Posts with «sketch» label

Simultaneous Soldering Station

Soldering irons are a personal tool. Some folks need them on the cool side, and some like it hot. Getting it right takes some practice and experience, but when you find a tip and temp that works, you stick with it. [Riccardo Pittini] landed somewhere in the middle with his open-source soldering station, Soldering RT1. When you start it up, it asks what temperature you want, and it heats up. Easy-peasy. When you are ready to get fancy, you can plug in a second iron, run off a car battery, record preset temperatures, limit your duty-cycle, and open a serial connection.

The controller has an Arduino bootloader on a 32u4 processor, so it looks like a ProMicro to your computer. The system works with the RT series of Weller tips, which have a comprehensive lineup. [Riccardo] also recreated SMD tweezers, and you can find everything at his Tindie store.

Soldering has a way of bringing out opinions from novices to masters. If we could interview our younger selves, we’d have a few nuggets of wisdom for those know-it-alls. If ergonomics are your priority, check out TS100 3D-printed cases, which is an excellent iron, in our opinion.

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Basics of ARDUINO BOARD...

The video explains some basics of ARDUINO BOARD and its related components...

Comunikino, an Arduino based communication system


“Social things” have replaced traditional ways of communication like sms and mails. One day i needed a new, fast, mobile and snappy way of communication. So i made Comunikino.

It consists of two main parts, a script in python that runs on the PC and a box that goes on desktop connected through an USB cable used for data and power (no external power needed if you use a 500mA capable usb port!). You need to create a mailbox  for Comunikino with pop access, i raccomend to use gmail as many providers don’t offer pop access for free mailboxes.

Using Comunikino is simple, just send a mail to its mailbox and the subject will be printed to its LCD (max 16 chars). Who reads the message can use one of three Comunikino’s buttons to send a mail back to the address setted in python script to say yes, no or readed (this button can also to be used to say: “hey! I’m thinking of you”). Simple, isn’t it?

Schematics

Built instructions

You will need:

Amount Part Type Properties
1 Arduino I’ve used a 2009
1 Basic Servo
1 LCD screen I’ve used a 16×2 LCD based on SPLC780D chip which is totally compatible with Arduino LCD library that is made for HD44780 chip. Its voltage must be 5V!
3 Push-button Momentary normally open push button
1 Rotary Potentiometer Rotary Shaft Potentiometer; see datasheet for maximum resistance
1 Metal or plastic box I used a 13,5×7,5×5,5 cm metal box but you can use anything similar.

First of all the box. You should cut it as images below.

LCD mounting:

Now fix arduino and buttons like this:

Mounting servo:

Putting things together (you can note a recycled hard disk flat cable used to connect LCD, ricycling is good!):

The flag can be made by wood, mdf, or cardboard:

Setting up software

Now download Comunikino's software (122) (Linux and windows version inside) and configure python script with the data of the mailbox you have created for Comunikino (gmail is highly recommended). You can do this just editing the script with a text editor. At the beginning you will find variables that you have to change, read comments for explanation! You need also to download and burn into Arduino the sketch into the zip (no modification needed here).  Remember, before launching python script you have to connect Comunikino to PC or it will quit with an error. I advice you to leave Comunikino linked to the computer and make the script run on start up. Comunikino will inform you that it is ready to communicate with a mail every time computer is turned on.

Comunikino is ready!

Perhaps you may find interesting:

Eraclitux 24 Nov 23:43
arduino  idea  project  projects  python  sketch  

Comunikino, an Arduino based communication system


“Social things” have replaced traditional ways of communication like sms and mails. One day i needed a new, fast, mobile and snappy way of communication. So i made Comunikino.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y9fqseT9PI0

It consists of two main parts, a script in python that runs on the PC and a box that goes on desktop connected through an USB cable used for data and power (no external power needed if you use a 500mA capable usb port!). You need to create a mailbox  for Comunikino with pop access, i raccomend to use gmail as many providers don’t offer pop access for free mailboxes.

Using Comunikino is simple, just send a mail to its mailbox and the subject will be printed to its LCD (max 16 chars). Who reads the message can use one of three Comunikino’s buttons to send a mail back to the address setted in python script to say yes, no or readed (this button can also to be used to say: “hey! I’m thinking of you”). Simple, isn’t it?

Schematics

Built instructions

You will need:

Amount Part Type Properties
1 Arduino I’ve used a 2009
1 Basic Servo
1 LCD screen I’ve used a 16×2 LCD based on SPLC780D chip which is totally compatible with Arduino LCD library that is made for HD44780 chip. Its voltage must be 5V!
3 Push-button Momentary normally open push button
1 Rotary Potentiometer Rotary Shaft Potentiometer; see datasheet for maximum resistance
1 Metal or plastic box I used a 13,5×7,5×5,5 cm metal box but you can use anything similar.

First of all the box. You should cut it as images below.

LCD mounting:

Now fix arduino and buttons like this:

Mounting servo:

Putting things together (you can note a recycled hard disk flat cable used to connect LCD, ricycling is good!):

The flag can be made by wood, mdf, or cardboard:

Setting up software

Now download Comunikino's software (430) (Linux and windows version inside) and configure python script with the data of the mailbox you have created for Comunikino (gmail is highly recommended). You can do this just editing the script with a text editor. At the beginning you will find variables that you have to change, read comments for explanation! You need also to download and burn into Arduino the sketch into the zip (no modification needed here).  Remember, before launching python script you have to connect Comunikino to PC or it will quit with an error. I advice you to leave Comunikino linked to the computer and make the script run on start up. Comunikino will inform you that it is ready to communicate with a mail every time computer is turned on.

Comunikino is ready!

I want to upgrade this device with advanced features. I want to create a better software with GUI and a nice looking box. Help me!

Eraclitux 24 Nov 23:43
arduino  idea  project  projects  python  sketch  

Communicate with Arduino using python

Os: linux, windows (not tested), mac osx (not tested)
Difficulty: medium
Knowledge you need: a little bit of python programming (ver 2.x) and Arduino

Let’s see how easy it is to communicate with an Arduino 2009 board and the  pySerial python’s module. What we will do is to use python to send characters serially to an Arduino 2009 which will send them back. Obviously, everything has a demonstration purposes only, since the code proposed here has no specific function but you can easily modify it to get something usable for your projects. What you describe has been tested on Ubuntu 10.04 but should work on other distributions as on various Windows and Mac OSX. If you have problems let me know!

1 Install pySerial

[Linux] Use your favorite packet manager to install python-serial or from command line type the famous command (on Ubuntu &co.):

sudo apt-get install python-serial

Type administration password and you are done!
[Windows] Download ed install pySerial (the file should be pyserial-2.5.win32.exe)

2 Download  test software

Program Arduino with this sketch Serial echo test program (84) and download the  python code Python to Arduino test program (98). Open it with a text editor and see if at line 23 in place of ’/ dev/ttyUSB0′ what you find the editor of the Arduino sketch below themenu Tools -> Serial Port -> xxxxxxx. Remeber, do not forget the single quotes!

conn = serial.Serial('/dev/ttyUSB0', timeout=1)

3 Let’s try

With Arduino programmed with the sketch above and connected to the computer launch communication.py, if it works the board will send back all the ASCII characters that you type on the keyboard. You can verify that the communication is actually taking place looking at the flashing LED TX and RX on the board. Now you can to modify these examples to suit your needs.

Ah! The python’s way…

Eraclitux 20 Feb 11:13

Communicate with Arduino using python

Os: linux, windows (not tested), mac osx (not tested)
Difficulty: medium
Knowledge you need: a little bit of python programming (ver 2.x) and Arduino

Let’s see how easy it is to communicate with an Arduino 2009 board and the  pySerial python’s module. What we will do is to use python to send characters serially to an Arduino 2009 which will send them back. Obviously, everything has a demonstration purposes only, since the code proposed here has no specific function but you can easily modify it to get something usable for your projects. What you describe has been tested on Ubuntu 10.04 but should work on other distributions as on various Windows and Mac OSX. If you have problems let me know!

1 Install pySerial

[Linux] Use your favorite packet manager to install python-serial or from command line type the famous command (on Ubuntu &co.):

sudo apt-get install python-serial

Type administration password and you are done!
[Windows] Download ed install pySerial (the file should be pyserial-2.5.win32.exe)

2 Download  test software

Program Arduino with this sketch Serial echo test program (403) and download the  python code Python to Arduino test program (385). Open it with a text editor and see if at line 23 in place of ’/ dev/ttyUSB0′ what you find the editor of the Arduino sketch below themenu Tools -> Serial Port -> xxxxxxx. Remeber, do not forget the single quotes!

conn = serial.Serial('/dev/ttyUSB0', timeout=1)

3 Let’s try

With Arduino programmed with the sketch above and connected to the computer launch communication.py, if it works the board will send back all the ASCII characters that you type on the keyboard. You can verify that the communication is actually taking place looking at the flashing LED TX and RX on the board. Now you can to modify these examples to suit your needs.

Ah! The python’s way…

Eraclitux 20 Feb 11:13