Posts with «jukebox» label

Arduino and Pi Breathe New Life into Jukebox

What do you do when someone gives you a Wurlitzer 3100 jukebox from 1969, but keeps all the records? If you are like [Tijuana Rick], you grab an Arduino and a Rasberry Pi and turn it into a really awesome digital music player.

We’ll grant you, making a music player out of a Raspberry Pi isn’t all that cutting edge, but restoration and integration work is really impressive. The machine had many broken switches that had been hastily repaired, so [Rick] had to learn to create silicone molds and cast resin to create replacements. You can see and hear the end result in the video below.

[Rick] was frustrated with jukebox software he could find, until he found some Python code from [Thomas Sprinkmeier]. [Rick] used that code as a base and customized it for his needs.

There’s not much “how to” detail about the castings for the switches, but there are lots of photos and the results were great. We wondered if he considered putting fake 45s in the machine so it at least looked like it was playing vinyl.

Of course, you don’t need an old piece of hardware to make a jukebox. Or, you can compromise and build out a replica.

 

 


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, Raspberry Pi

’60s jukebox modernized with an Arduino Mega

As seen here, artist Tijuana Rick’s father-in-law received a 1969 Wurlitzer 3100 jukebox for free, with one small catch. It didn’t come with any records. Of course, Rick could have purchased vintage records from a number of sources, but instead decided to transform it into an amazing retro music streaming device.

In order to take input from the jukebox’s 40+ interface buttons, he turned to the Arduino Mega. After the Mega receives these on/off signals, it then pushes selection information to a Raspberry Pi, which does the actual streaming.

Luckily, he had stumbled upon this GitHub repository from Thomas Sprinkmeier, which became the foundation for the project’s software. You can find more details and images of Tijuana Rick’s restoration on his website, including how he cast replacement buttons that he needed for the jukebox in silicon molds!

Payphone Boombox Straight Out of the 1990’s.

Due largely to the overwhelming dominance of mobile phones, payphones are a sometimes overlooked relic from the 90’s and earlier eras. While seldom seen out in the wild these days, they can however still be acquired for a moderate fee — how many of you knew that? Setting out to prove the lasting usefulness of the payphone, Instructables user [Fuzzy-Wobble] has dialed the retro spirit way past eleven to his ’90 from the ’90s’ payphone boombox.

Conspicuously mounted in the corner of his office, a rangefinder sets the phone to ringing when somebody walks by — a fantastic trap for luring the curious into a nostalgia trip. Anyone who picks up will be prompted to punch in a code from the attached mini-phone book and those who do will be treated to one of ninety hits from — well —  the 1990’s. All of the songs have been specifically downgraded to 128kbps for that authentic 90’s sound — complete with audio artifacts. There’s even a little easter egg wherein hitting the coin-return lever triggers the payphone to shout “Get a job!”

[Fuzzy-Wobble] notes that a payphone bracket is indispensable as most all payphones are made of cast iron, and nobody likes holes ripped out of their walls due to improper mounting. They’ve also provided their code as well as links to other tutorials for aspects of the build — such as the Adafruit music maker — throughout. Now you’ll have to excuse us as we groove while lost in a reverie.

Kick it back an extra decade and you get an 80’s boombox bluetooth speaker.

[Thanks for the submission, Alex S!!]


Filed under: phone hacks
Hack a Day 02 Dec 03:00

A DIY Jukebox made with Arduino and NFC Shield

DIY Jukebox is a project made by Mario Pucci to show how Arduino Uno, NFC Shield and Python can be used to build a real jukebox. NFC means Near Field Communication and the NFC shield can perceive objects attached to little chips called NFC tags containing specific messages. In this project, Marco programmed each chip to play a different music genre when the tag is inserted in the cardboard jukebox:

You can download the file of the cardboard Jukebox at this link and the sketches here.

The steps of the tutorial are in italian but you can use google translate if needed! Enjoy the sound of music

Arduino Blog 16 Sep 14:32
arduino  featured  jukebox  music  nfc  shield  tutorial  uno  

Arduino Mp3 Player – Arduino JukeBox

A full Arduino MP3 player using a SD card and a MP3 module based on a chip from VLSI (VS1002d, VS1003 VS1053). The player includes a small amplifier and two speakers, making it a small Jukebox in the age of Ipods. The project includes a small library for the management of the MP3 and the SD chip. A Funny Arduino project ..

via [arduino-guay]

Arduino Blog 15 Nov 16:05
ic  jukebox  mp3  mp3 player  music  vs1002d  vs1003  vs1053  

Social JukeBox: a physical connection to Spotify

Social Jukebox is an Arduino-powered music player tailored to allow music sharing through tangible interaction. The device, based on  wooden tokens, has the aim of  bring back the physical aspect of music sharing and allow  multi-user listening in a social environment. The tokens have RFID chips embedded in them, so the music player can read the link to a Spotify song. The device randomly selects tokens and tracks as it goes, creating a real-life, listening experience.

For more information : http://interaction.dundee.ac.uk/~apairman/wordpress/