufacturer of original Arduino® products.

Open Source is the environment we want for millions of designers, engineers, makers and Arduino® lovers around the world. We hope to continue to help children and newbies learn about electrical engineering and computer programming, in order to develop and grow their ideas for today and tomorrow.

This fantastic story and these ideals will continue on the new website Arduino.org, which has been developed to ensure we stay true to the vision of the beginning of Arduino® and Arduino Srl and our distribution of these cool products.

Beginning in 2015 new changes have been put into place to ensure that our companies can continue to grow with the popularity of the Arduino® product line. The production of these high quality products continue to be done in Europe and specifically Italy which has been very successful.

Our distribution and logistics are going through a change for a couple of reasons, to help with faster deliveries and lower transport costs, we have a new company structure cc logistics that have offices and warehouses in three continents, EMEA Cham Switzerland, North American Boston Massachusetts and APAC Honk Kong and Taipei.

Additionally lots of work are being completed to get inventories in line with demand. New personnel are being added to in many areas for response to your buying needs but also in the sales and support areas to ensure we are creating demand for Arduino products and for our distribution channel. These new sales people from time to time will be in contact to forge closer working relationships.

To help inform our partners of some questions recently raised in the press and other areas:

Q: Are there two “Arduino® ” branded products manufacturers?

A: Not really, the only company that ever designed and manufactured the “Arduino® ” branded product is Arduino Srl (formerly Smart Projects Srl). Others, for a number of reasons, have created in USA and Switzerland “Arduino” named companies. Some have been involved in completing contracts for web site development and PR (namely Arduino SA – Switzerland take cares of the web site arduino.cc has been one of those). Clearly this has been the place to go for open source info in the past, but we will make arduino.org your new comprehensive location for this info and other valuable resources and services.

Q: I have heard in the press that there is a disagreement going on amongst initial founders of the open source project which inspired the Arduino® business.

A: Yes, there is a disagreement between the initial founders of the open source project (which have never been shareholders of Arduino Srl) and the actual management of Arduino Srl. We are confident that these issues will come to a conclusion shortly. Frankly some of these issues are complex because related to the validity of the registration of the trademark “Arduino® ” in some areas of the world and cannot be summarized in few words. In this respect just bear in mind that Arduino Srl (aka Smart Projects Srl) has been the sole manufacturer of the original “Arduino® ” branded products, selling and distributing them world wide for 10 years.

Q: Will cc logistics replace Magyc as distribution points ?

A: That is the big plan but exceptions may happen due to the nature of doing a worldwide distribution. cc logistics will help our makers to produce and distribute their projects in a world wide arena.

Q: Will Arduino make new products and new software?

A: Yes, new software and new products are the life blood of Arduino® . Recently new products, Arduino® Zero Pro, Arduino® , 9 Axes shield partnership with Bosch and many more are coming.

Q: Will Arduino forge technology partnership?

A: Arduino is in the forefront of new exciting fields like IoT and m2m which is an exciting direction of the type of prototyping done with present day Arduino® products. We are in constant contact with major companies exploring these exciting fields. The Arduino YUN with its wifi capabilities and open source processing has ignited lots of new opportunities.

Q: Arduino EMEA, APAC and NA Distributors Sales Meeting

A: We are planning and will notify you of the details of the first global annual meeting

Q: Is there a New Management structure in Arduino ?

A: As it happens in every company that grows as fast as the Arduino environment, additional expertises and capabilities are needed to help steer the company in the correct direction. Federico Musto is the new CEO of Arduino group and he has a strong background in the open source business.

You are Arduino and we are honored and privileged to work with you – Arduino isn’t the company, nor the board, nor the software nor the founders – the Arduino is YOU – You made Arduino® what it is today and you’ll continue to make it what it will be in the future.

Thank you in advance for your help and support

Arduino team

Arduino Srl
legal adress: Via Romano, 12 – 10010 Scarmagno (TO) Italy
shipping address: Via Kennedy, 36 – 10019 Strambino (TO) Italy


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